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Misty Copeland's Under Armour ad


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#1 sandik

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:26 AM

(moderators -- if there's another thread already, or if this belongs in a different forum, please move it)

 

I need to start by saying that I haven't seen Copeland dance live, and so like many of the people seeing these ads, my image of her comes mostly from video and print.  I was struck, in the comment threads on Jezebel, with the variety of responses, from "I didn't know dance was that hard" to "I remember how hard it was when I was training."  Related to the conversation elsewhere on BA about role models, many of the comments here are not keyed exclusively to race, or even to body type conventions -- this is eavesdropping on a different audience.



#2 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 11:19 AM

Wow. Lotta Gaynor Minden hate going on in that thread ... 



#3 sandik

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 11:41 AM

Yes, but I was more interested in the commentary from people outside of the professional/avocational world.  We often worry that dance runs under the radar for the vast part of the population -- I was interested in seeing those responses.



#4 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 12:12 PM

Yes, but I was more interested in the commentary from people outside of the professional/avocational world.  We often worry that dance runs under the radar for the vast part of the population -- I was interested in seeing those responses.

 

Those were good to read, of course! 

 

But I did find it amusing that an ad that makes a fuss about overcoming negative assessments of one's body type -- including not having the "right feet" -- generated comments like this: "Murphy's Gaynors hurt my heart. They actually manage to make a principal at ABT look like she has bad feet."

 

ETA: the comment I quoted was in response to a picture of Gillian Murphy that someone had posted as an example of (and I quote) "a more typical [ballet] body type." In any event, Murphy's feet look just fine to me. 



#5 kfw

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 05:54 AM

PBS has posted a lovely feature on Copeland.



#6 abatt

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 08:18 AM

I'm an avid US Open watcher on ESPN, and I've seen Misty's Under Armour ad numerous times during the commercial breaks.

 

Looks like Misty is going to have some major competition.  Under Armour has signed supermodel Giselle Bundchen as a spokesperson. The link mentions that Bundchen, Lindsay Vonn, Kelley O'Hara and Sloane Stevens will be part of a new ad campaign.

 

http://www.foxsports...-endorsers.html



#7 sandik

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 02:29 PM

That is an interesting combination of people, but in some ways a much more conventional set of choices for this product than Copeland herself.  Notice that this Fox Sports article doesn't mention Copeland as part of the ad campaign.



#8 volcanohunter

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 05:16 PM

I will take it as a good sign that a sports network fails to recognize Copeland as an athlete. Perhaps ballet is still an art form after all.

#9 abatt

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 05:03 AM

Maybe Under Armour has decided that their main customer base for women are women who are interested in and participate in sports, not ballet.  Bundchen's hiring is a little odd in this regard, but her husband Tom Brady has been a spokesman since 2010, so maybe they are going to do some ads as a couple.  The couple that works out together can stay together and look like Tom and Gisele?



#10 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 09:38 AM

Here's a giant Misty Copeland Under Armour billboard on Lafayette Street heading uptown towards Astor Place. Not a great shot, but you'll get the idea ...

 

Edit:  Ugh ... issues with source file. I hope to get the image up again later today ...



#11 yudi

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:06 PM

 

"And at 13, you are too old to be considered."

 

Didn't Nureyev start very late also? 15 years old?

innocent.gif



#12 volcanohunter

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:33 PM

Nureyev was 17 when he entered the Vaganova Academy, though he had a background in Bashkir folk dancing. The training of the Canadian ballerina Evelyn Hart was fraught with all sorts of difficulties and interruptions, so she did not begin serious, systematic training until she was 17, but by 20 she was a professional dancer. Four years later she won the gold medal at Varna. Tomas Schramek had never been a ballet dancer when he fled Czechoslovakia in 1968, but he had been a professional Slovakian folk dancer, and his training included ballet. He was hired by the National Ballet of Canada and became a principal dancer within four years. The first time I saw him on stage was as the Prince in Nureyev's production of Sleeping Beauty, and that choreography is no walk in the park!



#13 Helene

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 02:53 PM

Melissa Hayden started late, at 15 or 16.  There was always more of a chance to start late as a man, too.

 

In her recent Ballet Initiative podcast interview, Alicia Graf Mack said that it was possible for Copeland because she was a prodigy. 



#14 volcanohunter

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 07:45 PM

I don't remember the details of Breaking Pointe, but I seem to recall that Ballet West's Allison DeBona began her serious training much later than most. Certainly it's unusual for ballet dancers to have begun their training as teens, but it does happen.



#15 Helene

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 08:38 PM

De Bona started young and was quite serious, but stopped training for a few years in high school before she started again.  She had the foundation before she stopped.  She did, though, attend Indiana University before starting her professional career.




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