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Misty Copeland - Divided ViewsWas, ABT on Tour - Casting for Austrailia


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#256 Helene

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Posted Yesterday, 06:22 AM

I think Lane was cast early on as the lead in SB because of her strong technique, which is also why she was cast in Theme & Variations.  She can handle technically demanding choreography, and so she has, in the past, received parts which are technically challenging.

McKenzie said:

 

I’m a firm believer that, no matter how talented you are when you’re young, there’s a certain amount of life experience you can’t accelerate. Misty could have done these same roles—technically—ten years ago, but she wouldn’t have been ready.

 

Granted, my exposure to Lane has been limited, but I've never seen or read much to suggest that Lane was an interpretive prodigy to justify an early Aurora using the same criterion.

 

 


She told the Daily Mail that

I think that the reason [it's hard for black women to break in] is the racism and not wanting to change this very traditional art form that has been successful in the way it is for so long

 

Since she says “reason,” singular, she seems to see the two things that follow as one and the same. In other words, traditionalists are racists. Now granted, traditionalism can be a cover for racism (among other things), but she just equates the two, plain and simple.

 

I think that is a stretch.  "The reason is" followed by a list is a grammatical mistake I've seen regularly in writing, whether that be on message boards, blogs, or poorly copy-edited (semi)-professional writing, let alone interviews where an interviewee is responding to a question in the moment verbally.

 

I think the two things are linked, especially since most traditionalists -- your word, not hers -- don't go farther than "What I saw the first time" plus perhaps "What I can see on video" and don't have much of an historical or accurate view of what that tradition is or the evolution of the art form, like thinking that what the Bolshoi or Mariinsky puts on the stage in classics today is what Petipa choreographed, or that the extensions perpetrated on us by lithe white dancers in the traditional rep would be recognizable even by the generation of coaches in Moscow or St. Petersburg.  "Traditionalists" can be rather selective about what they include in tradition.



#257 vipa

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Posted Yesterday, 06:22 AM

 

I think it's always good to analyze what factors lead to certain dancers being cast in certain roles. Isn't this board about examining details and critical thinking?  Exchanging ideas? 

 

I think Lane was cast early on as the lead in SB because of her strong technique, which is also why she was cast in Theme & Variations.  She can handle technically demanding choreography, and so she has, in the past, received parts which are technically challenging.

I've also read criticisms of her that say her dancing is dull.  Clearly Lane's fans disagree. Yet some folks behave as if their opinions are facts.

 

I don't believe that most people who follow ballet feel  that the difference in skill among the female soloists at ABT is so stark that Copeland landing leads amounts to some form of robbery. To me, such accusations verge on the hysterical. 

 

It's not like Stella Abrera  and Sarah Lane are Judi Dench and Maggie Smith to Misty's Meagan Fox. The difference in ability among the three is not that vast. 

 

If the difference in ability is truly not that vast, we come back to the question of why Misty was given O/O.



#258 Tapfan

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Posted Yesterday, 06:27 AM


 

I think it's always good to analyze what factors lead to certain dancers being cast in certain roles. Isn't this board about examining details and critical thinking?  Exchanging ideas? 

 

I think Lane was cast early on as the lead in SB because of her strong technique, which is also why she was cast in Theme & Variations.  She can handle technically demanding choreography, and so she has, in the past, received parts which are technically challenging.

Isn't that circular logic?  Why not give her a chance. They've all been given chances.



#259 dirac

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Posted Yesterday, 09:39 AM

aurora wrote: 

Misty waited much longer for a lead role in a full length than Sarah did. So can we please stop acting like she has been receiving some outrageous favoritism, when there is simply no evidence of any such thing.

 

 

It's not favoritism. She's clubbing McKenzie into submission with her blunt instrument. smile.png


Edited by dirac, Today, 06:30 AM.
Edited to add the comment by aurora to which I was responding.


#260 Helene

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Posted Yesterday, 10:06 AM

It's not favoritism. She's clubbing McKenzie into submission with her blunt instrument. smile.png

laugh.png



#261 balabanov11

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Posted Yesterday, 08:30 PM

Of the 3 of them, Misty is CLEARLY the one most suited for O/O, as she has the most beautiful legs and feet of the three, for a short girl her legs are proportionally very long, and she has a killer developee and extension. 

 

And the idea of Stella Abrera mastering the technical demands of O/O are rather ludicrous - she can barely get thru the technical demands of Gamzatti. There is absolutely NO reason why Misty shouldn't have been given O/O among the three of them. 



#262 kfw

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Posted Today, 01:06 PM

Since she says “reason,” singular, she seems to see the two things that follow as one and the same. In other words, traditionalists are racists. Now granted, traditionalism can be a cover for racism (among other things), but she just equates the two, plain and simple.

 

Helene wrote:

I think that is a stretch.  "The reason is" followed by a list is a grammatical mistake I've seen regularly in writing, whether that be on message boards, blogs, or poorly copy-edited (semi)-professional writing, let alone interviews where an interviewee is responding to a question in the moment verbally.

 

You may be right, but it’s not uncommon for writers and editors to make simple grammar fixes (and this is the New Yorker, after all). The author, who knew the context of the remark, may have thought she meant it how she said it.

 

I think the two things are linked, especially since most traditionalists -- your word, not hers -- don't go farther than "What I saw the first time" plus perhaps "What I can see on video" and don't have much of an historical or accurate view of what that tradition is or the evolution of the art form, like thinking that what the Bolshoi or Mariinsky puts on the stage in classics today is what Petipa choreographed, or that the extensions perpetrated on us by lithe white dancers in the traditional rep would be recognizable even by the generation of coaches in Moscow or St. Petersburg.  "Traditionalists" can be rather selective about what they include in tradition.

 

I don’t see how someone thinking they know a tradition but being mistaken makes them racist. However I’ve seen plenty of people give other reasons for what I couldn’t understand as anything else but racism.



#263 yudi

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Posted Today, 03:00 PM

Does anyone have a video clip that shows Misty Copeland as Odette in it?
 
From the talks and video clips I saw, I believe she could be a technique-superior dancer, if not now,maybe, in the future. But, I would love to see those ballet performances in which the dancers are not only technically OK, but also their dancing could portray the roles well in performing emotion and style. Classical ballet performance is not simply movements of legs, arms, jumps and turns, that all of you in this forum know much better than I do. I saw short clips of Misty Copeland as firebird, I am convinced. But, for Odette, I have not seen anything.  
 
I also think that body as the ballet dancer's instrument, its lines and motion sing with different tones, just like human-voices have tones as tenor, baritone, bass, soprano, mezzo and alto. Better not let a bass sign Alfredo in La Traviata, or a mezzo/alto sing Violetta. As a matter of fact, when the A.D. of a ballet theater assign roles to dancers, she/he would always think about if a dancer fit a role in both technique and style. Each ballet has its own style and harmony. In the classical Swan Lake, a young tender lady as princess Odette is expected, I would not like to see an aggressive Odette, or even a mother-goose or duck in the center of corps of young lady swans in Act II. 
innocent.gif
The race issue is very sensitive or over-sensitive in the US, I understand that very well for I am an asian. However, when I read the discussion "Why does City Ballet have so few dancers of East Asian descent?" I thought, probably just because most of asian dancers don;t fit into the NYCB's style. Yuan Yuan Tan is too special. In general, asian ballerinas have softer body lines and lighter dancing style, not like the typical Balanchine ballerinas.
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