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Tuesday, June 24


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#1 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 04:49 PM

How difficult is ballet? An answer from Slate.

That kind of damage comes from spending hours a day training. They move as if they don't weigh anything at all, but that's a carefully crafted illusion: They move that way because they are intensely strong. They combine that strength with a grace that comes from practicing the same moves over and over and over until it looks as if it's weightless.

 

It breaks a body. Most ballet dancers are completely shot by their mid-20s, and many will suffer lifelong disabilities from the effort.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 04:50 PM

William Forsythe coaches Boston Ballet in "The Second Detail."

But last month Mr. Forsythe announced that as of September 2015, he will no longer run his company. Instead he will teach at the University of Southern California’s Glorya Kaufman School of Dance, coach companies performing his earlier work and — the dance world waits — perhaps take on commissions.

 

“I haven’t committed fully to any new work yet,” he said in an interview after a rehearsal. “At the moment, I’m dealing with injuries myself and trying to get back to the point when I can actually dance.”

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 04:52 PM

A review of the English National Ballet in "Romeo and Juliet" by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

 

Of the two, Ms. Klimentova is a far greater actor. Mr. Muntagirov’s facial expressions are limited; he presents a kind of stoic impassivity in the face of trouble. But his dancing, particularly with Ms. Klimentova, is as impassioned and uninhibited as one might wish, and the emotions washing across Ms. Klimentova’s features seem to speak for both of them in a way that feels psychologically right.

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 04:53 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in "Swan Lake" by Siobhan Burke in The New York Times.

 

The night’s unplanned drama was unfortunately its most engrossing. This production, staged by Kevin McKenzie in 2000, lumbers along, padded with rituals that feel more obligatory than necessary, particularly in Act I, Siegfried’s birthday party. Garlands are bestowed, chalices raised and chalices raised again. At times the music felt too slow, the dancers eager to race ahead of it. But as always, select performers transcended those structural issues. As Benno, Joseph Gorak was good-natured and technically impeccable, establishing a cheerful camaraderie with Sarah Lane and the breezy Yuriko Kajiya in Act I. Jared Matthews, as von Rothbart in Act III, blazed through the court with predatory malice.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 04:55 PM

A preview of the summer season in New York dance by Pia Catton in The Wall Street Journal.

 

The depth of the 2014 summer season is the result of a confluence of programming choices made separately by Lincoln Center Festival, which is presenting the Bolshoi, and the Koch Theater, which has been filling its stage with dance since New York City Opera left its hall in 2011.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 04:57 PM

Jacque LeWarne of Des Moines Ballet will compete on "So You Think You Can Dance."

 

LeWarne will have her work cut out for her Wednesday, but ballet dancers consistently do well on "So You Think You Can Dance." In season 9, both the winner and the runner-up specialized in ballet. Here's a look at LeWarne's background:

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 05:00 PM

Pierre Lockett leaves his post as Director of Community Engagement.

 

Lockett, 54, departs the Joffrey to continue his extensive work with youth in Chicago Public Schools, the Chicago Park District and service organizations, all with the intention of bringing dance to children who are not typically exposed to the art form. He expects to concentrate his efforts in the Bronzeville community (where he resides), partnering with the Mandrake Park, Quads Community Development Center, and several schools in the area.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 05:04 PM

Photos of John Lam.

 

Among the Boston Ballet company's brightest stars is soloist John Lam, a member of the troupe since 2003. A son of Vietnamese immigrants, Lam lives in Boston with his husband and their young son.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 08:46 AM

The artist Mark Wallinger writes about his love for ballet.

 

As an artist, I'm drawn to things that play with perception or perspective, and that lean towards the classical, seeking some kind of autonomy from their author. Classicism is a rubric, a set of principles, a tradition – the baton being passed on. Classical dance has its own rules and grammar: something to use, but also something to kick against.

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 08:48 AM

A preview of Boston Ballet in New York by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

 

The full company has not appeared in New York since 1983, when Rudolf Nureyev headlined in performances of "Don Quixote." Nissinen says that today the troupe doesn’t need high-profile guests or a classical warhorse to sell itself, however. While Boston Ballet performs evening-length classics at home, the Finnish-born director believes that New York audiences are sophisticated enough to savor mixed bills of neo-classical and contemporary pieces.

 

 




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