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The Millepied Era at the Paris Opera Ballet


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#136 miliosr

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 11:36 AM

at Dupont's farewell, he addressed Benjamin Pech as Bernard Pech.

Bwahahaha.  That's almost as good (bad) as David Koch referring to ABT artistic director as "Peter" (as in Martins) at an ABT event.

 

I went back to the very first post (mine) in this thread and I noticed that one of the programming ideas Millepied mentioned in The New Yorker profile didn't come to pass.  This was the proposed evening of "silent" ballets by William Forsythe, Emanuel Gat and Jerome Robbins.  There must have been significant pushback from the musicians.



#137 sandik

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Posted 25 May 2015 - 07:13 PM

I went back to the very first post (mine) in this thread and I noticed that one of the programming ideas Millepied mentioned in The New Yorker profile didn't come to pass.  This was the proposed evening of "silent" ballets by William Forsythe, Emanuel Gat and Jerome Robbins.


Yet. He could still be contemplating it.

#138 miliosr

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:10 AM

I question how great an idea an evening of silent ballets was in the first place. I don't think they would have gained anything from each other. I would argue that each one would have been 2/3rds less interesting that it would have been if it appeared on a mixed bill with two other works set to music.

#139 sandik

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Posted 27 May 2015 - 09:47 AM

It works both ways, for me. I know when I've seen "Moves" in a mixed bill with other works that use a conventional score, it takes me a while to 'hear' the rhythm of the movement without the tick-tock metronome in my ear. Once I get there, I wind up with a very specific kinesthetic reaction, but it feels like I'm supplying a "score" for the work. The times I've seen a whole program of silent works, I've had more time to really examine the relationship between the movement and the rhythmic structures it creates.

What it comes down to, I think, is that a single work feels more like a novelty -- a group of them feels more like a genre. Like programming a trio of works to Bach, or a group of solos. You learn more about the unifying theme or element by seeing the variety of iterations.
 



#140 canbelto

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Posted 01 June 2015 - 08:04 PM

Here's a rather extended interview with Claude Bessy:

 

http://www.ismeneb.c...ks_frankly.html




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