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Monday, June 23


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9 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 11:43 AM

Q&A with Jeffrey and Lia Cirio.

 

When did you first become interested in dance?

 

Jeffrey: My sister was serious about ballet, so my parents decided to enroll her in the Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet (CPYB), which required us to move to Carlisle. Pennsylvania for her training. I had always been involved in sports and martial arts, but at CPYB I saw guys dancing for the first time and decided to take a class.

 

Lia: Ever since I can remember, all I wanted to do was dance. My mom loves to tell the story of when I was born. Because I was feet first and refused to flip, she had to have me as an emergency C-section baby. When I was finally born the doctor exclaimed, "I think you have a dancer on your hands!"

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 11:44 AM

A review of Ballet Preljocaj in "Les Nuits" by Mark Swed in The Los Angeles Times.

 

"Les Nuits" is not likely, in the end, to please feminists nor multiculturalists. Despite the many variations on dominance and submission, men remain in control and women work their wiles. The music reveals just how powerful the Western influence is. Bishai's beats inevitably act as devices of masculine empowerment, while Atlas' Arabic embellishments function in a purely feminine way of working musical wiles.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 04:44 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in "Giselle" by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

 

At the Wednesday matinee came something fresher: the New York debut of the soloist Isabella Boylston. Her Giselle was an American girl and endearingly so, old-fashioned but not Old World. From the start, her jumps were excitingly springy, and the gentle abandon of her upper body expressed a happiness that was infectious.

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 04:45 PM

A former ballet dancer writes about transitioning to the world of business.

 

At 25, however, I began to think about a life outside of ballet. I began to wonder if I had achieved as much as I could in the dance world – and I wanted to eat a proper meal again. I knew I wanted to stay in a creative world but I was also interested in business. I managed to convince a balletomane to give me a chance in an advertising agency.

 

Related.

 

It’s not often you hear a high-ranking executive at a tech company discuss the merits of classical ballet as a business metaphor, but Bonita Coleman Stewart isn’t your typical leader.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 04:46 PM

John Lam of Boston Ballet talks about fatherhood.
 

The “we” refers to his husband, John Ruggieri, a lawyer. The two married in Vermont in 2010 and recently expanded their family to include Giovanni, known affectionately as Gio.

 

“I’ve always wanted kids,” says Lam, who grew up in a large Vietnamese family in Marin, California. “Having our own baby is, like, awesome.” And a challenge too, of course. Lam admits that being a father “is a job and it’s hard but at the same time, it’s not. I enjoy it.”

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 04:49 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in "Cinderella" by Carol Pardo for danceviewtimes.

 

This performance of "Cinderella" was built on a rock solid foundation as both leads made their characters alive as soon as we saw them. Kent’s Cinderella, banished to the fireside, needed only the angle of her head and gaze to reveal her grief and wistfulness, and the power of her memories of happier times. From his first silent jump into the ballroom, Gomes was warm, gracious and inclusive, a genuinely nice guy who deserved to marry the right girl and for love. With both dancers, empathy flowed across the footlights. Their fate mattered; their fairy tale was utterly believable.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 05:24 AM

A review of Australian Ballet by Stephanie Glickman in The Herald Sun.

The dancers are fired up — enjoying themselves and looking the best they have in ages. It’s unadulterated ballet technique, en masse and on the mark.

 

Imperial Suite is a double-hander of George Balanchine’s Ballet Imperial and Serge Lifar’s Suite En Blanc. Both are large ensembles of one-act, non-narrative ballet showcasing fancy footwork and exquisite formations. Both are born of the early 1940s and celebrate the pure beauty of classical ballet form. In these works, everyone from the principals to the corps de ballet dances hard.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 05:02 PM

The Anderson Young Ballet Theatre loses its Nutcracker costumes in a fire and the company's future is at risk.

LouAnn Young, 84, founded the ballet company more than 40 years ago and says she's hopeful to get the money to purchase new costumes.

 

"I just pray that we get money in so we can at least make the costumes we are so missing," Young said.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 09:42 AM

A profile in brief of Edward Villella.

 

The ballet world knows dancer and choreographer Edward Villella, who served as the chairman of the international jury for the 2014 USA International Ballet Competition, as a legend and a pioneer for male ballet dancers. The New York Times and numerous dance critics have called Villella America's most celebrated dancer of his time. He spent his career working to prove that ballet was not just for the girls, and he succeeded.

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 03 July 2014 - 06:06 AM

A review of Paris Opera Ballet by Patricia Boccadoro for Culturekiosque.

 

There can be no doubt that Millepied’s flowing, lyrical style is ideally suited to a classical narrative ballet, brought bang up to date by a superb contemporary décor, and by choosing the right interpreter for the right role.  His pure, liquid duos, of which a glimpse had been seen in his exquisite work, Closer, 2006, showed his mastery of the pas de deux, with many of the lifts being so fluid that the dancers could almost have been on ice skates. Nothing in his choreography was for show, nothing was tricky or complicated; the focus was on dance and one left the theatre choked with so much beauty.

 

 




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