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Monday, May 19


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#1 dirac

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 05:50 PM

A review of  the Gelsey Kirkland Ballet and Ballet Academy East by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

Each dancer wore the same expression throughout. As Aurora, Dawn Gierling seemed be asleep with eyes open in all three acts. India Rose, the Lilac Fairy, looked patiently pious from her first entrance to her last. Katrina Crawford, the Queen, behaved with an unvarying royal sang-froid: a threat to her baby daughter’s life and being awakened from a century’s sleep elicited from her the same superior boredom. What kind of dramatic storytelling was this? I’ve seen younger performers in this ballet with 10 times more acting flair and dance individuality.

 

By comparison, while the dancers of Ballet Academy East are far less mature, you can see at once that this school has clear and elaborate views on ballet style itself......

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 05:52 PM

A review of New York Theatre Ballet by Holly Kerr for Broadway World.

 

Trio Con Brio, set to music by Mikhail Ivanovich Glinka, was a choreographic delight from start to finish. This wonderful dream of a ballet was meticulously re-constructed from a 1952 film from a Jacob's Pillow Dance Festival performance. In the post-performance talk, the story of its two-year painstaking reconstruction was told. Kudos to all involved in bringing this charming hidden diamond to brilliant light. A very interesting facet of the talk was that a small piece of the film had been burned out in of one of the men's solos. This missing link was beautifully restored by Lance Westergard. The men, Steven Melendez and Choong Hoon Lee, gave strong and clean bravura performances. The lyrical, technically sure and lovely Amanda Treiber gave a radiant and beautifully nuanced performance.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 05:53 PM

An interview with Peter Frampton.

You started Hummingbird In A Box after the ballet company first used some of your music. What did they use?

 

“That’s right. Cincy Ballet had asked me to if they could use some of my music from my album Fingerprints along with one track the Now record, a song called Not Forgotten. So it was three instrumentals and one vocal. They had done a pas de deux, a two-person male and female dance duet, as it were, and that’s what they used the music for. I wasn’t able to see it live because I was on the road, but somebody sent me a DVD of the performance, and I was just floored. I was so honored that they’d done this beautiful dance to my music. It was incredible.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 05:55 PM

A review of Milwaukee Ballet by Peggy Sue Dunigan for Broadway World.

 

Serving as Artistic Director for the Milwaukee Ballet the past decade, Pink's visionary plans for this performance art's future comes full circle in his Mirror, Mirror. The profoundly modern ballet intertwined folklore from the original fairy tale based in the Brothers Grimm story instead of Walt Disney's version while contemporary elements in the performance moved Snow White's story into a surreal fantasy.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 05:56 PM

A review of Ballet West by Jane Spence for The Deseret News.

 

The world premiere of "The Sixth Beauty," choreographed by guest artist Matthew Neenan, Philadelphia-based BalletX’s co-founder, portrayed a variety of emotions with dancers sliding on pointe and inverting sur le cou-de-pied. This personal piece about the loss of a child was sorrowful yet joyous. Christiana Bennett and Rex Tilton were perfect conduits of emotion in their technically excellent pas de deux.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 06:18 AM

Judith Mackrell gives a warm welcome to the influx of modern dance choreographers in ballet.

 

The evidence, in the UK, is compelling. We have Wayne McGregor as resident choreographer at the Royal Ballet and Ballet Black commissioning its smartly eclectic repertory from non-classical dance-makers such as Shobana Jeyasingh, Martin Lawrance and Mark Bruce. Productions cast with a mix of classical and contemporary dancers (such as the Pet Shop Boys' The Most Incredible Thing, or Mark Baldwin's upcoming Inala) have become commonplace. At Sadler's Wells, Britain's premiere dance house, the programming makes no overt distinction between the two forms. A dance is a dance is a dance.

 

 




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