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Thursday, June 5


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#1 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 05:52 PM

Pedro Pupa of the Sarasota Ballet is killed after colliding with a truck while riding his bicycle.

 

Willie G. Burns, 58, of Tampa, was turning right into a service entrance leading to the museum, and didn't see Pupa or the bicycle approaching, a police news release stated. The truck pulled in front of Pupa, who collided with the side of the truck, police reported.

 

 

Related.

Burns, the driver of the delivery truck, has been charged with violation of right away to a bicyclist.

 

At this time, due to the severity of the crash, the crash report is not completed and the investigation is ongoing.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 05:56 PM

A review of Ballet Ireland by Judith Mackrell in The Guardian.

 

Ballet Ireland is a fledgling institution compared with most national companies: 17 years old, modestly resourced, its repertory is dominated by pared-down versions of the classics, created by young, resident choreographer Morgann Runacre-Temple. In creating the company's new, two-act Carmen, Runacre-Temple has made some very intelligent choices within the means at her disposal. She's commissioned guitarist John Walsh to extend her score – the familiar Shchedrin Carmen suite – with live flamenco music, whose percussive spareness cuts through the orchestral lushness of the Shchedrin, to evoke a drier, harsher, more atavistic Spain.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 05:59 PM

An article about the inspiration for Benjamin Britten's "The Prince of the Pagodas" by David Wiegand in The San Francisco Chronicle.

 

His interest piqued by the four-tone melodies of Balinese music, he described how it was performed by the gamelan orchestra in a letter to Roger Duncan: "It's mostly played on metal xylophones (sometimes wooden, bamboo), of all sizes, with gongs of tremendous size, long thin drums, and occasionally a curious one string fiddle, and instruments like our treble recorders. They have bands of 20 to 30, always men, sometimes including quite tiny boys. But although it is quite unlike our music, it is worked out technically and rhythmically, so that one can scarcely follow it. It isn't 'primitive' at all, and neither are the people."

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:00 PM

A profile of Avetik Karapetyan from the Armenian press.

Swimming was his destiny in Armenia. At 8 months, he was already churning water as people watched incredulously. By 5, he was winning competitions throughout Yerevan. Of course, having a father as a champion swimmer in the Soviet Union didn’t hurt matters.

 

Then came boxing and karate, much to dad’s displeasure. Through friends, Karapetyan turned to the world of the arts. He qualified for an artistic school and slowly made his way to auditions. One step led to another

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:03 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Carol Pardo for danceviewtimes.

 

"Theme and Variations" was finally led by Isabella Boylston (in for Gillian Murphy and announced by email that afternoon) and Andrew Veyette, filling in, as Damian Woetzel had done before him, from across the plaza. Veyette’s port de bras was exceptionally courtly and elegant. In the second solo, with the bounding ronds de jamb, most men accent the breadth and reach of the jump; Veyette kept it narrower and tighter, with the height of the jump announcing the dancer’s power. Only once did he seem surprised by tempi slower than they are at home. Boylston, her big confident jump in evidence, was completely at ease with an unexpected partner. Together, she and Veyette made one look more closely at this rep staple and see it anew; cross-company pollination at its best.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 06:15 AM

A review of the Bavarian State Ballet by Ilona Landgraf in her blog, Landgraf on Dance.

 

“Les Biches”, meaning 'young doe' or 'teenager', depicted the luxurious pastime of the young, spoiled upper class of the 1920s. The spacious parlor we were looking at seemed to belong to a villa in the south of  France, a meeting place for the beautiful people in a mood to party. Set and costumes were reproduced after the original designs of Marie Laurencin. Her minimalistic interior – dominated by a light blue settee and a huge pastel painting – suffused with the light of a summer afternoon exuded the carefree lightness of being. This doesn't hide the fact that Nijinska's choreography is rock-solid, a first example of neoclassicism, which has been all too single-mindedly attributed to Balanchine's “Apollon musagète”.

 

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 09:53 PM

The Millepieds arrive in Los Angeles, with baby and bodyguard.

With Benjamin having been announced last year to take over the position of director of the Paris Opera Ballet in the fall of 2014, the pair have relocated to the City of Love with their young son.

 

However, they split their time between France and the States when a movie role calls for it.

 

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 09:59 PM

Reviews of the Birmingham Royal Ballet.

 

The Birmingham Post

The company has brought together three time-honoured ballets by Frederick Ashton under the general heading of “Darkness and Light” and quite frankly the evening was a triumph blending Ashton’s genius with some splendid company dancing.

 

Dante Sonata is a stunning piece reflecting the anguish of Britain in wartime....

 

 

The New York Times

 

The work, given committed performances from the Birmingham dancers, still feels powerful. There are astonishing moments, notably a frenzied solo in which one of the principal women in white (Elisha Willis, excellent), runs wildly, whiplashing her upper body and head and throwing her arms to the sides. The seething groupings, the allegorical resonances feel vividly poetic. What is missing, perhaps, is the deep emotion felt by audiences of that era. Something about the symbolic aspect of “Dante Sonata” makes the ballet feel unmistakably of its time. Nonetheless, it’s still a revelation of a little-known side of Ashton’s work.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 10:02 PM

A roundup of critical reactions to the Royal Ballet's new mixed bill in The Week.

 

The programme features two beloved revivals, says Debra Craine in The Times. It starts with Ashton's The Dream, which looks and sounds a treat, and ends in high spirits with a chance for the Royal Ballet dancers to be silly in the slapstick Concert.

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 04:50 PM

A Danish ballet student makes a splash on Chinese television.

 

Millions of Chinese fans then took to the internet in a bid to find out more about the Struer dancer they dubbed the ‘Danish Angel’.

 

“She’s like an angel. She’s more than ‘beautiful’ – my heart melts just looking at her,” purred one commenter on the Chinese social media site Weibo.

 

 

 




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