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Sunday, May 11


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#1 Mme. Hermine

Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 02:00 AM

Alastair Macaulay reviews Pennsylvania Ballet's Director's Choice program:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...ngths.html?_r=0

 

 

The company has a distinguished tradition (plenty of well-staged Balanchines, including its annual “Nutcracker”) going back to its founding director, Barbara Weisberger.

 

In its resident choreographer, Matthew Neenan, it has one of the freshest and most remarkable American ballet choreographers based outside New York. Another American, Trey McIntyre, made a world premiere that was the most remarkable feature of this triple bill. How will the company change under its next director?

 

 



#2 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 02:05 AM

 A review of New York City Ballet by Mary Cargill for danceviewtimes.

 

Anthony Huxley made his debut as the loyal soldier to Megan Fairchild's doll in "The Steadfast Tin Soldier".  Based on a Hans Christian Andersen tale, this is one of Balanchine's few narrative works, and it can, if overplayed, be a bit coy. Fairchild and Huxley, despite their crisp, stylized dancing, were not in the least coy, and I found myself hoping that maybe, just maybe, this time she wouldn't open the window to let the fatal breeze in.  Fairchild danced her opening solo without a smile, but she let her body express her inner humanity, pausing just a bit at the top of her moves to let the music flow, which gave her dancing a quiet, whispered sadness.  Once the soldier presented his heart, she could smile, and her dancing became a bit softer and warmer; it was a perfectly calibrated performance.  Huxley didn't over-emphasize the prancing cuteness of his steps, and matched Fairchild's half-doll/half-human quality.

 

 



#3 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 02:10 AM

Allan Ulrich with a review of Ballet San Jose:

 

http://www.sfgate.co...ing-5469909.php

A translucent revival of George Balanchine's "Serenade" opened José Manuel Carreño's first season as artistic director of Ballet San Jose in February. A stunning performance of Twyla Tharp's incendiary "In the Upper Room" closed the season over the weekend at the Center for the Performing Arts.

 

These two works represent polarities. That the dancers were so adept at exploring those dramatically different approaches to contemporary classicism leaves no doubt: This is now Carreño's company. I don't think these performers could have done such justice to these two masterpieces five years ago. The future has never looked rosier at Ballet San Jose. Silicon Valley should pay attention.

 



#4 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 02:13 AM

Bettina Zilkha reports on the New York City Ballet Spring Gala:

 

http://www.forbes.co...s-3-15-million/

 

Thursday’s New York City Ballet Spring Gala marked fifty years since the company has been performing at the Philip Johnson-designed David H. Koch Theater (formerly the New York State Theater) at Lincoln Center. The evening raised an impressive $3.15 million dollars.

 



#5 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 02:17 AM

Michelle Hache reviews Ballet Austin's Sleeping Beauty:

 

http://www.broadwayw...11#.U3CfG3TD_IU

 

I once heard Tchaikovsky's ballet Sleeping Beauty described as a Fabergé egg; gilded and beautiful on the outside, but hollow on the inside. Because of a lack of plot and character development, this is most certainly the case. The costumes, courtesy of Cincinnati Ballet and designed by Peter Farner, were beautiful, with the exception of the king's overly reactive wig and crowns, which often drew focus during scenes in which fellow dancers had center stage. The Queen's tall Fabergé-like crown, though gorgeous in its design, caused the King's stature to look quite small in comparison. The set was beautiful, despite moments of distraction when house lights malfunctioned, and fog machines were quite audibly loud. Aside from these minor details, the costumes and set truly take focus in this particular ballet, and the piece is lovely.

 



#6 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 02:21 AM

Apollinaire Scherr reviews Justin Peck's new ballet for the Financial Times:

 

http://www.ft.com/in...l#axzz31UliiGor

 

Unlike many young choreographers, Justin Peck does not confuse gloominess with profundity. The 26-year-old’s Everywhere We Go (returning later this month and in autumn) is mainly cheerful and always hopeful. What the ballet lacks in drama – shaped as it is after its appealingly episodic original score by latter-day folkie Sufjan Stevens – it compensates for in its portrait of a generation, Peck’s generation. The 35-minute, nine-part work conveys his people not with story but in the spirit of its steps.

 



#7 Mme. Hermine

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 02:26 AM

A review of Nevada Ballet Theatre's Coppelia:

 

http://www.reviewjou...minist-backbone

Do you speak ballet? Our extensive artistic vocabulary doesn’t quite cover this: What is froufrou ballet-speak for “shtick”?

You can practically hear Harpo’s squeeze-horn —honk! honk!— at moments in “Coppelia,” the breezy comic flan adapted by Nevada Ballet Theatre as its two-show season-ender Friday and Saturday at The Smith Center’s Reynolds Hall.

While its comedic sensibility wasn’t broad enough to qualify as The Three Stooges in tights, Friday’s performance revealed “Coppelia’s” broad appeal, coaxing giggles from the kiddies and a “brava” or two from the grown-ups.

 




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