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Tuesday, May 6


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#1 dirac

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 04:57 PM

Damian Smith paints with his feet.

The project, which will yield six action drawings in different media - from liquid pencil on cotton paper to acrylic on canvas - is the brainchild of Muriel Maffre, herself a former principal with the Ballet and now executive director of the Museum of Performance + Design. The drawings will be exhibited in June at the Catharine Clark Gallery and auctioned to benefit MP+D on July 19.

 

Maffre "thought of those chicken scratches as something that is very familiar to everyone who dances," says Smith, 40, whose graphic arts experience is limited to this project. "Every stage, every studio, every space at a barre has these marks on the floor. We thought that seeing as it's my last season, it would be a great way to document the dancing that is still in the moment and in movement."

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 04:59 PM

The young troupe Ballet in Cleveland sells wine for fundraising purposes.

Ballet in Cleveland has struck a unique fundraising venture to raise both awareness and funds for the two-year-old organization: It is selling wine.

 

While the group was founded in March 2012, the idea of a marriage between wine and ballet actually was born 10 years ago. That's when founding director Jessica Wallis took a trip to California's wine country.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 05:00 PM

A preview of Aspen Santa Fe Ballet by Robert Johnson in The Star-Ledger.

 

Alejandro Cerrudo, the third dance maker on the program, has a fondness for elaborate stage settings. Yet Aspen Santa Fe Ballet is a company that travels light, so Mossbrucker says he took Cerrudo aside and talked him out of plans to use a ramp, a platform and hanging scenery. “Finally he became inspired by the idea of just having a completely empty space to work in,” Mossbrucker says. The result is “Last,” a piece that emphasizes pure dancing. Here the bustle of a “wild and crazy” middle section evaporates, ending the dance with a lilting duet that opens up the space. Citing this choreographer’s knack for inventing memorable visual images, Mossbrucker describes the piece as defying contemporary clichés and “very accessible to the audience.”

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 05:01 PM

Princeton Ballet School prepares its annual performance of "The Sleeping Beauty."

At the American Repertory Ballet and its official school, the Princeton Ballet School, in Princeton, students and performers of all ages, abilities, and aspirations dance under the same roof, to the same steps, and to the same live piano music each day.

 

Director Mary Pat Robertson not only heads the school, but teaches young children, who may hope one day to be a full-time trainee, or even a member of the ARB’s professional company. Robertson, who has been with the school for 34 years, likes focusing on teaching individual skills to the young dancers, rather than giving them everything at once.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 06 May 2014 - 05:03 PM

Ballet East Dance Company of Austin reaches out to poor children.

 

Right now Ballet East has 10 adults in their company. Their Ballet East 2 teaches dancers 12 and up and also offer free after school ballet folklorico at Martin Junior High School.  Since they are a non-profit they run off grants, donors and sponsors. “My hope is to open it up to younger students. I would love to see kids in East Austin taking ballet, and taking tap, or jazz and getting exposed to that world at a much younger age than the ages we are impacting now,” says Villarreal.  

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 11:26 AM

A preview of the Lyon Opera Ballet by Pia Catton in The Wall Street Journal.
 

To his surprise, Lyon's artistic director, Yorgos Loukos, said yes, giving Mr. Lemon an amount of time with the dancers that is rare and, he said, "luxurious," for a choreographer. "I went and made a work that I could not have made" in the U.S., he said.

 

By issuing such open invitations, the Lyon Opera Ballet has gradually built one of the most diverse repertories among ballet companies today. It has worked with more American choreographers—including Trisha Brown, Bill T. Jones, Sarah Michelson and Stephen Petronio —than many U.S. dance companies. Mr. Loukos estimates the company has performed the work of about two U.S. choreographers every year for the last 20 years.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 11:42 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Rita Felciano for danceviewtimes.

 

 Even in less than stellar performances, "Agon" is a feast. What struck me this time  was this ballet's wit and playfulness; the more I see it, the less I see the much-vaunted abstraction. At the end of the Part I, with a hand to their heart, the dancers looked like athletes listening to the pre-game national anthem. It reminded me of Stravinsky having offered the nation a new orchestration of the National Anthem, an act for which he got arrested. For all the rigor of "Agon's" canons, mirror images, syncopations and six o'clock extensions, it sports a light spirit almost jumping at you with jaunty walks, swinging arms, heel-toe-heel feet and broken wrists. And let's not forget those slight, recurring bows. In the Bransle Simple Jaime Garcia Castilla and Hansuke Yamamoto, embodied that kind of courtly game playing particularly well. 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 11:42 AM

A review of the closing of Sarasota Ballet's Ashton festival by Judith Cruickshank for danceviewtimes.

 

 It provided a wonderful setting for the three talks; by the dance historian David Vaughan, author of the definitive book on Ashton's ballets; by Jane Pritchard curator of the Dance collection at the Victoria and Albert museum and finally a fascinating dialogue between Webb and Sir Peter Wright, a long-time colleague of Ashton's and formerly Webb's boss at Sadler's Wells Royal Ballet. All three talks were well attended and enthusiastically received, as were the three afternoon film shows.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 04:54 PM

The young Murley Dance Company launches a tour of the U.K.

 

The biggest challenges of setting up classical company are clearly financial. It takes a lot of money and thankfully, Murley is lucky enough to known people in the industry who he has been able to beg, borrow and steal from in his investment process. With no Arts Council England or public funding he is now lucky enough to be able to employ and pay ten dancers, have an assistant, costume designers, tech team, lighting design and wardrobe mistress – all through private funding from contacts made in a professional career.

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 05:00 PM

Q&A with Mark Morris.

Who are your modern dance influences?

 

George Frederic Handel and George Balanchine.

 

Who or what inspires you today?

 

Music, my dancers, literature and travel.

 




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