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Friday, May 16


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7 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:02 PM

Reviews of the Milwaukee Ballet in "Mirror Mirror."

 

The Journal Sentinel

Telling the story of Snow White, "Mirror Mirror" stays fairly close to the Grimm brothers' version, minus the seven dwarfs and with an added backstory. Good triumphs over evil, as it must in any fairy tale worth its salt.

 

Director-choreographer Pink's take on the story is built around decisive acting, expressive dancing, clear connections between characters and a good deal of captivating theater.

 

 

The Examiner

 

While Gartell undoubtedly steals the show, on can't fail to mention Teague's ideal portrayal of Snow White. She performs the role with all the light, childlike grace one would expect for the character. Snow White's friend Gustav, portrayed by Alexandre Ferreira, is essentially the Prince Charming of this tale. Ferreira is worth remembering in this role as his powerful leaps and turns impressed the audience into mid-performance cheers and applause. This production is ideal for a large ballet company because, even though the story focuses on Snow White and Claudia, there is rarely (if ever) a moment when at least four other dancers aren't dancing alongside them. There are a few busy scenes and many elaborate ensemble pieces.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:08 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Robert Johnson in the Star-Ledger.

 

....Audience members should have been streaming — for the exits — before the start of Alexei Ratmansky’s infantile and nearly endless "Namouna." And many were.

 

Justin Peck is merely the latest wunderkind to whom City Ballet has entrusted its future. His choreographies, including "Everywhere We Go," display a powerful imagination for organizing groups, yet he is not the savior all await — not yet, anyway.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:15 PM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

 

Unfortunately, the ballet into which he was slotted was “Don Quixote,” a poor choice to begin Ballet Theater’s season and a less than ideal vehicle for Mr. Lendorf’s gifts. From his first entrance as Basilio, a barber, the virtues of his Danish training were evident: calm composure and high-definition placement transforming his stocky body into a thing of grace. But with his admirable modesty, he faded into the action of Act I’s gaudy Spanish plaza.

 

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:18 PM

A profile of Sergei Filin by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

“Can’t I do it this way?” asks Bolshoi principal dancer Semyon Chudin in Russian, wondering what could be wrong with his jumps, which were high and sharp. But tense.

 

“You can,” snaps Filin, with a laugh. “But it’s bad.”

 

“Why?”

 

“Because it’s not beautiful.”

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:22 PM

Pictures from New York City Ballet's gala via New York Social Diary.

 

More than 1000 guests attended the gala, and the event raised over $3 million for the Company. Among the highlights of the program were Kristen Bell and  Aaron Lazar performing an excerpt from Rodgers and Hammerstein’s 1945 Broadway musical Carousel (performed at the 1964 inaugural performance by The Music Theater of Lincoln Center, one of the original resident companies of the New York State Theater); George Balanchine’s Allegro Brillante (created in 1956 to music by Tschaikovsky) Igor Stravinsky’s Fanfare for a New Theater (composed in 1964 for the opening of the theater).

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:36 PM

A review of the Royal Ballet by Sam Smith for Londonist.

 

Christopher Wheedon’s DGV: Danse à grande vitesse of 2006, which rounds the evening off, features a 1993 score by Michael Nyman. Although the music is predominantly minimalist in style, it was the complexities contained within it that attracted Wheeldon to its choreographic potential. In the piece the four main couples each have their own style of dancing, while a corps de ballet adopt movements that hint both at mechanisation, and the type of freedom associated with an atom that breaks free from the mass when it possesses sufficient energy. From among the very strong cast, the partnerships of Zenaida Yanowsky and Eric Underwood, and Natalia Osipova and Edward Watson, stand out in particular.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 08:10 PM

Q&A with Kylián répétiteur  Roslyn Anderson.

 

Q: That was a very rich period. So you don't set the newer works?

 

A: No. They're being staged by younger people who were part of their creation, which makes perfect sense. There are several pieces made from 1998 to 2008 - "Indigo Rose," "27'52," "Tar and Feathers," "Gods and Dogs" - that explored a completely different quality. And he's still going. He's exploring film and working with older dancers again, developing the contrast of film and movement or acting. It's a double contrast onstage, amazing.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 08:15 PM

Ballet Coeur d'Alene presents its spring performance.

 

Lessons about truth and life will be danced in contemporary costumes in "Adalia," a world premiere composition inspired by the Brothers Grimm fairy tale "Fairy Tell True" and written for Ballet Coeur d'Alene by Matthew Pierce. Pierce has composed scores for ballet companies throughout the nation, including San Francisco Ballet, Washington Ballet and Houston Ballet.

 

 




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