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Thursday, May 8


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#1 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 04:42 PM

A preview of Tallahassee Ballet's "Sleeping Beauty" by Mark Hinson for The Tallahassee Democrat.

Guest dancer Aaron Ingley is stepping into the role of Angelina Jolie, er, sorry, Maleficent for the Tallahassee Ballet's turn on the fairy tale.

 

"Yes, I will be in full drag in front of my friends and family and fiancee," Ingley, 36, said and laughed on Wednesday night during a dress rehearsal. "There is a tradition of men playing this role, so me doing it in drag is nothing new. It's a great role, though. I play it as big and evil as possible with a lot of scorn and envy."

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 04:48 PM

Jared Matthews and Yuriko Kajiya will join Houston Ballet as first soloists.

 

Mr. Matthews and Ms. Kajiya first worked with Mr. Welch in 2001 when he was choreographing The Long and Winding Road for ABT Studio Company, casting them as one of the main couples in the ballet. When they joined ABT’s professional company, Mr. Welch cast each of them in their first soloist roles in his ballets Clear, Carmina Burana, and Within You Without You: A Tribute to George Harrison. Mr. Matthews was featured in one of the casts of Mr. Welch’s work Clear when ABT premiered it in 2001. Since 2001, he has also danced in the first cast of Clear several times when it has been performed on tour and when it was revived most recently at the Koch Theater in New York City in 2013. They were both featured in the ballet that Mr. Welch created for ABT’s Within You Without You: A Tribute to George Harrison.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 04:49 PM

Grand Rapids Ballet Company presents "A Midsummer Night's Dream."  Video.

The story takes place in the mind of a young Nick Bottom, a little boy over whom the royal fairy couple quarrels, who dreams of becoming an adult and running for the highest office in the land.

 

"He's a little bit of a misfit. He loves to read, he loves to dream, and one of his dreams is he wants to become president," said Wevers, artistic director of Whim W'Him and a former principal dancer with Pacific Northwest Ballet. "It's an inner child's dream of what it is like to run a campaign."

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 04:51 PM

A preview of the new season at Sadler's Wells by Judith Mackrell in The Guardian.

 

See the Music, Hear the Dance is a mixed bill celebrating the richly inventive danceableness of Thomas Ades's music. The four works being danced to Ades include two revivals – Karole Armitage's Life Story performed by members of her own company accompanied by British soprano Claire Booth and Ades himself on piano; and Wayne McGregor's Outlier, a ballet originally choreographed for New York City Ballet and now remounted for the Royal Ballet Flanders. But there are also new works from two of the most interesting talents now associated with the Wells, Crystal Pite, recently appointed to the theatre's roster of associate artists, and new wave artist Alexander Whitley.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 05:04 PM

A review of Agnès Letestu's farewell to the Paris Opera Ballet by Patricia Boccadoro for Culturekiosque.

 

There was Stéphane Bullion, his arms full of flowers, her partner in The Lady of the Camelias, both in the filmed version and on this momentous occasion, the dancer who gave her his heart in the ballet, and who was only too aware that he had lost his greatest and most beautiful partner. José Martinez, officially "retired" a few years before was there, almost hidden by an immense bouquet of white roses, the dancer with whom she had formed that rarity in dance, a true partnership. They embraced amid the resounding cries of the crowds. Ghislaine Thesmar, her coach, and French choreographer, Pierre Lacotte, whose works she has danced to perfection, were also bought on stage to share in the tribute.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 05:11 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Michael Popkin for danceviewtimes.

 

One can give JR the benefit of the doubt with respect to the work’s intentions, but not Martins who implied in an interview before the piece that it was intended solely to bring the elusive “young” audience into the house.  JR’s hyper enlarged images of disaffected Parisian youth, hanging on the housing projects during the 1995 riots (and why weren’t those images used here?), like his close ups of Palestinians and Israelis in another of his celebrated photo projects, celebrated the individuality and human beauty of his subjects in opposition to the collective animosity of social groups and the dehumanizing cycle of a politics of oppression and vendetta.  But in the hands of Martins and company it was just cynical marketing.  The project (like his appliqué life size photos of the company dancers for last winter’s season) offered JR New York celebrity, but only of the shallowest kind; and in this case on a stage named for David H. Koch.

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 06:22 PM

A review of the Cincinnati Ballet by Siobhan Burke in The New York Times.

 

 

The incongruity between his music and Mr. Hougland’s choreography turned out to be more than slight. Or maybe congruity was the problem: movement slotted too directly into the leaden rhythms and riffs of songs like “Heart to My Chest” and “Shadow of My Mind.” Either way, the pairing didn’t work, with uncomplicated, strike-a-pose steps falling flat amid hackneyed lyrics (“I’m not holding back anymore” or “When it feels right, it feels right”). The costumes — black sequined bras and low-waisted black tutus for the four women, white jeans for the four shirtless men — only reinforced the uncomfortable sense of being thrust back into the 1990s.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:58 PM

A review of Sylvie Guillem in '6000 Miles Away' by Hanna Weibye in The Arts Desk.

 

Forsythe’s Rearray, the next piece, is more of the same: an intense, stony-faced duet against a black backcloth between dancers in clothes so ordinary they barely count as costumes. This time it’s Guillem and Massimo Murru who have a relationship to work out, expressed through Forsythe’s incredibly cerebral dissection of classical ballet tradition. The problem is that tradition is so rarefied that only a handful of people in the world are equipped to fully appreciate its intelligent deconstruction. Rearray filled me with admiration for Forsythe’s intellect, and Guillem’s (who commissioned the piece for herself, originally with Nicholas Le Riche as partner, pictured below left), and for the intense connection between the two dancers performing such demanding material, but I was also exhausted. 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:58 PM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Paul Parish in The Bay Area Reporter.

 

Hummingbird, the highlight of Program 7 (plays again Thursday and Saturday), pulled the audience to their feet for the sincerest standing ovation I've seen in a long time. People kept rising to their feet as if they'd been lifted by the same internal forces that had held the dancers so high off the floor. Liam Scarlett, the Royal Ballet-based choreographer, has set a visionary fantasy to Philip Glass' Piano Concerto (2000), a shimmering, melancholy score with a tremendous theatrical sweep to it, with shifting emotional weather that keeps you floating on ambiguous harmonic progressions that never resolve. It's perfect for Scarlett's dark scene of creatures that seem to be floating in a modern ether where everyone's sensitive, moody, brimming with life and profoundly alone.

 

 

 




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