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Wednesday, June 11


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#1 dirac

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:30 PM

A feature on Avant Chamber Ballet by Danielle Georgiou in The Dallas Observer's blog.

 

 

That desire for clean lines, organization, and immersive performative experiences comes from Puder's time studying under Paul Mejia of the Paul Mejia Ballet International (and previously of the now-defunct Metropolitan Classical Ballet) and Mejia's time studying under George Balanchine. You can always expect a neo-classic clarity and restraint, brisk footwork, and live music (a testament passed down from Balanchine and Mejia) from an Avant Chamber show, and this new season stays true to that mission.

 

For 2014-15, Puder and her company embark on their most ambitious season yet. It's the biggest one to date and is, once again, devoted to live music - an element that dance critics in this city beg for.

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:36 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Robert Gottlieb in The New York Observer.

 

There were other first-rate interpretations scattered about the various Dream casts. Sean Suozzi was a vital, amused and amusing Puck—an original and pleasing performance. Lauren Lovette was a standout Butterfly; Lauren King and Abi Stafford were dramatically convincing as Helena and Hermia; Craig Hall was a droll and sympathetic Bottom. But the truly extraordinary performance was that of Tiler Peck in the ballet’s second-act divertissement, coupled with Tyler Angle in what is perhaps Balanchine’s most subtle and refined pas de deux. Her musicality, her subtlety, her charm, her ease—not even the role’s original interpreter, Violette Verdy, was greater. Peck was dancing at the highest level. But this came as no surprise. She had already enjoyed comparable triumphs in the Patricia McBride role in Who Cares? (“The Man I Love,” “Fascinatin’ Rhythm”) and in Davidsbündlertänze.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:47 PM

A review of the Australian Ballet by Stephanie Glickman in The Herald Sun.

 

Somehow though, despite its pedigree, Chroma is less than the sum of its parts and its potential as an entire program is not fully realised.

 

There’s the Kylian piece for something older (in contemporary dance terms), something newer in McGregor’s post-modern Chroma, and something very new in Baynes’s freshly minted commission Art to Sky. Yet the oldest comes across the best and the just-out Art to Sky seems, even by traditional ballet terms, frustratingly retrograde.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:50 PM

A BBC News interview with Daria Klimentová. Video.
 

Klimentová plays Juliet in several performances alongside her dance partner Vadim Muntagirov.

 

Daria spoke to BBC News about how she feels about permanently hanging up her pointes.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 12:54 PM

An interview with David Bintley by Kris Kosaka in The Japan Times.
 

Japan has provided many ideas for this prolific choreographer whose first work, based on Igor Stravinsky’s “A Soldier’s Tale,” was staged when he was a 16-year-old student at The Royal Ballet School. As he said, “I am the kind of dancemaker who likes ideas and I like to see that in others’ work as well. I like to know a person’s view of the world, not their view of the inside of a ballet studio.

 

Bintley believes that working at the NNTT has improved his choreography as well — especially as “the dancers understand me through movement, since we don’t share a language. That means I really have to choreograph...."

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 13 June 2014 - 05:07 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in "Cinderella" by Robert Greskovic in The Wall Street Journal.

Gifted and handsome principal dancer Cory Stearns, Ms. Seo's intended partner, had to bow out due to injury, so the role of her Prince was turned over to James Whiteside. This workaday principal, a two-dimensional dancer whose sharp facial features and stiff, reddish hair can have a forbidding look, stood in stark contrast to the porcelain-pretty Ms. Seo. He supported her reliably, but danced with often bluff accent, absent of princely grace.

 

As the taller Step-Sister, Roman Zhurbin, ABT's finest dance actor, delivered much of the bossier sibling's material without his usual well-judged restraint, while Craig Salstein, as the more put-upon Step-Sister, ratcheted things up even more.......

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 07:15 AM

A review of Bavarian State Ballet II in "The Triadic Ballet," with extensive historical context, by Ilona Landgraf in her blog, Landgraf on Dance.

 

The revival of Gerhard Bohner's “The Triadic Ballet”, after a quarter century of enforced slumber, has been a much-anticipated event in Munich. The legendary sequence of dances - famous for its strange, unwieldy costumes - was kissed awake by the Bavarian State Ballet's artistic director Ivan Liška and his wife Colleen Scott. Both had belonged to Bohner's faithful first cast from day one. Actually, Bohner's piece was a reconstruction and revision of an original by the German plastic artist Oskar Schlemmer (1888 - 1943). Schlemmer's heirs had thwarted every effort to make his artistic work available to the public. Now, seventy years after Schlemmer's death, the intellectual property rights have expired and this gave Liška leeway to proceed.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 14 June 2014 - 07:22 AM

A review of Pacific Northwest Ballet's "Giselle" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

But the designs add a different problem: They change “Giselle” by setting it in the 19th century instead of the late medieval era. The Act I huntsmen carry rifles; the gamekeeper, Hilarion, rival suitor for Giselle’s hand, is impressive in a frock coat. When Albrecht is caught by the wilis, the spirits of maidens abandoned at the altar, and told to dance to death, he has removed a fur-lined cloak and riding coat; he dances in waistcoat and boots. Though this works remarkably well — the 19th-century features are underplayed rather than made a gimmick — it robs “Giselle” of its mythic quality. This could have been an exemplary staging; instead, it is an offbeat example of director’s theater.

 

 

 




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