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The Millepied Era at the Paris Opera Ballet


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#76 Rock

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 02:02 PM

sandik - can you be more specific about skills and composition techniques that can be taught?



#77 sandik

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 05:06 PM

There are tools that you can use to help generate movement (to make up sequences) and then there are other tools you can use to develop that material, to create shorter phrases and longer sections with stylistic consistency or structural integrity.  In the same way that a composer can learn craft, a choreographer can learn similar skills.  I see a lot of work from young choreographers, of all styles.  Many of them are still struggling with making a dance, rather than making strings of movement. 



#78 volcanohunter

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Posted 03 November 2014 - 05:12 PM

There are skills that can be taught and composition techniques that can be learned, but those don't always get communicated in the rush to get a piece onstage.

 

Yes, I would hope there would be more to it than giving nascent choreographers a copy of The Art of Making Dances and telling them to get on with it!

 

A lot of dancers are choreagraphing for side shows but I don't think all dancers are able to do that (it needs some talent, no?) and are interesting to do it (that's not their job anyway)...

 

The upside (or perhaps downside) of teaching basic choreographic techniques is that even people without much choreographic talent can learn to put together a respectable piece. I can think of a few choreographers in this category. They're a little like composers who understand harmony, counterpoint and orchestration, but who can't write a tune. There also aren't that many 18-year-olds studying dance in college or university who are very interested in choreography at that stage of their lives, while they're still focused on preparing for a performing career. But since choreographers come from the ranks of dancers, theoretically some of the techniques they learned and the practical experience they gained in composition courses could become useful later on, if they should develop an interest in choreography.



#79 miliosr

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 04:40 PM

Since you mentioned the Art of Making Dances, volcanohunter, I would love to see more choreographers of Doris Humphrey's caliber acting as in-house editors for young choreographers, much as Humphrey did for Jose Limon and many others in the early decades of the modern dance.  Their first words of advice to young choreographers could be to repeat Humphrey's famous maxim:  "All dances are too long."



#80 sandik

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 11:27 PM

I encourage young choreographers to find mentors, but it's a tricky process, especially in smaller communities.

#81 tomorrow

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 05:48 AM

Philippe Villin, head of AROP, isn't happy his - as the hip kids say - 'BFF' Nicolas Le Riche didn't get the job, nor is he happy with where the company's going. He seems to insinuate Stephane Lissner didn't give Nicolas Le Riche a fair chance. The same with Laurent Hilaire, I wonder? http://tinyurl.com/nvkurk3

Google Translate isn't great so for the French speakers amongst, does it says Villin has left the company? "Drove to" specifically. This is one of the most well-connected members of the Paris elite, by the way...

#82 silvermash

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 08:09 AM

I'm not sure to understand what is the purpose of this article, nor what Philippe Villin aimed at... He's not the head of AROP but was (it seems from the paper he's not anymore) an important patron. Arop (friends of Paris opera ballet) gathers a lot of money for the Paris opera and some members are very involved in the life of the institution, sometimes there is thin line between what you can do as a patron and what you can't. From what I read, they can't choose the artistic director of the ballet company but it looks like he thought he could...biggrin.png



#83 tomorrow

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 08:49 AM

I think he is still AROP's president or deputy but either way he isn't somebody you want to cross. His attacks on and personal campaign to have N. Joel fired were pretty horrific.

#84 silvermash

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 09:56 AM

Jean-Louis Beffa is president and Jean-Yves Kaced is deputy.



#85 tomorrow

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 11:02 AM

Ah OK, I could have sworn he was (once?) involved in AROP's administration but clearly not. It's amusing the power people with money think they have, no? ;)

#86 ballet_n00b

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 11:45 AM

I also fail to see the point of this "article", just an opportunity to talk about himself and take gratuitous shots at people.

 



#87 silvermash

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 12:57 PM

It's an economic journal. Perhaps there is no point,  just because he's again under the spotlights. He hired one of  Nicolas Le Riche shows at the Théâtre des Champs Elysées for a private party wink1.gif




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