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Megan Fairchild to Make Her Broadway Debut in "On The Town"


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#76 Mazurka

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 01:41 PM

If I never saw "Vienna Waltzes" or "Union Jack" again, my life would not be materially altered for the worse. I close my eyes for the last three minutes of "Duo Concertant," which I find unspeakably mawkish. (My apologies to the dancers; it's not you -- it's that gimmicky spotlight.)


If I never saw Concerto Barocco my life would be poorer...

I have not seen Ballanchine's entire oeuvre, and I do not like everything to the same degree.  But I eventually will see all of them.  I will do that  before I start making broad generalizations.

If you go to the Barnes collection and see all the Renoires, or even if you go to any retrospective at MOMA - it is apparent that great artists do not put out masterpieces
time and again.

Ballanchine is a phenomenon.  He is an American phenomenon.  I think all tourist who come here and are part of "inteligentsia" should  experience his ballets.

I see no reason to be offended by those who worship him and fail to understand why it ould elicit such antagonism.  He is larger than life and comes from an era, the 1960ies, when we still had those larger than life intellects.  I have not doubt that having lived through the flowering of culture in the 60ies I see Ballanchine differently than those who are younger.
 
Art has many layers and it can be experienced on a straightforward emotional level, or with the understanding of the layers of meaning, which comes with increased connoiseurship,which I am trying to acquire :-).

Recently I saw the sad documentary on Tanaquil Le Clercq, (who more than any other of his dancers epitomized  the ideal Ballanchine body type),  and now I understand completely differently ballets such as Agon, where the ballerina's limbs are being manipulated and placed by the male dancer, or La Valse.

#77 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 05:23 PM

If I never saw Concerto Barocco my life would be poorer...

 
Mine too. That one I do plan on seeing again ...

#78 vipa

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 05:53 PM


There are several works of art that I could say my life would be poorer without.  In Balanchine ballets for me it's Concerto Barocco, Mozartiana, Agon, Serenade and perhaps a few others.  Then there are other Balanchine ballets that bring me enjoyment every time I watch them - Tsch Pas & Theme and Variations are among those.  Balanchine was a genus who created masterpieces, great works, good works and some lemons.  There is no shame it preserving such a body of works.

#79 Quiggin

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 07:39 PM

Many interesting posts, and now I'll add my own biased view to the off-topic.
 
One of the problems with City Ballet is that its heritage is not really American but Russian and French imported by Balanchine – just as the beginnings of American abstract expressionism were brought to the States by Arshile Gorky and Willem de Kooning and modernist architecture in Mies van der Rohe's suitcase. It – NYCB – could be called something else – Ballet Franco-Russe-Amerique, something like that.
 
What gives the works of Balanchine and Ratmansky part of their impact above other choeographers is that they are products of great historical moments (just as Shakespeare was) – Ratmansky of Glasnost and Balanchine of the Russian Revolution 0f 1917. Prodigal Son & Rubies come out of Soviet ideas of the twenties and many of Balanchine's other ballets out of Petipa's ideas. All of City Ballet's Waltz/glove ballets come out of a long chain of developments going back to the early thirties, when they were given their initial impetus by Christian Berard and Boris Kochno, as much as by Balanchine.
 
It's far more interesting I think to look at ballet in these art history overlays than just saying Balanchine was a genius and created ballets out of nothing and now we're all waiting for a new genius from nowhere. They come out of schisms in history and often don't seek the role.
 
And yes to this (except for the omission of Ratmansky):

The most praise of City Ballet these last few years, has come due to the emergence of great dancers, NOT great works.



I don't think I agree with your assessment of NYCB at this time, but your general comment here (dances/dancers) puts a finger on an important point. Without bringing up the chicken/egg discussion, it's very true that we tend to vascilate between periods where great innovations are being made choreographically, and periods where dancers are deeply engaged in revealing the nuances of a role or a work. (which is what kfw says below) In some ways, the performer of an extant work is like the commentator in the literary world -- they aren't creating the work so much as they are showing us what the work can do. Thanks for sending me down this road with your observation.



#80 Helene

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 08:50 PM

While I agree that changes in the arts are caused when the times make them possible and ignite them, the Ballets Russes was an import, but Balanchine was an immigrant who transformed a number of influences he brought with him -- Petipa's classicism, Russian/early Soviet experimental dance, Diaghilev's mixed bill contemporary approach -- through the energy, opportunity, and popular music and arts forms he found into his new home into one branch of neoclassical ballet.  Petipa was an immigrant, too, but he was brought to a Western-facing court where ballet was established, the was a ready-made audience, France was a beacon and the latest flowed from France to Russia, and French was the spoken language.  He had a comparatively soft landing, ballet-wise, even if he had sterner masters and more constraints.  Balanchine's story became an American story, and, like many prominent immigrants, he brought his influences into the mix to cross-pollinate.

 

Kirstein wouldn't have seen the Petipa-like court ballets from Balanchine:  he saw Balanchine's work of the Ballet Russes and Les Ballets 1933 period.  It wasn't "Sleeping Beauty" from either Massine (whom he approached first) or Balanchine that sparked his interest, and it wasn't what the Ballets Russes companies were bringing and that US audiences would recognize from those tours; the age of "Swan Lake" as the gold standard was still a while away.  Kirstein was interested in contemporary art, and a contemporary version of a classical art form is what he got. 



#81 ABT Fan

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 08:08 AM

 

If I never saw Concerto Barocco my life would be poorer...

 
Mine too. That one I do plan on seeing again ...

 

 

Same here.  It's one of my all-time favorites.  And, that score...is well.....magical.



#82 Barbara

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 12:45 PM

This production of On the Town debuted last summer in MA, and this is a transfer.  The production got good reviews.  I believe that every one of the original lead cast members is going to Broadway except the role that Megan is playing.  Don't know what the circumstances were, but I don't think anyone of the original cast got a negative review. Maybe the person that played Megan's role is not available, which caused them to look for a replacement.  In any event, I've heard Megan speak on video, and to be honest she sounds like a young girl with little distinction in public speaking or projection.  I don't kniow if her part is primarily dancing, speaking or singing, but it would seem to me she would have a lot of work to do if much acting and speaking is involved. We'll see what happens. 

 

The theater that this is going to is huge.  I have no idea how they are going to fill all those seats every night. 

 

By the way, there are plenty of discount codes available for previews of this show, if anyone is interested.  Go to theatermania.com or broadwaybox.com to find discount offers.

I've been looking into buying tickets for this through my employer at the Plum Benefits site where tickets seem to be discounted similarly to the two sites Abatt mentions. Unfortunately you cannot select your seats - it's best available seating. So my question for Abatt or anyone who is familiar with the Lyric: Knowing that it's the second largest house on Broadway (according to wikipedia) would Balcony seats be too far from the stage (I don't want to watch the entire show with binoculars)? Or should I bite the bullet and let them choose best seating available in Dress Circle or Orchestra? I would be buying two tickets so cost is a concern. Thanks!



#83 abatt

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 01:07 PM

I think I've only been to this theater once or twice before.  It is huge. The balcony, I believe, is pretty far away and you would need binoculars. Don't recall how far the Dress Circle (first mezz) is. 

 

By the way, the sites I mentioned allow you to select your own seats.

 

Hope that helps a little.



#84 Kathleen O'Connell

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Posted 19 August 2014 - 01:37 PM

I think I've only been to this theater once or twice before.  It is huge. The balcony, I believe, is pretty far away and you would need binoculars. Don't recall how far the Dress Circle (first mezz) is. 

 

By the way, the sites I mentioned allow you to select your own seats.

 

Hope that helps a little.

 

From the "Facility Rentals" section of the Lyric's website: "90 feet from furthest seating point to stage" with capacity for 1,932 persons.  90 feet is about 1/3 the length of a standard New York City block (uptown not crosstown). 

 

The Theater Formerly Known as State seats 2,586. New York City Center seats 2,257. I don't know how far it is from the back of the house to the stage in either venue ...



#85 Razor

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 09:44 PM

 

Tapfan - not sure what you mean by "prep school vibe"?  care to give more context?   tia

NYC Ballet reminds me of that movie Pleasantville.  Everything there seems to be so insular and conformist.

 

I feel the same way!



#86 Tapfan

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Posted 02 September 2014 - 10:28 AM

 

 

Tapfan - not sure what you mean by "prep school vibe"?  care to give more context?   tia

NYC Ballet reminds me of that movie Pleasantville.  Everything there seems to be so insular and conformist.

 

I feel the same way!

 

Please, come sit next to me!  At least, metaphorically! wink1.gif



#87 Razor

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 03:24 AM

Haha, sure... :-P. Just need a ticket.

#88 abatt

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Posted 03 September 2014 - 09:03 AM

Getting back to the topic of this thread, here is an article on the forthcoming production of On The Town, including a rehearsal photo.  Megan is third person from the left.

 

http://www.nytimes.c...&pgtype=article#



#89 abatt

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 05:16 AM

Here is a rehearsal clip from On The Town, which includes a section featuring Megan Fairchild

 

http://playbill.com/...ake-on-broadway



#90 susanger

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Posted 04 September 2014 - 10:55 AM

Is that Stephen Hannah holding Megan Fairchild's right hand as she does that walk on the hands of the other dancers?




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