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Sunday, June 15


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#1 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 04:45 AM

Rebecca Milzoff for the New York Times on the film "Enemy Within":
 
http://www.nytimes.c...tyles.html?_r=0

One evening in 2007, Preston Miller found himself at a birthday party full of crazy talented people. A freshman in Fordham Universitys B.F.A. program with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, he was surrounded by the likes of Wynton Marsalis, Desmond Richardson and a mentor, the Ailey dancer Matthew Rushing. At one point, Mr. Miller recalled, Matthew leaned over to me and said, Man, if we wanted to, we could go out tonight and turn New York out, if we all got together.



#2 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 04:48 AM

Guillaume Cote is interviewed in the Globe and Mail on the secrets to his success:

http://www.theglobea...rticle19163369/

 

I always say that dancing isn’t my job – it’s not a job, it’s a lifestyle. Since the age of 11, I have trained every day. Being a dancer is something you do from the moment you wake up to the second you fall asleep because you are living in your instrument, sort of like if an artist lived in their painting. It’s a wonderful and incredible thing, but it’s something you have to be constantly dedicated to. There are all kinds of sacrifices. I left my family when I was 11; I haven’t taken a real holiday in four years. We have to watch what we eat all the time, you can’t stay up all night, you can’t party on a Friday night, you can’t play most sports. I loved hockey when I was young. That’s something I had to give up because you can’t do anything that could jeopardize your body. I can’t play a casual game of baseball on the weekend because that could take me out for a season.

 



#3 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 04:51 AM

Louise Levene reviews Birmingham Royal Ballet for the Financial Times:

http://www.ft.com/cm...l#axzz34oHKfVkH


 

As a general rule, there is a lot more to reviving a great ballet than merely joining the dots. Frederick Ashton’s plotless works are reduced to pretty patterns if they aren’t cast to the hilt with musical dancers who know how to invest every entrance, every step with emotional significance. A recent matinee performance of Les Rendezvous by the Birmingham Royal Ballet was a case in point: the interplay of the promenading lovers had been immaculately rehearsed but their exchanges were devoid of fragrance or mystery.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 17 June 2014 - 06:23 AM

A review of the Tokyo Ballet by Ilona Landgraf in her blog, "Landgraf on Dance."

The symbol of the rising sun was an overused sledgehammer. One ought to question degrading an culturally important myth to a stage spectacle.

 

The company's commitment and prowess was captivating. Mao Morikawa danced the unswerving and courageous Yoranosuke, Hiroki Umezawa was Lord Enya Hangan, Rie Watanabe was his wife Lady Kaoyo. Morono, the initial troublemaker, was danced by Yoshihiro Harada. Junya Okazaki was Bannai, Morono's liegeman, a murky character in the disguise of a jester.

 

 




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