Jump to content


Friday, June 6


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,226 posts

Posted 07 June 2014 - 06:13 AM

Jayson Pescasio, a Ballet San Antonio principal, prepares for Jackson.

 

While in Jackson, Pescasio hopes to show his prowess through three rounds of competition, each time with different selections. In addition to the aforementioned variations, he also has learned excerpts from “La Fille Mal Gardée” and Balanchine's “Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux,” as well as a mandatory contemporary piece by Trey McIntyre and an original new work choreographed just for him. For the latter, he reached out to his uncle Ernest Sarino Mandap, a dancer and choreographer working in France, who was happy to oblige. The piece — titled “The Man Who Wants to Talk to the Wind” — is “a very upbeat,” modern dance piece, Pescasio said.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,226 posts

Posted 07 June 2014 - 06:17 AM

A preview of American Ballet Theatre's production of Ashton's "Cinderella" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

During Ashton’s lifetime, the ugly sisters were often the ballet’s highlight. Ashton himself and Robert Helpmann, wonderfully naughty clowns, long gave classic performances of the roles. But this work has been rehearsed with little humor since their deaths, so that at the Royal Ballet in Covent Garden, their roles are often now just camp checklists of stale gags, without connective wit.

 

Never mind: This only serves to better reveal this ballet’s true nature. The greatest strokes of “Cinderella” have nothing to do with comedy. Its heart is in its steps, and they tell a story with layers beyond any in the printed program.

 



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,226 posts

Posted 07 June 2014 - 10:01 PM

A review of the Birmingham Royal Ballet by John Philpott for The Shuttle.

Company favourites Nao Sakuma and Chi Cao are as visually pleasing as ever, guiding the happy promenaders in the manner of pied pipers leading their followers into the unknown.

 

But the sun soon disappears behind the clouds in the shape of Dante Sonata, a piece permeated with a great foreboding, designer Anthony Ward’s steps leading us into a future of fear and uncertainty.

 

 



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,226 posts

Posted 07 June 2014 - 10:04 PM

A review of Boston Ballet by George Jackson for danceviewtimes.

 

Jiri Kylian, Czech too like Zuska but of an older generation and situated in Western Europe, also used a musical mix for his 1995 “Bella Figura”.  Pergolesi, Alessandro Marcello, Vivaldi and Torelli are, arguably, a consonant group but Lukas Foss is part of Kylian’s soundscape as well, and so is silence. “Bella Figura” begins in silence with the dancers warming up and ends in silence. Using more than one  piece of music doesn’t bode well for a work’s unity......... Kylian’s movement melds ballet and anti-ballet steps, athletic and pedestrian action, plus exotica. What is taken from these sources is amply diverse and yet the resulting alloys seem consistently smooth. Nevertheless, the  predominance of crouch, cramp, sag and thrust results in dancing that I find blunt and not “bella”. The cast of nine - who appeared in trios, duos, double duos and ensembles – consisted of Kathleen Breen Combes, Petra Conti, Erica Cornejo, Paul Craig, Altan Dugaraa, Rie Ichikawa, Sabi Varga, Sarah Wroth and Yury Yanowsky: a strong team.

 



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,226 posts

Posted 08 June 2014 - 03:24 PM

A review of Houston Ballet by Molly Glentzer in The Houston Chronicle.

Sara Webb has dazzled audiences for more than 15 years as she's advanced through the ranks of Houston Ballet and matured as a principal dancer. All those years of training, rehearsal and performances seemed to coalesce in her performance of "Swan Lake" at Thursday's opening.

 

 



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,226 posts

Posted 08 June 2014 - 03:25 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Jessica Abejar for Broadway World.

 

The story followed Manon (Julie Kent), who must choose between her one true love Des Grieux (Roberto Bolle) or the rich suitor Monsieur G.M. (Roman Zhurbin), chosen by her brother Lescaut (Daniil Simkin). Ms. Kent captivated the audience the moment she stepped onto the stage, while Mr. Bolle was magnificent. His opening solo was sincere and gentle, turning with such precision and care as the lovesick Des Grieux. Together they possessed incredible chemistry. Their bodies interweaved in spontaneous synchronization, where swift movements of their limbs carved through the space and grandiose displays of affection complemented exquisite dancing. The two were such flirts; even in the tenderness of their most sensual moments, there was a loud sweetness seen throughout.

 

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):