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Wednesday, July 30


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#1 dirac

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 07:42 AM

The Arts Desk

 

British audiences expecting extended physically intimate pas de deux will be disappointed by all the clipped dance phrases in the Lavrovsky. Steps appear one by one, presaged only by their classroom sequence run-up – coupé, glissade, grand jété, or preparation, run, run, jété entrelacé – with no sense of carrying meaning through a longer musical or movement phrase. The compensation (this is not dance-by-numbers Chabukiani) comes in tableaux of genius: Romeo holding Juliet, arms outstretched, up to the dawn light from the window; Friar Lawrence in his bare cell contemplating a skull for all the world like a quattrocento fresco of St Jerome; mourners kneeling on the steps of Juliet’s tomb with their upcurved white arms briefly conjuring a graceful living pyramid.

 

 

The Telegraph

 

It is, if one is honest, hard not to find fault with the Russian rendering. Its pas de deux have neither the subtlety, erotic charge nor reckless abandon of MacMillan’s, the fight scenes lack his venom, and the closing scene has an inappropriate dash of optimism. Pyotr William’s designs – elegant as they are – suffer by comparison with Nicholas Georgiadis’s sumptuous creations, and on Monday night the Mariinsky’s orchestra took a primary-coloured and often hasty approach to Prokofiev’s masterpiece of a score that tended to favour the more abrasive passages.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 07:53 AM

A BBC News story on Xander Parish. Video.

Never having danced a solo, Parish was intimidated by the offer but, after some gentle persuasion, flew to Russia to take up his place.

 

This week, the 28-year-old returns to the UK to star in three ballets at the Covent Garden - as Romeo, Prince Siegfried in Swan Lake and George Balanchine's Apollo.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 07:55 AM

A Kaiser Health News feature on ballet-related injuries.

The annual injury rates at ballet companies run between 67 and 95 percent, according to a study by the American Journal of Sports Medicine.  But ballerinas and their male counterparts often dance through the pain.

 

“You’re kind of raised with the idea that you’re stronger than any pain you feel,” said Noelle, who once danced with a 103-degree fever that led to her hospitalization with pneumonia.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 08:02 AM

A review of the Mariinsky Ballet by Laura Thompson in The Daily Telegraph.

 

Although he dances Siegfried (in Swan Lake) and Balanchine’s Apollo in London, Parish is still a second soloist. Yet on the evidence of his Romeo he has the gifts to progress. He has elevation, a lovely soft leap, and exquisite arms in the Russian style. He has stage presence, an ability to commune and command, and a noble épaulement that is again very Russian. Interestingly, however, he does not quite fit with the rest of the company. Despite the intensity of his Mariinsky training, his Royal Ballet background somehow seeps out. He has a naturalness, an impulse to let the drama direct the dancing, that is at odds with this static, over-long production, choreographed in 1940 by Leonid Lavrovsky.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 05:31 AM

A story on the protests by Ukrainian-American locals at the Bolshoi Ballet performances in Saratoga.

 

About 30 people held signs, Ukrainian flags and sung songs outside the entrance to the Saratoga Performing Arts Center off Route 50. Some handed out flyers asking for online first-aid kit donations to those attending, but not everyone thought the venue was the proper choice for the protest. 

 

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 05:34 AM

An interview with Gene Schiavone. 

He said it is partly practice. “It’s instinctive, you need to know about the white balance, the lighting and the ISO and the grain, and you try to reduce the grain, and all the technical stuff, but to get that shot it’s timing.”

 

“Everything is timing and I can’t explain it to you, but, I have really good timing,” Schiavone said. Judging his own work, he said, “It’s a fairly perfect photograph. That’s Svetlana Sakarioff, one of the top dancers in the world, and David Hallberg, who used to dance in New York and who is now dancing in Russia.”

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 05:37 AM

Reviews of the English National Ballet.

 

The Daily Express

 

Once she has put aside the vestiges of her recent tragic heroines, Rojo reveals immaculate comic timing as she shifts from innocent delight to pouting petulance.

 

As Franz, Lendorf brings an extraordinarily natural quality to the stage as well as fine dancing. He is one of those rare principals who seems like a real person, even in mid-entrechat, and his partnering of Rojo is assured and confident.

 

 

danceviewtimes

 

Some of Hynd's changes are for the better. Swanilda is now the Burgomaster's daughter rather than living all on her own. She has two particular friends among the usual group and this pair gets to dance the Dawn and Prayer variations in the last act. Better still, the other girls accompany them in their entrances and exits making the two solos part of a complete sequence. I'm less keen on the emendations to the folk dances, but ENB's dancers perform them with such fire and spirit that it seems rather nit-picking to complain.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 05:44 AM

An interview with Li Cunxin.

 

“My world is really the ballet world, but I do go to various Chinese events, in particular for example the Chinese New Year celebrations – everyone goes,” he said.

 

“I’m aware there’s a sizable Chinese community in Brisbane and I think they’re doing their bit to contribute to the society we enjoy today and I’m certainly doing my part contributing through the ballet.”

 

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 05:45 AM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in 'Don Quixote' by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

 

The gypsies, too, camping by the windmill, had no dramatic point, though their various dances were utterly engaging--in Bolshoi land, gypsies even sell with their tambourines.  Kristina Karasyova danced a gypsy solo, interpolated by Kasyan Goleizovsky in 1940.  This fierce and elemental solo, full of rage and despair, looks like it was created from smoke and boulders, a world away from the 19th century hub bub surrounding it.  But it was a world that only the Bolshoi can create and it was an honor to see it.

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 06:02 AM

Reviews of "Push."

 

The Financial Times

 

Choreography that might appear desiccated and unappetising in lesser hands was transformed by her starry presence and by her ability to charge the simplest gestures with meaning. She will be 50 next birthday, but her legs can still lash out like a bullwhip and her torso’s sinewy strength lets her fall back with glacial slowness then return to vertical on super-fast rewind.

 

 

 

The Huffington Post

For dancers, the peaks of artistry and athleticism rarely coincide. But when they do, one amplifies the other, and the result is dazzling.

 

Such was the case Tuesday night at the London Coliseum, where Sylvie Guillem, 49, and Russell Maliphant, 53, reunited for Sadler's Wells' award-winning PUSH. Having earned international acclaim since its premiere in 2005, the evening-length production features four works created and danced by Maliphant and Guillem: three solos, and one glorious duet.

 

 

The Daily Telegraph

 

But left until last is Maliphant’s masterpiece, a piece so pure in its essence, so entrancing in its synchronicity that its 32-minutes pass by in a flash. The pair create a fluid architecture as their bodies cascade over one another’s with a haunting connection. Each phrase is intercut by blackouts, which begin with Guillem perched on Maliphant’s shoulders. For the opening section he keeps her aloft with an inventive sequence of lifts and holds, before they roll around in seamless waves of movement with a trusting strength that hones the gaze. This is dance stripped back to its bare bones, casting its own sweet, perpetual spell.

 

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 06:03 AM

A review of Sylvie Guillem and Russell Maliphant in "Push" by Hanna Weibye for The Arts Desk.

 

Last night’s performance of PUSH at the London Colisem left me exhilarated and downcast in equal measure. Exhilarated because dancer Sylvie Guillem, dancer/choreographer Russell Maliphant and lighting genius Michael Hulls together create the Holy Grail of dance, a blend of intelligence, talent and charisma so stunning and convincing that it seems to trascend description and become sacramental. And downcast because this run is the last of PUSH in London, and so for most of us the last time we’ll ever see it, or perhaps even see Guillem or Maliphant perform.

 

 

Lise Smith's review for Londonist.

 

Push brings the two together in a weight-sharing duet of absolute trust. Guillem rolls down and across Maliphant’s body; she arches back from his shoulders in softly cantilevered falls; he pulls her up from the ground into lifts that seem to simply overlook the laws of gravity. There’s a lovely effortless quality to the movement that springs from a deep connection and chemistry between the two performers. Although there is no narrative as such, Push speaks of intimacy with a lyrical eloquence that the athletic, showy choreography of much modern work lacks.

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 06:07 AM

Documentary filmmaker Robert Drew has died at age ninety.

 

 Over his five-decade career, he also directed such films as The Chair, Faces of November, From Two Men and a War, and Man Who Dances, for which he won an Emmy in 1968. In addition to his numerous awards from various organisations and film festivals, six of Drew's films are archived at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, and two are in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress. 

 

Related.

 

Drew won the 1969 Emmy Award for best documentary for “Man Who Dances “about the stress endured by New York City Ballet's then principal dancer Edward Villella.

 

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:45 PM

A review of the English National Ballet in "Coppelia" by Judith Cruickshank for danceviewtimes.

 

I find Rojo a problematic dancer. No one could deny that she has beauty, style and technique to spare. But all too often, in the classics especially, she appears to view the choreography as merely an opportunity to show how many pirouettes she can squeeze in, or how long she can hold a balance, regardless of the music or what the choreographer is trying to say. But then she will do something, perhaps a port de bras, that is so beautiful it takes your breath away.

 

 

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 03 August 2014 - 10:49 PM

A preview of the 11th season of Fall for Dance.

 

The City Center series opens with a program that includes the world premiere of “Words,” a festival commssion, choreographed by Mark Morris for his ensemble. The other world premieres in the festival are “Ostinato,” Tim Harbour’s choreography for Bill Evans’s 1958 recording, “Peace Piece,” to be performed by the Australian Ballet, and “New Lidberg,” a pas de deux choreographed by Pontus Lidberg for Isabella Boylston and James Whiteside, of American Ballet Theater.

 

 



#15 dirac

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 09:37 AM

A review of "Push" by Louise Levene in The Financial Times.

 

Choreography that might appear desiccated and unappetising in lesser hands was transformed by her starry presence and by her ability to charge the simplest gestures with meaning. She will be 50 next birthday, but her legs can still lash out like a bullwhip and her torso’s sinewy strength lets her fall back with glacial slowness then return to vertical on super-fast rewind.

 

 




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