Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

What's the name for this move (Don Quixote DVD cover)?She kicks her back leg up really high while making this jump.


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#16 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,272 posts

Posted 31 July 2014 - 05:41 AM

Here's Lepeshinskaya's earlier rendition of the part in question. As we can see, @ 1:06 she opens her variation with a sissone, pretty  much a smaller scale version of "The Plisetskaya".  Now, at the very moment where Plisetskaya does the first of the two, Lepeshinskaya dances a completely different series of steps-(@ 1:18). 

 

 



#17 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,405 posts

Posted 31 July 2014 - 08:18 AM

In figure skating, there are moves, like the Biellmann and Natasha spins, that were performed by skaters years before they were revived and named for famous practitioners.

 

Depending on the ballet, there can be a wide range of notations, descriptions, score notations,and ballet master notes and notebooks that tell, or purport to tell, what Petipa choreographed. (The latter two used heavily and with great effect in PNB's "Giselle." ) There's a lot we know through the treasures of the notations and their expert interpreters, as well as descriptions from the time and other source materials.  The question is whether there were any early source materials for this jump in particular.



#18 California

California

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,563 posts

Posted 31 July 2014 - 09:38 AM

Has anyone tried to reconstruct the original Don Q? I don't recall hearing anything, although plenty of people offer their own versions (Ratmansky, Acosta, Nureyev, Baryshnikov). I also have no sense of what documentation exists of the original. I believe this was Petipa's first major work in Russia, so perhaps they weren't geared up for recording his work in some form.



#19 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,739 posts

Posted 31 July 2014 - 01:22 PM

Has anyone tried to reconstruct the original Don Q? I don't recall hearing anything, although plenty of people offer their own versions (Ratmansky, Acosta, Nureyev, Baryshnikov). I also have no sense of what documentation exists of the original. I believe this was Petipa's first major work in Russia, so perhaps they weren't geared up for recording his work in some form.

 

I'll bet that Doug would know...



#20 cubanmiamiboy

cubanmiamiboy

    Diamonds Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,272 posts

Posted 31 July 2014 - 02:37 PM

I seem to recall from Danilova's biography that she had been promised the role at the Mariinsky when a revival was going to take place.  I think Lepeshinskaya is the earlier interpreter we know of so far post revolution..?



#21 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,739 posts

Posted 31 July 2014 - 08:18 PM

Has anyone tried to reconstruct the original Don Q? I don't recall hearing anything, although plenty of people offer their own versions (Ratmansky, Acosta, Nureyev, Baryshnikov). I also have no sense of what documentation exists of the original. I believe this was Petipa's first major work in Russia, so perhaps they weren't geared up for recording his work in some form.

 

I sent this query to Doug Fullington, and this is what he had to say

 

 

There is nothing except one variation in the Stepanov notations, but Burlaka and Ratmansky did lots of recon work with the Bolshoi archives (and likely the Bakhrushin Museum holdings) for Ratmansky’s Dutch National production. I think there are some vids on the Dutch National site in which Ratmansky explains.

 

Well, actually he doesn’t discuss that in these:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=iPGzt_UWQG0

https://www.youtube....h?v=42_VNlQ1-w8

 

I know they looked at the Moscow production and sought to reinstate elements that were eliminated or changed when Petipa staged it in St. P. This resulted in expanded roles for the Don and Sancho P. and a different set of characters out in the country (I think actors and puppeteers rather than gypsies?). It also resulted in a revised and re-edited musical score. When I have a minute, I’ll dig out the Het Nationale program book, where everything is documented.



#22 Amy Reusch

Amy Reusch

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,794 posts

Posted 01 August 2014 - 09:05 AM

Why do we not credit Gorsky more for this ballet?  It seems an odd way to pay respect to Petipa, to credit him with choreography that angered him with its changes...   However disrespectful it was to Petipa to make the changes, the ballet has been very successful and entered the canon... perhaps Gorsky deserves some respect for the longevity of the current choreography?   The wikipedia entry on him is interesting:  http://en.wikipedia....xeyevich_Gorsky    

 

I would have thought, given Don Quixote, that bravura technique was a hallmark of his style... but perhaps this is a misunderstanding?



#23 sandik

sandik

    Rubies Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,739 posts

Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:07 AM

Well, the author of that Wikipedia page certainly things that Gorsky should get more credit!

 

He does get far less recognition in the west, I think in part because he was the one that stayed home.  Fokine came to the west along with the Ballet Russe, and although he himself went back and forth, his works became identified as the 'revolutionary' ones -- the reaction to Petipa's formalism.  Gorsky's changes to the corps are most obvious in Don Q -- they really are a more dynamic, expressive and naturalistic element in the work, but you're right that we tend to give Petipa the credit for the whole, including those changes.

 

In general, we think of authorship, even in dance, as a singular phenomenon -- one person gets the credit when things go well, and the blame when they go badly.  There are plenty of examples of works that were created in a partnership at the beginning (not to mention the more piecemeal additions/emendations/recisions that fill dance stages everywhere) but we like to think of the "text" as the product of a solo effort.

 

Gorsky, as I understand his work, didn't turn his back on traditional virtuosity in quite the same way that Fokine did -- if you look at Don Q, most of the bravura elements are still there, but they are interspersed within some major level hubbub in the corps.  I don't have any evidence to back this thought up, but to me, this kind of stage action seems very like the early films of Cecil deMille, with their active crowd scenes intercut with more specific dramatic action.



#24 yudi

yudi

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 160 posts

Posted 03 August 2014 - 12:46 PM

There was a topic discussion on whether the Chinese invented this or not and the people who discussed it had an interesting name for it, but I can't remember and don't know how to find that topic now. It was maybe a few months ago when the discussion was here on Ballet Alert. I think in the discussion someone found that the kick to the head was found in The Fountain of Bakchisarai which pre-dated the Chinese ballet that included it. But for the life of me I can not remember the name of it. 

 

Yes, here it is:
The Plisetskaya Head-Kick



#25 Birdsall

Birdsall

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,339 posts

Posted 03 August 2014 - 12:48 PM

 

There was a topic discussion on whether the Chinese invented this or not and the people who discussed it had an interesting name for it, but I can't remember and don't know how to find that topic now. It was maybe a few months ago when the discussion was here on Ballet Alert. I think in the discussion someone found that the kick to the head was found in The Fountain of Bakchisarai which pre-dated the Chinese ballet that included it. But for the life of me I can not remember the name of it. 

 

Yes, here it is:
The Plisetskaya Head-Kick

 

 

Cool!!!!! Yudi found it! I remembered reading that but could not remember what main heading it would be under! 



#26 j1yuan

j1yuan

    New Member

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 05 August 2014 - 07:01 AM

Cheers!



#27 Drew

Drew

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,313 posts

Posted 14 August 2014 - 12:24 PM

Here's Lepeshinskaya's earlier rendition of the part in question. As we can see, @ 1:06 she opens her variation with a sissone, pretty  much a smaller scale version of "The Plisetskaya".  Now, at the very moment where Plisetskaya does the first of the two, Lepeshinskaya dances a completely different series of steps-(@ 1:18). 

 

 

By chance found this photo of Lepeshinskaya when looking for something else from Soviet era--hard to tell from a still photo but at least a strong family resemblance to the jump being discussed:

 

http://en.wikipedia....skaya-Kitri.jpg

 

(There is other quite wonderful video of  her on youtube...not doing this jump, but very fun.)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):