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Thursday, May 1


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#1 dirac

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 09:18 AM

Fort Wayne Ballet hosts a Beer and BarreBQ.

Playing off the barre aspect of dance, organizers decided to incorporate that into the name of the event because the barre represents an important part of the dance process and is a way that dancers learn technique and positioning. Fort Wayne Ballet dance programs serve more than 400 students.

 

While folks guzzle down the local ale and lick barbecue sauce off their fingertips, dancers will weave in and out of the crowd showing off both contemporary and classical routines.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 09:55 AM

A National Public Radio item on Maggie Shipstead's "Astonish Me."

 

While garnering terrific reviews, Northshire Bookstore in Saratoga will host an interview and book signing with Shipstead. She will be interviewed by Darlene Myers, the Artistic Director and Choreographer of Northeast Ballet and Myers Dance Center.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 09:57 AM

Dancers from New York City Ballet will perform with the Philadelphia Orchestra at the Saratoga Performing Arts Center.

 

With Bouder in the leading role of Odette/Odile and Villarini-Velez as Prince Siegfried, the dancers will perform Swan Lake’s famous pas de deux and solos. Choreography for the program will be excerpted from Peter Martins’ full-length production of “Swan Lake.”

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 10:16 AM

A preview of the Tel Aviv Dance Festival.

In addition, 12 evenings featuring the works of independent choreographers will take place in the intimate Yerushalmi Theater. All these performances combine dance with live music.

 

The foreign guests include Company Maguy Marin from France, whose performance May B will take place tonight and tomorrow night; Granhoj Dans from Denmark; France’s Ballet Preljocaj; and Campania de Danza Miguel Angel Berna.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 10:17 AM

City Ballet of San Diego presents Mozart's "Requiem."

 

The choir accompanying the performances is the same one assembled last year for “Carmina Burana.” After the shows last spring, choral director Jim Tomkins-MacLaine moved the choir under the auspices of the San Diego Public Library. Nettles hopes to use the group for many more collaborations with City Ballet.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 11:24 AM

Q&A with Justin Peck and Sufjan Stevens.

At what point did you begin to talk about working together on a new score?

 

PECK I wanted to see how “Rabbit” went, and the process of working with Sufjan was very hands-on and engaging, so I brought it up with him. I think he thought about it for a while.

 

STEVENS I was a bit resistant to this new project because I’m not used to working in a big organization like this. I think I was also nervous — I didn’t know if I had any ideas. It turns out I had too many. Justin, was there any opposition to your working with someone who wasn’t really a composer?

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 11:32 AM

A review of the Joffrey Ballet's "Romeo and Juliet" by Laura Molzahn in The Chicago Tribune.

 

And it's got the archival photos and footage to prove it. Those images, projected on stage, raise the stakes of Pastor's 2008 production, now receiving its U.S. premiere from the Joffrey Ballet, through May 11 at the Auditorium Theatre. While Pastor's streamlined choreography and Sergei Prokofiev's lushly dramatic 1935 score, vigorously played by the Chicago Philharmonic, deliver the story with brilliant clarity, the modern setting makes it matter.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 11:34 AM

A review of Sarasota Ballet by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

Ashton in Sarasota? Englishness in Florida? The Sarasota Ballet is directed by Iain Webb and his wife, Margaret Barbieri, former Royal Ballet dancers who recall Ashton with a fond devotion they communicate to their audience. In consequence, enthusiasm was already high before Wednesday’s opening performance. And it kept rising during the evening’s three ballets, as they showed a broad span of Ashton’s exceptional versatility. Quintessential Ashton virtues — charm, wit, humanity, affection, love of dance itself — soon flooded the theater.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 05:09 PM

Obituaries for Gailene Stock.

 

The Australian

 

Born in Ballarat, Stock became a member of the AB for its inaugural season in 1962-63 before a scholarship took her to London and study at the Royal Ballet School. She later rejoined the Australian company, where she became principal artist, and also worked at the National Ballet of Canada and Royal Winnipeg Ballet.

 

After 16 years as a dancer, she started to nurture the talents of others. She became director of Melbourne’s National Theatre Ballet School, then spent nine years at the helm of the Australian Ballet School.

 

 

The Sydney Morning Herald

Australian-born, she was the director of the Royal Ballet School in London for the past 15 years. She took leave after being diagnosed with a brain tumour a year ago and an acting director was appointed.

 

In illness, as in her early life, she was brave. When eight she contracted polio, spent 18 months in hospital in an iron frame and was told she would never walk again. She resumed training as a dancer at 12 and joined the Australian Ballet at 16.

 

 

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:25 PM

Q&A with Gretchen Smith of New York City Ballet.

 

Can you elaborate about what was so hard about it?

For the first three months, it felt very much like it was still the summer course. We were all used to taking ballet classes every day, but suddenly now we were taking ballet classes in the middle of the day. You have a mental switch that not only was, this will be my passion at one point, but this is the passion now. You used to spend eight hours a day at school wherever you came from; now you’re spending half of that time. So it’s not just ballet class or just school; it’s going to school, coming back for ballet class, going to school, coming back for ballet class, and if you missed your classes one day it’s your responsibility to make up the work. You’re learning those responsibilities without your parents’ oversight. That was the hardest part: carving out your life at 15. 

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:57 PM

An appreciation of Alison Roper by Martha Ullman West for Oregon ArtsWatch. Thanks to sandik for the link!

 

Roper’s unlikely career as a Balanchine ballerina (few in this century who are not trained at the School of American Ballet achieve this) began under the artistic directorship of Canfield, when she danced the fourth movement “Russian” solo in Mr. B’s Serenade.  Under Stowell she has danced the temper tantrum on point that is the Choleric variation in Four Temperaments, and lent her fleet-footed skills to his Divertimento 15. Most recently she applied her eloquent body to what is said to be the role of Stravinsky’s wife in Stravinsky Violin Concerto.

 

 




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