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Friday, May 9


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#1 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:17 PM

New York Theatre Ballet finds new digs.

 

The move itself does not greatly affect the troupe’s performing plans, but it is taking the opportunity to reconfigure its season. The company, which was founded in 1978 by Diana Byer, who is still its artistic director, has performed for several years at Florence Gould Hall (it is presenting performances there this weekend). It will continue to offer its children’s performances at Gould Hall, and will maintain an association with the New York Pops, an orchestra that performs at Carnegie Hall. 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:18 PM

The Harris Theater announces the lineup for its new dance season.

 

Lastly, Scottish Ballet (May 7-9) will perform its 2012 adaptation of Tennessee Williams' “A Streetcar Named Desire.”

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:20 PM

A review of the Sarasota Ballet's Ashton festival by Judith Cruickshank in The Guardian.

 

Nor can they hope to recruit or retain world-class dancers, although the standard in the company is good. But it is fascinating to see how each of the seven ballerinas in Birthday Offering managed to make something memorable of her variation, made to measure as it was for a completely different dancer. Much of the credit for this must go to Barbieri for her meticulous coaching in preparation for the festival, and also to the company's daily class with its emphasis on clean, fast footwork and use of the upper body and arms.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:23 PM

Ballet San Jose's executive director is leaving.

The cuts were made in response to a rise in red ink. The ballet, which formed a partnership with New York's acclaimed American Ballet Theatre in 2012, has suffered some financial setbacks this season. The traditional holiday cash cow, "The Nutcracker," missed ticket goals by an estimated $75,000 and some key donors have dialed back their support of the company.

 

Nevertheless, the ballet dances on. The company is concluding its season this weekend with a production of Roland Petit's "Carmen," which features new artistic director José Manuel Carreño, a former star with American Ballet Theatre, dancing in the role of Don José.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:27 PM

Reviews of New York City Ballet's gala opening.

 

The New York Times

 

New York City Ballet’s spring gala on Thursday at the David H. Koch Theater was, for many reasons, exciting. Above all, it celebrated the company’s 50 years at Lincoln Center. And the evening reached its climax with a sensational world premiere: Justin Peck’s 42-minute new ballet, “Everywhere We Go,” a work both diffuse and brilliant whose rich supply of configurations, phrases and rhythms often (if not always) suggests that young Mr. Peck can do anything he wants with choreography: a virtuoso of the form.

 

 

The Wall Street Journal

 

Footage of that auspicious night played in an onstage video, along with commentary on the theater by architecture critics. And for balletomanes, there was a special treat: City Ballet members who danced in that 1964 season came onstage, including Jacques d'Amboise, Jillana (who goes by one name), Allegra Kent, Conrad Ludlow, Kay Mazzo, Patricia McBride, Arthur Mitchell, Mimi Paul, Suki Schorer, Karin von Aroldingen, Edward Villella and Patricia Wilde.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:29 PM

Nevada Ballet Theatre presents "Coppelia."

James Canfield, NBT’s artistic director — who says he has rechoreographed a lot of the ballet originally created in the 1980s for the Portland-based Oregon Ballet Theatre — describes Delibes’ score as one of the greatest in ballet, “because the timing of the comedy is so important, and the score helps tell the story.”

 

A live orchestra, featuring Las Vegas Philharmonic musicians, will perform that score, heightening its effect.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:30 PM

A preview of Milwaukee Ballet's "Mirror, Mirror" by Elaine Schmidt in the Journal Sentinel.

"All of these old folk tales have an element of morality," Pink explained. "We are adding a backstory and answering why the mirror is magic and why the stepmother is obsessed with it.

 

"I look at the relationship between the stepmother and Snow White, both of whom are just drop-dead gorgeous women," he said. "I'm using my art, which is a beautiful one, to tell this story of the battle of beauty."

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:32 PM

Profiles in brief of dancers from American Ballet Theatre's corps, by Gia Kourlas in The New York Times.

 

Dream roles usually define a dancer, but Skylar Brandt wants none of that: As much as she hopes to dance Juliet one day, she also has her eye on the sassy, flamboyant Kitri in “Don Quixote.” Ms. Brandt, who surprised herself by progressing far in the casting calls for the forthcoming Starz show “Flesh and Bone,” is a sparkling actress as well as a dancer; her performances in Alexei Ratmansky’s “Piano Concerto #1” are imbued with as much mystery as daring, boundless joy......

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:34 PM

Reviews of San Francisco Ballet by Rita Felciano for danceviewtimes.

 

Program Seven

 

Liam Scarlett, artist-in-residence with the Royal Ballet, is the latest of these choreographers that seem to come from nowhere, and all of a sudden are in such demand that you worry about them burning out too quickly. Judging from "Hummingbird," Scarlett's commission for SFB -- something like his 20th work at the age of 27 -- there is a lot of potential in this still young choreographer. His musicality has yet to be determined. Throughout, walking patterns easily coexist with ballet steps. The lifts are prominent and athletic, very much in the current style. Fresh was Scarlett's uncommonly fluid and promising approach to his handling the relationship between corps and soloists.  He set the piece on three primary and two subsidiary couples and only eight corps members whom he divides and subdivides  -- sometimes in the shadows, sometimes stepping to the forefront; they comment on the soloists but also swallow them up. Yet with such a relatively small number of dancers -- sixteen -- Scarlett manages to fill the large Opera House stage with airy and spacious choreography.

 

 

Program Eight

 

Even in less than stellar performances, "Agon" is a feast. What struck me this time  was this ballet's wit and playfulness; the more I see it, the less I see the much-vaunted abstraction. At the end of the Part I, with a hand to their heart, the dancers looked like athletes listening to the pre-game national anthem. It reminded me of Stravinsky having offered the nation a new orchestration of the National Anthem, an act for which he got arrested. For all the rigor of "Agon's" canons, mirror images, syncopations and six o'clock extensions, it sports a light spirit almost jumping at you with jaunty walks, swinging arms, heel-toe-heel feet and broken wrists. And let's not forget those slight, recurring bows. In the Bransle Simple Jaime Garcia Castilla and Hansuke Yamamoto, embodied that kind of courtly game playing particularly well.  

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:39 PM

A fashion pages story on New York City Ballet's gala.

 

Given this, you would have expected the NYCB’s spring gala celebrating its 50-year anniversary in its current Philip Johnson-designed building and sponsored by Vacheron Constantin to pull out all the Hollywood stops. But while the carpet was long, its populace was less star-studded. The biggest names were Alicia Keys, Kristen Bell (who performed a rendition of “If I Loved You” from “Carousel”) and a lonely-looking Sean Avery. This was also not a bad thing.

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:53 PM

Gillian Lynne releases a fitness video.

 

She said: “I hate these tapes for fitness because they’re always with girls with this hanging out and that hanging out shouting ‘one, two, three four’. That’s just not a way to get an oldie going.”

 

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:54 PM

Sadler's Wells will bring back "Push."

It premiered at Sadler’s Wells in 2005 and has previously run at the London Coliseum, in 2008. It stars former Royal Ballet principal guest artist Guillem and choreographer Maliphant.

 

At Sadler’s Wells, the previously announced Torobak, choreographed and performed by Akram Khan and Israel Galvan, will receive its UK premiere from November 3 to 8.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:56 PM

Q&A with Ryan Jolicouer-Nye and Logan Pachiarz, who dance the stepsister's in Kansas City Ballet's Cinderella.

What are the most striking differences for you in playing the role of a woman – steps or mannerisms?

 

Ryan: "There comes a point in the second act when Logan and I have to flirt with the men in the court. It's funny because sometimes I forget what role I'm playing and will automatically start flirting with one of the ladies."

 

Logan: "The mannerisms have been the most difficult for me to perfect. Sometimes when I am in the moment of performing in a certain section, I find myself doing over-the-top impressions of what I 'think' is the appropriate response to another characters actions. More often than not, I crack myself up at my choices."

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:07 AM

An interview with Julie Diana.

A similar trajectory could be found in the resumés of many other ballet stars. What sets Diana apart is her absolute commitment to the emotional core of every part she dances. As she says, "I love to tell a story onstage and lose myself in the role."

 

She honed this skill in San Francisco, where she worked with the great British ballerina Lynn Seymour. This "gifted actress," she recalls, "taught me how to communicate with my hands, first."

 




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