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dirac

Friday, May 2

9 posts in this topic

A NY Times item picking up the story of Roy Kaiser's stepping down as the artistic director of Pennsylvania Ballet.

Perhaps 35 years feels like enough. Roy Kaiser, who joined the corps de ballet of the Pennsylvania Ballet in 1979 and rose through its ranks to principal before eventually becoming artistic director of the company in 1995, has announced that he is stepping down.

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A feature on ballet companies' attraction to Shakespeare by Michael Crabb in The Toronto Star.

Chatham, Ont.-born Nixon is a Shakespeare veteran. He danced in many adaptations and in his subsequent choreographic career has made versions of three of the plays.

As a company director, he cites compelling pragmatic reasons for adapting Shakespeare. “They have title recognition. Audiences often come already knowing the story. And when you’re dealing with Shakespeare there’s this immediate association with quality, with something really good.”

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A review of the Sarasota Ballet by Anna Dearing for YourObserver.com.

Night two of the Sir Frederick Ashton Festival was even better than the first. The dancers seemed even more confident after their successful opening evening, offering a hint of the nights to come. Although, the lack of the live music from the Sarasota Orchestra did make you wish for Saturday night’s performance when their accompaniment will be back.

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A review of Nashville Ballet by Amy Stumpfl in The Tennessean.

The second piece features Nashville Ballet's debut of "Petite Mort," a fascinating study in movement from Czech/Dutch choreographer Jirí Kylián. Balancing classical lines with unexpected contemporary twists, the choreography includes six men and six women in a brisk collection of interlocking pairings and ensembles.

The piece also features some rather nontraditional dance partners, including fencing foils and black baroque gowns set on moving dress forms. It's a clever contrast, especially when set to Mozart's lyrical "Piano Concertos" (played to perfection by Nathan Fifield and the Nashville Symphony)......

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A review of New York City Ballet by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

In two ballets, the musicians are integrated into the piece itself. Richard Tanner’s 1982 “Sonatas and Interludes” has its pianist (Elaine Chelton) onstage, as a couple (Sara Mearns and Amar Ramasar) perform a spare pas de deux of almost mathematical precision, set to five sections of Cage’s 1944-46 writings for prepared piano. The sonorities (plinking, chiming, ticking, jangly) are wonderfully unexpected, more playful than Mr. Tanner’s rather sternly compelling duet, to which both Ms. Mearns and Mr. Ramasar bring a focused clarity and subtlety of phrasing that are a joy to behold.

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A review of the Stuttgart Ballet by Ilona Landgraf in her blog, "Landgraf on Dance."

Compared to the fast-paced, edgy and sen­sa­tio­na­lis­tic no­vel­ties, the cen­tral piece, Béjart's “Songs of a Way­farer” proved to be a re­sto­ra­tive con­trast. Ori­gi­nally created in 1971 for Rudolf Nureyev and Paolo Borto­luzzi, it was also per­for­med else­where. Marcia Haydée, Stutt­gart Ballet's ar­tis­tic di­rec­tor from 1976-1996, managed to obtain it for Stutt­gart's Ricky (Richard Cragun) and Egon (Madsen) in 1976. It was a long­stan­ding suc­cess in Stutt­gart. For artistic director Reid Anderson, who had also danced as 'Wayfarer' back then, the piece's revival after almost twenty years has been very important.

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A review of the Sarasota Ballet by Judith Cruickshank for danceviewtimes.

The Sarasota company is no exception to that rule but they have attractive dancers, beautifully and lovingly coached. Ashton would have been thrilled by the neat footwork shown by the majority and certainly by the way in which the seven cavaliers threw themselves with relish into the mazurka section he devised for them. Among the women I liked Kate Hornea in the variation created for Nadia Nerina and Sareen Tchekmedyian in the dance made for the tall, slender Beryl Grey -- surprising because Tchekmedyian is not tall and, though slim, is rounded.

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A review of New York City Ballet by Siobhan Burke in The New York Times.

How is it that the women in Mr. Peck’s work seem autonomous, even when lifted and supported by their male peers? The opposite was true of Mr. Preljocaj’s gloomy “La Stravaganza,” a ponderous if passionately danced encounter between two tribes. The female dancers often recall rag dolls or mechanical toys, for little discernible reason.

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A review of Mikhail Baryshnikov in "Man in a Case" by Donna Perlmutter in LA Observed.

But "Case's" depiction bore all the signs of unresolved trial and error -- despite the big-name team he surrounded himself with, one that gladly produced this pastiche for the still-luminous luminary. (After all, would there be a draw with a lesser name?)

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