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What's the name for this move (Don Quixote DVD cover)?She kicks her back leg up really high while making this jump.


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#1 j1yuan

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 09:25 AM

On the DVD cover page, the female dancer makes this move:

 

http://www.amazon.co... quixote ballet

 

What's the name for this move?

 

Thanks!

 



#2 California

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 10:05 AM

On the DVD cover page, the female dancer makes this move:
 
http://www.amazon.co... quixote ballet
 
What's the name for this move?


I think it's commonly called the Plisetskaya, named after Maya Plisetskaya (although I've heard people call it simply the "Kitri jump"). If you search YouTube, you can find some clips. Here's one:



#3 Helene

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 10:08 AM

Merrill Ashley referred to it that way in her book.  Balanchine wanted something big and unexpected in "Ballo della Regina" and she remembered this jump Plisetskaya did.



#4 j1yuan

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 10:37 AM

Sorry, I didn't mean the Kitri entry jump! I meant the jumps she made before she made the spins. If you start at the 18" mark on this Youtube video (), you'll see it.



#5 California

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 10:42 AM

The jumps at 21, 25, 29 are the Plisetskaya's. In the B&W clip I posted, you do see it in the entrance sequence, although not as clearly as in the Osipova clip.



#6 j1yuan

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 11:38 AM

The jumps at 21, 25, 29 are the Plisetskaya's. In the B&W clip I posted, you do see it in the entrance sequence, although not as clearly as in the Osipova clip.

The Kitri entry jump peaks when the legs are both horizontal and upper body is vertical and it doesn't arch toward either leg. The jump that I asked peaks when the legs are at about 45 degree angle (one forward, one backward), and the upper body arches back toward the back leg. So, I don't think they should be called by the same name. But, I may be wrong.



#7 California

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 11:54 AM

The still photo in the DVD cover that started this really does seem to be a Plisetskaya, although the shot isn't quite as impressive as the Kirkland Time magazine cover of many years ago. In the first two jumps in the B&W, she does not have both legs horizontal (a "split jump"?), so perhaps that's what rg is referring to?  She seems at the beginning and later to be arching back, with the front leg pointing down, so I'm not sure what to call it at this point!



#8 lmspear

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 12:14 PM

In an earlier discussion under another thread, it someone proposed that the jump was a hugh sissone with an arched back.

#9 Birdsall

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:18 PM

There was a topic discussion on whether the Chinese invented this or not and the people who discussed it had an interesting name for it, but I can't remember and don't know how to find that topic now. It was maybe a few months ago when the discussion was here on Ballet Alert. I think in the discussion someone found that the kick to the head was found in The Fountain of Bakchisarai which pre-dated the Chinese ballet that included it. But for the life of me I can not remember the name of it. 



#10 Fraildove

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:38 PM

I've always had it refered as an assemble sissone ferme.

#11 Janneke

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:58 PM

I've heard it being (unceremoniously) called a "ring leap".



#12 j1yuan

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 02:00 PM

There was a topic discussion on whether the Chinese invented this or not and the people who discussed it had an interesting name for it, but I can't remember and don't know how to find that topic now. It was maybe a few months ago when the discussion was here on Ballet Alert. I think in the discussion someone found that the kick to the head was found in The Fountain of Bakchisarai which pre-dated the Chinese ballet that included it. But for the life of me I can not remember the name of it. 

I think the Chinese name "倒踢紫金冠" is very similar, as in this Youtube video -->

Unfortunately, the dancer didn't jump. She just made a back kick with her upper body arched back. So, it may not be called by the same ballet name.



#13 California

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 02:12 PM

Who knew this much-loved jump had so many names!! I wondered what Gelsey Kirkland called it, as she is so associated with it, thanks to Don Q with Baryshnikov and that Time magazine cover. Not much help! This is all I could find:

 

Maya had a special leap that seemed to capture for all time the joyous elevation of Kitri's spirit. This was an awesome jump, a kick-jete in which she soared so high and arched back so far that her head actually touched her back leg, like a beautiful curved explosion in the air.

-Dancing on my Grave, p. 191



#14 canbelto

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 06:00 PM

I read that Lydia Ivanova was the first dancer to do this kind of jump.



#15 California

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 05:03 AM

I read that Lydia Ivanova was the first dancer to do this kind of jump.


Do you have a source for this? I am looking at Elizabeth Kendall's wonderful book about her, Balanchine & the Lost Muse. It does discuss her amazing jumps (see especially p. 196), but nothing sounds specifically like what I've called the Plisetskaya. In any event, this would be almost a half century before Plisetskaya, so this would be significant. If others have the book, could they take a look at that page and see what they think?

I remember hearing a talk by a dance historian on Don Q (I'll be vague here about time and place, as I don't want to embarrass anybody). She showed a clip of what I've been calling the Plisetskaya and told the audience to watch for it in Act I. She called it "the Kitri jump." During the Q&A, I said I had heard it called the Plisetskaya, named after the first dancer who performed it. She was adamant that the jump appeared in Petipa's original choreography in the 19th century. I nodded my head and didn't say anything more, but that just didn't sound right to me. First, how do we know exactly what was in the original choreography, with no video, vague notations, and an oral tradition that didn't always transmit the exact same steps? Second, why would so many people call it Plisetskaya, if the move had always been there, almost a century before?


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