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2014 White Nights Festival at the Mariinsky


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#136 Mathilde K

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 04:12 AM

Thanks for the info, Mathilde K.! I am glad the Yacobsen Ballet is considered worth attending since I felt that way too!

 

I strongly recommend the DVD Everything Turns into Dancing & Don Juan .

 

It consists of two ballet-films, the first appeared, I think, in 1978 but was filmed probably just after the death of Leonid Jakobson. Its video quality is not even Thirld World. It offers some very interesting choreography (Female variations are fantastic) and frequently spectacular quality of dancing. It presents Jakobson's troupe, Хореографические миниатюры (Choreographic miniatures), soon after the grand mâitre's death and under the new artistic director Askold Makarov.

 

The second film on the DVD is a mini-ballet Don Juan by Sergei Vikulov (recorded not later than 1988), with Sergei Berezhnoi, young Zhanna Ayupova, Veronika Ivanova, Olga Likhovskaya and Yuri Zhukov.



#137 Birdsall

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 05:51 AM

 


 

...Oh yeah, that Chemiakin/Simonov Nutcracker... what the hell?! Were those guys high on drugs when they created that creepy as hell version of the world's most popular ballet?! And I thought Matthew Bourne and Mark Morris's versions were absolutely bonkers... I had to study the former when I studied Dance at school.

 

I have never seen that Nutcracker and was surprised at the youtube videos.  It reminds me of Tim Burton's Nightmare Before Christmas. Is that the only Nutcracker currently performed by the Mariinsky?

 

 

No, the Mariinsky does two Nutcrackers.....one is the Soviet version which is like a traditional version (done in 3 acts and prologue) and the other is the Chemiakin version (done in 2 acts). I think they tend to play the more traditional one much more often. 

 

Chemiakin is actually a fascinating artist. I have seen an exhibition of his artwork which I enjoyed, and there is a modern looking Peter the Great sculpture by him in the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg. 



#138 Birdsall

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 05:55 AM

 

Thanks for the info, Mathilde K.! I am glad the Yacobsen Ballet is considered worth attending since I felt that way too!

 

I strongly recommend the DVD Everything Turns into Dancing & Don Juan .

 

It consists of two ballet-films, the first appeared, I think, in 1978 but was filmed probably just after the death of Leonid Jakobson. Its video quality is not even Thirld World. It offers some very interesting choreography (Female variations are fantastic) and frequently spectacular quality of dancing. It presents Jakobson's troupe, Хореографические миниатюры (Choreographic miniatures), soon after the grand mâitre's death and under the new artistic director Askold Makarov.

 

The second film on the DVD is a mini-ballet Don Juan by Sergei Vikulov (recorded not later than 1988), with Sergei Berezhnoi, young Zhanna Ayupova, Veronika Ivanova, Olga Likhovskaya and Yuri Zhukov.

 

 

Thanks for that tip! I added it to my cart!

 

I did notice that in the Yakobson Ballet's Swan Lake at the Alexandrinsky that Odile's variation was different (and with different music). I wonder if it was Yakobson's choreography or some famous ballerina's version. 



#139 Amy

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Posted 22 July 2014 - 06:04 AM

 

 


 

...Oh yeah, that Chemiakin/Simonov Nutcracker... what the hell?! Were those guys high on drugs when they created that creepy as hell version of the world's most popular ballet?! And I thought Matthew Bourne and Mark Morris's versions were absolutely bonkers... I had to study the former when I studied Dance at school.

 

I have never seen that Nutcracker and was surprised at the youtube videos.  It reminds me of Tim Burton's Nightmare Before Christmas. Is that the only Nutcracker currently performed by the Mariinsky?

 

 

No, the Mariinsky does two Nutcrackers.....one is the Soviet version which is like a traditional version (done in 3 acts and prologue) and the other is the Chemiakin version (done in 2 acts). I think they tend to play the more traditional one much more often. 

 

Chemiakin is actually a fascinating artist. I have seen an exhibition of his artwork which I enjoyed, and there is a modern looking Peter the Great sculpture by him in the Peter and Paul Fortress in St. Petersburg. 

 

Yeah I do have to admit that that artwork by Chemiakin is fascinating, especially for the second act - he certainly captured the whole atmosphere of a land made of sweets.




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