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dirac

Monday, May 5

8 posts in this topic

A glimpse into the soul of Michael Pink, courtesy of Dave Begel for OnMilwaukee.com.

Pink is a tall man – taller than most dancers – and he has a face that would be comfortable on a president or a history professor or a fifth face on Mount Rushmore. He carries a pleasant air about him, but with his chiseled features, there is no mistaking that he is in full charge of this creation. Sure, there is plenty of help from Nadia Thompson, the Ballet Mistress, and Denis Malinkine, the Ballet Master.

But this is Pink's show.

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Tatyana Samoilova, the star of "The Cranes Are Flying," is dead at age 80.

Born on May 4, 1934, in Leningrad, she studied ballet seriously and was invited to train at the Bolshoi Theatre but turned the chance down to become an actress.

In 1990, Samoilova was invited as a guest of honour to Cannes and received a lengthy standing ovation, but her latter years were reportedly marked by loneliness and il health.

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Australian dancer Stephanie Goldhahn dances with the Imperial Rusian Ballet Company.

It was here that fate stepped in as she stood at the ballet barre behind Russian dancer, and now boyfriend, Daniil Kolmin.

“Danill was previously in The Imperial Russian Ballet and when he was asked if he wanted to join Imperial (as the title character) for the Australian tour by contract, he suggested I send my DVD and resume to them to see if they’d like me too,” Goldhahn said.

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Two Royal Ballet dancers get spliced.

Two of Britain's top ballet dancers who got engaged on stage have married 20 years after they met as winners of a childhood competition.

Leanne and Peter Kay, first set eyes on each other as primary school pupils, when they were joint winners of a children's dance competition.

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A review of Concert Dansé by Hanna Weibye for The Arts Desk.

But more is owed to a requiem than merely echoing its musical structure in movement: more even than other mass texts, a requiem addresses God with heart-rending immediacy, pleading for peace both for the departed and for us, who mourn them. Kenneth MacMillan’s setting of ballet to Fauré’s Requiem, after his friend John Cranko’s untimely death in 1973, is almost unbearably poignant precisely because it is imbued with the rawness of real loss. And whatever his own feelings about God, there is a clear sense in Duruflé’s Requiem of the peace, redemption and transcendence to be found through the liturgy of the Mass for the Dead.

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A look at the post-ballet lives of several British ballerinas by Rupert Christiansen in The Daily Telegraph.

The first was the auburn-haired Moira Shearer, who died in 2006. In 1948, at the zenith of her career with the Sadler’s Wells Ballet at Covent Garden, she was cast as the heroine of Powell and Pressburger’s smash-hit movie The Red Shoes – a film of lavish Mediterranean glamour and romance which captivated a generation otherwise sunk in post-war austerity and created an aura around ballet which inspired untold thousands of little girls to sign up for ballet classes and dream the dream. Shearer was not a one-hit wonder: she went on to appear in several other major films and theatrical productions..... as well as marrying the author and broadcaster Ludovic Kennedy, with whom she had four children. Older readers of the Daily Telegraph will also remember a further and more surprising string to her bow, when later in life she became an astute and accomplished book reviewer.

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A review of the Sarasota Ballet by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

All three ballets in Wednesday’s opening program — “Birthday Offering,” “Illuminations” (1956) and “Facade” — were repeated at the festival; each (especially “Illuminations”) won increasing admiration on a second viewing. “Birthday Offering” and “Facade” were danced by second casts that were at least as good as the first ones (an amazing feat for a small ballet company). And though Ashton choreography has the amplitude to command New York’s Metropolitan Opera House, the intimacy of the Sarasota Opera House (seating 1,115) led the audience easily into the details of these ballets.

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A review of the annual Command Performance La Fête du Ballet by Margaret Putnam for TheaterJones.

What made Lyric Suite—set to several works of Edvard Greig and featuring American Ballet Theatre star Julie Kent and Clifton Brown from Jessica Lang Dance—so arresting was its complex interplay, where the two often go their separate ways only to reunite in one triumphant scene as he carries her aloft out of sight.

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