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Monday, May 12


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#1 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:45 PM

San Francisco Ballet says goodbye to Damian Smith and Rubén Martín Cintas. 

Both Smith and Martín Cintas, members of the remarkably strong male wing that Artistic Director Helgi Tomasson has developed here, will be missed terribly and both of them told The Chronicle recently that they were leaving the company roster because of the toll that time takes on even well-primed bodies.

 

Martín Cintas, 37, has been sidelined somewhat in recent years (a serious toe injury), and he notes that "injuries make you introspective. I started exploring; I felt I was ready for a transition." He discovered a facility for teaching and will join the San Francisco Ballet School faculty.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:46 PM

A review of Northern Ballet by Judith Mackrell in The Guardian.

 

As ballet companies become smooshed into an increasingly globalised product, Northern Ballet have remained determinedly true to their identity, dancing their own repertory of full-length story ballets, created by artistic director, David Nixon. But, while this policy has safeguarded the company's USP, it's inevitably put limits around the dancers' range of style and expression. So there's a frisson of liberation in the programme of short, mixed ballets that Northern have opted to dance this season, and especially so in the company's revival of Hans van Manen's masterly Concertante.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:49 PM

Q&A with Hilda Morales.

 

Q. Tudor has always been a subject of controversy. How would you describe him?

 

This is a very deep question, and I hope I do justice to Mr. Tudor. I can only talk from personal experience, having spent so many hours in a dance studio with him. His ballets have their roots in the classical danse d'ecole. He took all those steps and arm movements and changed them. He would take a story and, by studying the emotions that dominated the characters in the story, convey with a subtle or big movement a walk or a run, a turn of the head, or a look that expressed conflict--the human emotion. I loved the way he weaved entrances and exits of the characters by using musical changes in the composition......... You truly had to forget who you were and become the character. As a dancer in his ballets I would practice an arm movement or a walk over and over again until it was that character doing the movement.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:50 PM

The Joyce Theater announces the lineup for its new season.

 

Wheeldon's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland will be performed by the dancers of the National Ballet of Canada at the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. Ballet will also be highlighted throughout The Joyce's season with companies such as Pacific Northwest Ballet, Aspen Santa Fe Ballet, Royal Danish Ballet, and Les Ballets de Trockadero de Monte Carlo — returning for its biannual holiday engagement.

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 05:03 PM

A review of the Paris Opera Ballet by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

 

Against the odds, Mr. Millepied has one too. His “Daphnis et Chloé,” with décor by the French artist Daniel Buren, is that rarest of creatures: a new classical ballet that feels contemporary, not because it imposes a bit of extraneous modernity (some electronic music; a little talking), but because of the sensibilities of its creators. Ravel’s shimmering score, Mr. Buren’s restrained, color-infused geometric forms that hover over the stage, Madjid Hakimi’s poetic, opalescent lighting and Mr. Millepied’s pared-down, fluid choreography, beautifully danced, combine to produce a work that realizes Fokine’s century-old wishes.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:10 AM

An interview with Philip Skaggs of Richmond Ballet.

And that was it. Shortly thereafter, Phil arrived in Richmond to start his career with Richmond Ballet, where he would meet Katie almost instantly. (“I knew he was trouble from the minute I saw him,” she says, and I instantly disbelieve her, because are probably two of the nicest people I have ever met.)

 

Fifteen years later, he’s still going strong–lifting grown humans on, sometimes, very little sleep. During the next two weeks, he’ll be lifting humans in Richmond Ballet’s Studio Three, featuring works by Jessica Lang (Lines Squared) and Ma Cong (Lift the Fallen).

 

 

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#7 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 08:23 PM

Tablet Magazine keeps tabs on Benjamin Millepied.

 

Benjamin Millepied, who as the husband of Natalie Portman and the father of Aleph Portman-Millepied we will dutifully cover on this blog until forever, debuted his newest work for the Paris Opera Ballet this weekend. He won’t be made director of the storied Parisian institution until Nov. 2, and his production of Daphnis et Chloé was in the works long before he was even in the running for the coveted director gig, but this was the perfect opportunity for ballet fans and critics alike to train their eyes on the director-to-be.

 

 

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 08:29 PM

"Man in a Case" comes to Chicago.

 

“Acting requires much the same preparation you must do if you’re dancing,” Baryshnikov said. “There is the rehearsal process, the intense concentration, the long, tiresome hours, the same discipline. When I started doing theater, my English was not as secure as it is now. Speaking was never the problem; the shock was speaking in a language that was not my mother tongue. And that was a bit of a chutzpah.”

 

 

 




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