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Friday, July 18


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14 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 02:39 PM

Reviews of San Francisco Ballet

 

The Daily Telegraph

 

 

And the entire company rose to the challenges of the final work, Jerome Robbins’s Glass Pieces, created in 1983 when the choreographer was 65, yet revealing such instinctive modernism that it still looks entirely contemporary. Against a setting of yellow graph paper that the choreographer himself created with Ronald Bates, the dancers criss-cross the stage with firm purpose and long, bent-legged strides.

 

The Guardian

 

 

SFB can seem to encapsulate the repertory of several companies, given the number of new ballets they regularly commission. And this summer, during their three-week residency at the Théâtre du Châtelet, they might well be beating some kind of record, dancing no less than 16 one-act ballets, including recently created works by Alexei Ratmansky and Christopher Wheeldon, and the latest ballet by Liam Scarlett, whose Hummingbird is set to the Tirol Concerto for Piano and Orchestra by Philip Glass.

 

 

The Arts Desk

 

 

Having a strong company style is usually no bad thing, especially if – as with San Francisco Ballet – the main component of it is a commitment to excellence. It has been impressive watching the gritty energy with which, night after night, the American visitors to Paris dish up meaty triple bills (most pieces coming in at 35 minutes or longer) and serve them with éclat. Polish and professionalism like this help dancers keep going through a gruelling tour, and ensure audiences go away happy. But you can have too much of a good thing.

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 02:42 PM

Recommendations of Shakespeare-derived ballets on DVD from Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

 

This fresh reimagining by Sweden’s Ek, premiered by the Royal Swedish Ballet in 2013 and filmed that same year, pairs a futuristic Euro look with lush sensuality. The Capulets cruise by on Segways. Mercutio is a towering bully, with wide-flung energy; he ripples his whole body like a great billowing cape. Tybalt is a pantherlike ladies’ man. Its modernity and brutality may not be to everyone’s taste, but if you like the clean lines and style of Nordic design, you just might love it. I do.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 03:21 PM

An appraisal of David Hallberg by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

It’s not just a matter of how he looks and stands: His virtues grow when he dances, thanks to the purity and singing lyricism of his line and the dazzling clarity of his execution. When he strikes an arabesque (extending one leg behind him), he addresses a space far beyond the proscenium arch, larger than the stage, and becomes a work of ideal geometry himself. While other dancers are gymnasts, his glory is mixed with an element of restraint; he has composure within exultance. In many ways he evokes the famous phrase with which Chaucer described one character in “The Canterbury Tales”: a “verray, parfit, gentil knyght” — a “true, complete, courteous knight.”

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 18 July 2014 - 03:24 PM

An interview with sports psychologist and former Bolshoi dancer Misha Botting.

One area of work Misha is particularly proud of is the Institute of Sport's role with injured athletes. "Coming back from injury is a massive thing for rugby and in ballet it's the same," he says. "At the institute, we sit down as a team and put together a plan of action for the rehabilitation of an athlete.

 

"So the athlete shouldn't think of themselves as an injured person but as a full-time athlete in rehabilitation...."

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:06 PM

David Hallberg is the guest of honor at a private dinner held at Lincoln Center.

Among those who took in the Bolshoi, followed by dinner at Lincoln were the art dealer Jeffrey Deitch, curator Neville Wakefield, Teen Vogue editor Amy Astley and the fashion designers Prabal Gurung, Derek Lam and Rosie Assoulin.

 

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:08 PM

A review of Ballet 2014/Daniel Ulbricht by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

The program’s sole premiere, Emery LeCrone’s “Opus 19. Andante,” is an entirely generic Romantic duet. Emily Kitka and Russell Janzen danced it prettily. The program’s one solo, Larry Keigwin’s 2013 “Sunshine,” is a showcase for Mr. Ulbricht’s supercharged technique. As a dance to the slow groove of Bill Withers’s “Ain’t No Sunshine,” it’s a bit manic, and its matching of the song’s repeated phrase with as many turns is more than a bit obvious, but as a crowd-pleaser, the piece worked.

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:11 PM

An interview with Svetlana Lunkina.

Of course, great interpreters of a role can disagree on certain points. Lunkina’s first Giselle rehearsal mistress was the great Soviet-era ballerina Ekaterina Maximova. When Lunkina went to Rome, she was rehearsed by an equally eminent Italian Giselle, Carla Fracci. Some of the Italian’s tips made their way into Lunkina’s interpretation.

 

“When I came home, Ekaterina Sergeyevna (Maximova) would say, ‘What’s this you added? And what’s that?’ ”laughed Lunkina....

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:17 PM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet by Marina Harss for DanceTabs.

 

The two casts July 16 and 17 coped with these limitations with varying degrees of success. On July 16, Anna Nikulina, a leading soloist, was pretty and technically solid but disconnected, her mind too occupied by the choreography to think of anything else. If she ever made contact with her partner, I didn’t catch it. Furthermore, Nikulina’s dancing failed to fill the long tensile lines of Tchaikovsky’s music. Her Siegfried, Artem Ovcharenko (a principal) danced with pleasing lightness and elegance, but gave no inkling of turmoil, either in his acting (non-existent) or his dancing. He was a blank page. Needless to say, their love story never ignited.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:26 PM

A review of Ballet 2014 at Jacob's Pillow by Janine Parker in The Boston Globe.

 

It’s hard to imagine Robbins’s “Fancy Free” without Oliver Smith’s iconic set, and thankfully, despite the Pillow’s smallish stage, there it is, along with Kermit Love’s inimitable costumes. It’s generous of Angle, Fairchild, and Ulbricht, portraying the “three sailors on shore leave,” to give up so much space, but they make do with a brilliant equanimity. The men’s timing, both comic and musical, is fabulous: From those first exuberant cartwheels in, they each offer variations on a playful theme, Angle goofily charming, Fairchild mischievous, and Ulbricht puckish. The scrapes they get into over the women — Peck, again so right with Angle in the duet, and Georgina Pazcoguin, elegantly haughty on the surface, but burning for adventure — are just cirrus clouds on an otherwise heavenly horizon.

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:27 PM

A review of the Diaghilev Festival of Ballet by Neil Norman in The Daily Express.

With his thatch of blonde hair and colourful trailing scarves, Liepa resembles a cuddly Boris Johnson and his introductions to each work are characterised by a wide-eyed passion and enthusiasm.

 

All too often, though, the actual works look like museum pieces and the dancing is not always of the highest calibre. Following a rare opportunity to see Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera/ballet The Golden Cockerel, programme 2 is a tribute to choreographer Michael Fokine - the man who introduced eastern exoticism to the austere aesthetics of the classical repertoire.

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 20 July 2014 - 11:29 PM

A preview of Dance Theatre of Harlem by Molly Glentzer in The Houston Chronicle.

But they seem to have found a niche. The smaller size enables more presenters to book them, and the company is touring about 15 weeks a year - more than Johnson anticipated. Artistically, it's very much like the company that existed for 38 years, she said. Johnson aims to develop dancers who have ballet at their core but can be expressive in many styles. They've all learned the eclectic repertory - which mixes classical, neoclassical, modern and contemporary dance works - since last year.

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 10:19 AM

A review of Dance Masters by Stephan Bonfield in The Calgary Herald.

 

Co-partnered with eight ballet companies, whose artistic directors send their best representative young talent annually to Banff for summer residencies, Dance Masters has presented provocative compilations of what these young artists have learned from their on-stage experiences since 2008. Under the careful watch of director Lindsay Fischer, the program has grown steadily, offering a deeply challenging summer experience to its participants, consisting of performing difficult works that very often places dancers in lead roles that stretch their artistic boundaries.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 21 July 2014 - 10:25 AM

A feature on the current state and possible future of the Merce Cunningham repertory by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

One of the many ways in which Balanchine changed dance history is in how he bequeathed his ballets to friends and colleagues. His dances, he acknowledged, were likely to have future lives beyond any one home company. With this in mind, the Balanchine Trust was instituted in 1987. It soon became the world’s leading example, helping to propagate his works internationally, so that they’re danced by companies to whom they seemed alien in his lifetime.

 

The legacy of the choreographer Martha Graham was wracked by a bitter posthumous multimillion-dollar lawsuit between her heir, Ron Protas, and her company. Though the troupe has survived, it can no longer perform some of her dances. What seriousness the others retain onstage remains a matter of controversy.

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 11:50 AM

Yonah Acosta is appointed principal dancer at English National Ballet.

 

He added: “It’s not about my uncle, it’s not about my name. Everyone compares me with my uncle but we’re different dancers, we’re different people. I don’t think about it.”

 



#15 dirac

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Posted 24 July 2014 - 12:12 PM

A preview of the Vail International Dance Festival.

Of course, they all get to showcase their own work, too. That can mean a revival of a 20th-century favorite, like choreographer George Balanchine's "Jewels," which the Pennsylvania Ballet is scheduled to perform July 30, or the recent developments, like the "Restless Creature" dances that ballet superstar Wendy Whelan commissioned for herself in 2013 that she'll revive on Aug. 6.

 

Or it can mean completely fresh pieces. BalletX will present a new work Aug. 4 that's not even been made yet, according to company founder Christine Cox. BalletX's own Matthew Neenan is devising the moves and will put together the 20-minute piece on site with the company's 10 dancers.

 




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