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Friday, May 30


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#1 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:24 AM

A dual profile of siblings Lia and Jeffrey Cirio.

 

“I like neoclassical dancing,” Lia replied when asked about her favorite style of dance in an article at the Boston Ballet website. “Give me a Balanchine ballet, and I am a happy girl. But, I know that being a ballet dancer is more than just doing neoclassical dancing. That’s the beauty of Boston Ballet. We get a healthy dose of everything – classical, neo-classical and contemporary.”

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 08:25 AM

Ballet Des Moines' executive director is leaving.

 

During her tenure with the ballet, the company increased its ticket sales by 16 percent and performed for more than 25,000 people at various venues. The company now employs seven resident dancers, one more than the year before.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 10:40 AM

A review of the San Francisco Ballet Student Showcase by Allan Ulrich in The San Francisco Chronicle.

The performers were Natasha Sheehan, Chisako Oga, Norika Matsuyama, Maggie Weirich and Anastasia Kubanda. In the central pas de deux, Ami Yuki displayed a kind of giddy graciousness and fine balances. Christopher Gerty united speed, elevation, superior épaulement and elegant footwork.

 

The premiere of Myles Thatcher's "Spectrum" for 22 dancers easily took the new-works honors Wednesday. Thatcher is the company corps member who is developing an independent career as a choreographer and will next year participate in the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 10:43 AM

A compare/contrast of the Boston and Pennsylvania ballet troupes by Rebecca Ritzel in The Washington Post.

 

In the early 1960s, America’s dance landscape looked far different from today’s. Instead of a professional ballet company, even major cities might have only a pickup troupe attached to an opera company, or a school run by an aging Russian dancer from the Ballets Russes. Then, in 1963, seven cities won the philanthropic lottery and received grant funding to establish a dance company. Boston and Philadelphia were two of those cities, and this week, their ballet companies cap off their 50th-anniversary seasons with visits to the Kennedy Center. The Pennsylvania and Boston ballets have much in common, starting with their ties to the late choreographer George Balanchine. Here’s a side-by-side comparison:

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 10:44 AM

A compare/contrast of Balanchine's and Ashton's versions of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

In both these ballets, the subject matter includes quarrels, magic, love, fairies, humans and a weaver transformed into an ass; but the more you live with both versions, the more differences you see and hear. It’s natural that people choose to prefer one or the other, but I confess that I have changed my mind several times over the years; and many Balanchine devotees watch Ashton’s version with enchantment and awe. Neither contains the Pyramus-Thisbe scene that’s so surefire a part of Shakespeare’s comedy; Balanchine adds such anonymous characters as Titania’s cavalier and the dancers of the Act II divertissement, in each case to superb effect.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 10:54 AM

A radio news story on the 8th annual World Ballet Competition.

 

90.7’s Nicole Creston spoke with Vasile Petrutiu, founder and executive director of both the Central Florida Ballet and the World Ballet Competition.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:17 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Melia Kraus-har for Broadway World.

 

Pianist Cameron Grant accompanied Tiler Peck and Gonzalo Garcia onstage in Robbins' Other Dances. Unrushed, Peck and Garcia's lingering gazes and tender port des bras filled their partnership with both flirtation and melancholy. Robbins deconstructed folk steps in acknowledgement of Chopin's score with flexed feet, skipping, hands on hips, a slap of the floor and tapping of toes. In his solo, Garcia's gargouillade dangled in the air, so natural and free. Together, Garcia and Peck achieved delightful sensuality as he supported Peck in suspended développé turns. Peck's playful sparkle slowly emerged from her winding and unwinding soutenus to the ending lift as her skirt fell over Garcia's head, which she laughingly pulled down even as he stoically continued a blind lift.

 

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:19 PM

A review of Oregon Ballet Theatre in 'Create' by Aaron Spencer for Willamette Week.

 

It’s not the first time the dancers have done something like this; the company holds public rehearsals in its studio all the time. But for this, the company’s Create program, the dancers have a larger stage—and audience. The idea is to show the work of learning a piece, to highlight how dancers must attend to intricacies that an audience might overlook in the final, perfected performance. The creative process also gets a spotlight: Seven dancers show works in progress they’ve set on the company.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:21 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre in 'La Bayadere' by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

Ms. Smirnova comes with all the right ballerina equipment: raven hair, long neck, noble features, eloquent eyes, tapering limbs, skill in both adagio and allegro aspects of technique. She’s the soulful type: She seems at first a throwback to the renowned Olga Spessivtseva, whose career began almost exactly a century before hers. She brings individual inflections to many moments; you don’t take your eyes off her for a second. And yet she doesn’t seem stretched or even fully engaged by her role; she’s holding too much in reserve.

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:22 PM

A preview of Ballet Coeur d'Alene's "Adalia" by Adrian Rogers for The Spokesman-Review.

Brooke Nicholson – the studio’s artistic director and a former dancer for San Francisco’s Smuin Ballet, the New York City Opera, the Boston Ballet and other companies – adapted an “obscure little story” by the Brothers Grimm to write the ballet.

 

The result is “kid-friendly,” Nicholson said, “but not exactly pink sparkles.

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:23 PM

Texas Ballet Theater wraps up its season with "Swan Lake."

 

It’s definitely a risk for Texas Ballet Theater to close its season with such an infamous ballet, but if dress rehearsal on Thursday was any indication audiences are in for a well-balanced performance. The opening party scene in the woods started off a little rocky, but quickly gained momentum. At first, the dancers’ pantomiming felt a bit forced and Principal Dancer Lucas Priolo’s stage entrance lacked energy. But as the scene progressed the dancers began to lose themselves in the movement and story thanks in part to the live accompaniment provided by the Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra—the first time TBT has has live orchestra accompaniment since 2008.

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:26 PM

A review of Robert Moses' Kin by Alice Kaderlan in The Seattle Times.

 

Rounding out the program are excerpts from another Moses ballet, “Nevabeawarldapece” (there will never be world peace), works by two other choreographers — former Kin member Bliss Kohlmeyer and former Alonzo King LINES ballet dancer Gregory Dawson — and the performance of a project that Moses calls “Draft.”

 

Both the Kohlmeyer and Dawson pieces have moments of beauty, but they get lost against the more demanding, polished Moses ballets

 

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#13 dirac

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Posted 01 June 2014 - 05:28 PM

The Sarasota Ballet presents Will Tuckett's "The Secret Garden."

The child-friendly ballet, which includes a narrator and oversized puppets, is set to a commissioned score by Jeremy Holland-Smith. British playwright Alasdair Middleton wrote the libretto and sets and costumes have been designed by Tim Meacock, best known for bringing "Hansel & Gretl" and "Jack and the Beanstalk" to life on stage in England.

 




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