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Saturday, May 17


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#1 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:03 PM

A review of Oakland Ballet by Ann Murphy in The San Jose Mercury News.

 

In a high-energy if imperfect night of turf dancing, graffiti decor, jazz, dance theater, funk, postmodern dance and live avant-garde percussion, Oakland Ballet Friday night qualified as "Oaklandesque." Opening a two-day program of that title at the Malonga Casquelord Theater, artistic director Graham Lustig, a British expat, may have grasped a keener sense of the pulse of the complex East Bay city than either of his predecessors.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 04:01 PM

A preview of the Royal New Zealand Ballet's "Coppelia" by Bernadette Rae in The New Zealand Herald.

This time Coppelia graces our stages, with choreography updated by current ballet master - and another Dane - Martin Vedel. Vedel is undaunted by the work's history and fame in his claim that this will be a "unique" production and "adapted to audiences without compromising style, quality and entertainment".

 

The ace up his sleeve, he declares, is Sir Jon Trimmer, who plays Dr Coppelius - a workaholic outsider and genius obsessed with creating artificial life in the form of extraordinary automatons.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 04:05 PM

A review of the Royal Ballet by Luke Jennings in The Guardian.

 

What follows is plotless but enigmatic. The choreography is springy and athletic, and the dancers' gazes shine with the promise of the summer night. Lauren Cuthbertson expresses this optimism with particular brightness. It's easy to think of her as the very English story-dancer that we see in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland or The Winter's Tale, but actually no Royal Ballet principal takes you by surprise quite so consistently. Cuthbertson's never the dancer you expect her to be, and Balanchine's choreography, like that of Jerome Robbins, unleashes a bounding joy that quite transfigures her. And then at moments – as Wayne McGregor tellingly exploits in Infra – she seems to flood with grief. In Serenade, as in many Balanchine ballets, sadness waits in the shadows.

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 04:07 PM

A review of Jessica Lang Dance by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

 

“Scape” took on a Hitchcockian feel as the music grew strained and tick-tocky, with Josefowicz’s violin cutting through like a drizzle of hot oil. The dancers clumped together, gazing about twitchily, like anxious birds. Suddenly one appeared against a side pillar, pinned there by a spotlight. What was his crime? Josefowicz was accusing him of something. Her charging, keening argument grew, and Lang wisely shifted the focus to her alone. The dancers disappeared from view.

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 08:07 PM

A review of Carolina Ballet's "The Sleeping Beauty" by Denise Cerniglia for Triangle Arts & Entertainment. Photos.

 

I went to see Carolina Ballet‘s Sleeping Beauty on opening night Thursday, and I liked it so much I’m going back Saturday. Both the dancers and the orchestra had a few missteps Thursday, a refreshing reminder that these skilled and practiced artists are humans performing live. It was, overall, a remarkable performance of fast and challenging dances, fun characters and awe-inspiring scenes.

 

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 06:09 PM

A preview of St. Louis' Spring to Dance festival.

 

Spring to Dance survived the U.S. financial crisis of 2008, and in recent years some performances have attracted sellout crowds. The fact that the festival is returning for a seventh edition proves that there is indeed a growing audience for dance, said Michael Uthoff, artistic and executive director of Dance St. Louis.

 

 

 




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