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Tuesday, May 13


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#1 dirac

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:08 AM

A CNN story on Ingrid Bugge's new book, "The Essence of Ballet."

How do you capture the dramatic movement of ballet in a static image? It's a question which has challenged artists for centuries.

 

Danish photographer Ingrid Bugge uses a mixture of digital technology and Renaissance-inspired painting to bring to life the ethereal world of ballet in her book, "The Essence of Ballet." Now turned into an interactive ibook, readers are given a behind-the-scenes look at how she created the haunting images. 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:11 AM

A report on Julie Diana's farewell performance by Lew Whittington in The Dance Journal.

 

Then Christopher Wheeldon’s After the Rain, made in 2005, was chosen for Diana’s final performance. Many departing dancers pick their best loved roles that are more on the technically easy side, to say farewell, but this part might look simple has to be danced with transcendent presence and indelible partner trust for it to work. Last month she told attendees at the ’Conversations with the Ballet’ series at the City Institute Library that the piece has been emotional for her in rehearsal, in no small part because it is one of Wheeldon’s most intimate duets, past its sexual evocations, the movement has such a soul bearing naturalness. In the performance, if Diana was experiences any nerves, they were not apparent, this was a prima ballerina saying farewell in top form.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:12 AM

Fashion photo gallery from American Ballet Theatre's gala.



#4 dirac

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:19 AM

Ann Wiliams, the founder of Dallas Black Dance Theatre, is retiring.

 

Williams, who started the company 37 years ago, has been a fixture of the Dallas dance scene even before she became Mrs. Williams, the boss. Her love of dance started when she was just a little girl living in Mexia, a town about 90 miles south of Dallas. She likes to joke that she's the second-most-famous person from Mexia, behind Anna Nicole Smith.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:20 AM

An interview with Todd Ivins, the designer of Milwaukee Ballet's "Mirror, Mirror."

 

Mirror, Mirror features a prologue plus two acts, a full-length contemporary fairy tale set to a commissioned original score by Philip Fenney. For Ivins, the scenery "needs to have a sense of this story, while his personal sense of scenery [relates to] is sculptural, immersive....to visually hold the attention of the audience since we live in an attention challenged world." Ivins continues in his desire for scenery, "To drink in this attention for the audience, and then be interactive with the dancers, heighten the sense of theatricality."

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 08:00 AM

American Ballet Theater's gala raises $1.7 million.

 

Photo gallery.



#7 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 08:27 PM

Q&A with Mikhail Baryshnikov.

Q: And, in general, you prefer this arena now?

 

A: Well, as you know, I still do occasional work on a dance stage. But I have always been fascinated by theater and the spoken word, the chance to learn a different language. And the theater has been really kind to me. I'm especially fascinated by theater that does not use any particular language, theater that uses a lot of movement and where my background can really help me. But really, I love going on any stage. I am used to it. It always has been my pleasure, my life.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 05:28 AM

A review of Boston Ballet by Grace Young for MIT's student paper, The Tech.

 

The evening concluded with the North American debut of Alexander Ekman’s Cacti, the “edgiest” ballet of them all. The opening score was text read aloud, followed by a string quartet on stage that was joined by the Boston Ballet Orchestra. Eventually the dancers became instruments of sorts, adding to the score with rhythmic claps, slaps, falls, and breaths. Dancers moved in unison atop square platforms, moving perfectly to the beat that they were both performing to and creating. Spoken word also accompanied them at times.

 

 

 




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