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Saturday, May 3


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#1 dirac

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 11:19 AM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Allan Ulrich in The San Francisco Chronicle.

 

A close reading of the ballet might find meaning in the different character of the four principal couples' duets. The knowledgeable Francia Russell, who staged "Brahms-Schoenberg Quartet" here, has attempted to highlight those contrasts. In the opening Allegro, Mathilde Froustey's elegant technique and insouciant manner strike sparks in her partnership with Carlos Quenedit, all within a ballroom setting. The Intermezzo brings us Vitor Luiz, who seemed bewitched by Maria Kochetkova's rapturous attack.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 11:21 AM

A review of Sarasota Ballet by Carrie Seidman in the Herald-Tribune.

 

As a finale, you couldn't do better than "Sinfonietta," which Ashton created in 1967 and which the company debuted just four months ago. The opening and closing movements of Sir Malcolm Williamson's score — a staccato toccata and a spirited tarantella respectively — are a bouncy aerobic workout capably handled by two couples in the first (Kate Honea with Alex Harrison and Nicole Padilla with Juan Gil) and an ensemble led by Ricardo Rhodes in the last.

 

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 11:24 AM

Related story by Seidman.

 

Currently, no company in the world besides the Sarasota Ballet has an active repertoire that includes so much of Ashton's work (13 ballets, including two full-length works, plus divertissements). In making it an integral part of his troupe's repertoire, Webb, whose extensive connections in the British dance world have eased access to the ballet's rights, has earned the company international attention, as well as two invitations to dance at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. over the past two years.

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 11:36 AM

A review of WayneMcGregor/Random Dance by George Jackson for danceviewtimes.

 

All the dancers deserve to be mentioned: Catarina Carvalho, Travis Clausen-Knight, Alvaro Dule, Michael-John Harper, Louis McMiller, Daniela Neugebauer, Anna Novak, James Pett, Fukiko Takase, Jessica Wright. Admirable was their clarity for long durations, their subtlety as actors. McGregor’s choreography raises several questions. To arrange movement sequences, does he use the same chance procedures i.e., random methods as Merce Cunningham? If so, why do Cunningham’s look more inventive? Why is Jorma Elo’s busyness more annoying than McGregor’s? What role has choice and what role has automatic procedure in making art? Who is to blame for the automatic procedure fad – Arnold Schoenberg and his tone rows? By the way, “FAR” is an acronym for “Flesh in the Age of Reason”.     

 

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 11:38 AM

A review of the Sarasota Ballet by Judith Cruickshank for danceviewtimes.

 

"Monotones" is a ballet which always seems new however many times I see it. There is a wonderful rightness about it, as one sometimes finds with great music; inevitable but not predictable. Lovingly danced by the Sarasota cast, the audience received it with cheers - though I was surprised to hear applause (admittedly deserved) part way through the first section.

 

 




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