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What changes are required to the Mariinsky repertoire?


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#46 Amy

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 05:42 PM

In general I don't approve of companies jettisoning their heritage, so while I am not a great fan of Lavrovsky's version, I wouldn`t like to see the Mariinsky drop it. Likewise, I wasn't especially persuaded by Frederick Ashton's version when I saw it, but it is important in having been created outside the influence of Lavrovsky, and I am sorry it has no home today.

 

However, I didn't see the Mariinsky's recent London performances of Romeo and Juliet, which came in for a fair amount of criticism, so I can't really judge whether it's become too creaky.

Oh thanks goodness, somebody else who knows ballet companies should not be jettisoning their heritage! Volcanohunter - you are my star! Thank you darling!!!

 

At least the Royal Ballet is staying true to their heritage whereas the Mariinsky... not so much... People seem to think that the Mariinsky's true heritage is the Soviet-era, but it's actually 19th century Imperial Russia.



#47 Drew

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 06:44 PM

I thought the Lavrosky version (which I saw the Bolshoi dance over a decade ago when they had it in their repertory) had many remarkable qualities it would be a shame to lose. I prefered it to Macmillan's which, like Helene, I find "mind numbingly" dull.  If the Mariinsky can keep it alive, then they they should. I agree in that respect, too, with volcanohunter and Amy -- companies shouldn't just jettison their heritage. I do think that some Soviet ballet is part of the Mariinsky's heritage alongside nineteenth-century imperial Russian ballet which hardly comes down to us in un-Soviet-adulterated form.

 

Putting the original question a little differently: is the Lavrosky's creakiness really inevitable? Maybe, but maybe not with the right dancers and direction and I would want to hope the company could give it the attention it needed.

 

Atlanta ballet danced Maillot's last year and will dance it again this year. in my opinion, it was a good choice for the company--better than the company's previous R&J (by Michael Pink).



#48 Helene

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 08:30 PM

I don't think the Royal Ballet is staying true to its heritage:  Ashton just about shriveled up and died there.



#49 Amour

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 10:07 PM

Coppelia! Hard to believe but the Mariinsky doesn't have Coppelia in the repertoire.

I was about to make the same suggestion! From what I understand they haven't perform this classic ballet in years!! Unbelievable. And base on this youtube video of the Dawn variation I think Mariinsky version of this ballet would be wonderful.
 

This is the Vinogradov Coppelia choreographed in the early '90's (I have the DVD). Maybe when he left as AD, he took it with him?

#50 Amour

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Posted 28 October 2014 - 10:20 PM

Hello!  I'm new here but not shy about sharing my opinions. :happy:
The version danced by the fabulous Irina Shapchits was the first version of that variation I ever saw.  Now viewing the version danced by Stashkevich, I'm underwhelmed.  It seems pedestrian in contrast, as reconstructions tend to be, imo.  The choreographer of the version danced by Shapchits seems to have breathed new life into it.


I love Shapchits, too! But she came in just as the "basketball player" aesthetic was taking hold at MT. Unfortunate. I wonder where she is now (somewhere in the West, I believe).

#51 Mashinka

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 02:24 AM

Sadly Helene is right, but the flame still flickers at the Birmingham Royal Ballet, their recent revival of Helpmann's  Miracle in the Gorbals showed that heritage still matters to David Bintley.



#52 Amy

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 03:41 AM

I thought the Lavrosky version (which I saw the Bolshoi dance over a decade ago when they had it in their repertory) had many remarkable qualities it would be a shame to lose. I prefered it to Macmillan's which, like Helene, I find "mind numbingly" dull.  If the Mariinsky can keep it alive, then they they should. I agree in that respect, too, with volcanohunter and Amy -- companies shouldn't just jettison their heritage. I do think that some Soviet ballet is part of the Mariinsky's heritage alongside nineteenth-century imperial Russian ballet which hardly comes down to us in un-Soviet-adulterated form.

 

Putting the original question a little differently: is the Lavrosky's creakiness really inevitable? Maybe, but maybe not with the right dancers and direction and I would want to hope the company could give it the attention it needed.

 

Atlanta ballet danced Maillot's last year and will dance it again this year. in my opinion, it was a good choice for the company--better than the company's previous R&J (by Michael Pink).

Yeah, some of the Soviet ballets are also part of the Mariinsky heritage and some of them are really lovely. I did enjoy Lavrovsky's R&J, although I can see why the British critics found fault with it - they also said it was the lead dancers who saved the version, so it's clearly thanks to the dancers that it goes well every time the Mariinsky performs it.

 

Maybe rather than replacing it altogether, someone could instead take a leaf out of Petipa's book and revive it? Make some changes in places where it does feel necessary?



#53 Amy

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Posted 29 October 2014 - 03:47 AM

I don't think the Royal Ballet is staying true to its heritage:  Ashton just about shriveled up and died there.

Maybe you're right - they do still dance his works, but even now, it's really difficult to get a proper hold of his style and technique.



#54 Lidewij

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 01:35 AM

I love Shapchits, too! But she came in just as the "basketball player" aesthetic was taking hold at MT. Unfortunate. I wonder where she is now (somewhere in the West, I believe).


I believe she is teaching in Portugal now. She is known under her husbands' name (Irina Zavialova)

#55 Amy

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 05:38 AM

Well everybody, after hearing everyone's opinion and a bit of thinking, I think maybe Lavrovsky's Romeo and Juliet is one that needs to stay untouched after all. :)



#56 sandik

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Posted 30 October 2014 - 10:32 AM

Sadly Helene is right, but the flame still flickers at the Birmingham Royal Ballet, their recent revival of Helpmann's  Miracle in the Gorbals showed that heritage still matters to David Bintley.


I was so interested to hear about that production -- we've lost so many ballets from that period, so it's particularly sweet when something is still in active repertory.

#57 leonid17

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 06:38 AM

I seem to have got rather lost where to post this link for "La Fille mal Gardee."

 

Here is a description of a performance which regrettably, I would not cross the road to see considering the casting for Widow Simone as a ridiculous giant.

 

Is it an abuse of power on Mr. Tsikaridze part?

 

 

http://izvestia.ru/news/578638



#58 leonid17

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Posted 02 November 2014 - 07:33 AM

I don't think the Royal Ballet is staying true to its heritage:  Ashton just about shriveled up and died there.

I think many devotees of Sir Fred would agree.

 

More than once or twice we got into a discussion about a performance and he would get hold of my hand and slap it fairly gently as if I was a naughty boy and said, " It's too late for me to fight but I believe there will always be some colleagues who will continue to support my works and the best of the companies works which after all, it was my created works that fully established the company in a way that others couldn't quite achieve."

 

There were many who shed tears at his Westminster Abbey Memorial Service.




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