Jump to content


This site uses cookies. By using this site, you agree to accept cookies, unless you've opted out. (US government web page with instructions to opt out: http://www.usa.gov/optout-instructions.shtml)

Saturday, April 19


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:28 AM

A story on London Children's Ballet by Sally Williams in The Telegraph.

 

London Children’s Ballet was founded as a charity in 1994 by Lucille Briance, 61 (she remains artistic director), the mother of a ballet-mad daughter who desperately wanted to be a ballerina but did not have the ‘right’ feet or knees. ‘Her knees hurt now and they hurt then,’ Briance says of Zoe, then 10. ‘She wouldn’t have had the slightest chance of getting into the Royal Ballet School.’ Briance looked for an outlet for Zoe’s passion that would allow her to dance more seriously but carry on at school. There was no such place, so Briance created it......

 

 



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:30 AM

A story on young Australian dancer Harrison Lee b y Joel Meares in The Sydney Morning Herald.

The next day he won the junior grand prix prize, singling him out as the best overall junior male or female dancer. He received scholarship offers to join the American Ballet Theatre school in New York and the Royal Ballet School in London - he could be living in either city as soon as September - and emails are still rolling in inviting him to more schools.

 

Backstage during competitions, he ignored the antics of other dancers. ''It's very fierce,'' he said. ''There are a lot of mind games that go on backstage. People put each other off by showing off in front of them to scare them. I usually just stick my headphones in and block everyone else out.''

 

 

 



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:32 AM

A review of the new documentary "Ballet 422" by John DeFore for The Hollywood Reporter.

 

Viewers should not expect to hear Peck expound on his theories or inspirations. Nobody here asks, and he doesn't offer. When he speaks, it's generally to tweak something mostly invented offscreen: figuring out in rehearsals that his soloist needs more time getting from point A to point B; fretting that the lighting design is too dark; reassuring costume designers that they shouldn't worry too much about using heavy fabrics because "we're used to uncomfortable costumes." The other professionals Peck works with are often more animated onscreen than he is.

 

 



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:34 AM

Two new troupes try to re-establish ballet in Charleston after the demise of Charleston Ballet Theatre.

 

The Charleston Ballet Theatre was active for 25 years, proving that classical dance had an audience in town and could be supported over the long term. The two new companies in formation each claim originality and are located in different parts of the metropolitan area. Whether they can muster sufficient financial and operational support, and attract the necessary dancers, remains an open question.

 

 



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:35 AM

A review of Oklahoma City Ballet in "Beauty and the Beast" by Kathleen Redwine in The Oklahoman.

 

Despite significant difficulties Thursday night with lighting and set cues, and a few rough spots with the orchestra, all of which should be fixed by the actual performances, the ballet’s real strength was in its choreography and dancing.

 

 



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:37 AM

A review of the Eifman Ballet by Luke Jennings in The Observer.

 

Eifman is an efficient nuts-and-bolts man. His choreography is physically fluent, and he knows how to use space dynamically. But Rodin also demonstrates all the failings of his creative style. The full-evening piece presents us with Eifman's reading of the troubled relationship between the sculptor Auguste Rodin (Dmitry Fisher) and his much younger lover Camille Claudel (Aigerim Beketayeva), also a sculptor of note, who was committed to an asylum for the last 30 years of her life.

 

 

 



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:39 AM

An interview with Joshua Grant. Video clip.

 

In “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Grant is dancing George Balanchine’s classical ballet choreography. At Seattle Dance Project, the movement doesn’t make the same physical demands. “Seattle Dance Project is aimed at creating movement that looks good but doesn’t require the physical feats of an 18-year-old,” he said. “At the same time, you’re working with different dancers, moving outside of your comfort zone, and I appreciate that.”

 

 

 

 



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:41 AM

A preview of Miami City Ballet's 2014-15 season.

 

The upcoming season features four company premieres, including a new work choreographed for the dancers by Justin Peck. He’s the 26-year-old choreographer and New York City Ballet dancer whose pas de deux Chutes and Ladders was performed this season.

 

 



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 20 April 2014 - 02:46 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Ashley McKean for danceviewtimes.

 

Radetsky’s and Abrera’s Espada and Mercedes turned up the heat a few notches with a performance that sizzled with personality. Husband and wife in real life, the couple has a natural connection and trust onstage. Although shorter in stature than Gomes, Radetsky danced the role of the lead toreador with commanding expansiveness and handled his cape with panache. Abrera was a technically secure and seductive street dancer; her Mercedes made me wish I could see her try her hand at Kitri. Other standouts were Misty Copeland and the young Skylar Brandt (replacing Luciana Paris) as the Flower Girls at Kitri’s wedding. These two had a lot of dancing to do, including difficult solos during the wedding pas de deux, seemingly designed to give the principle couple a chance to breathe. Brandt, in particular, danced with delightful joy and a precocious technique. Hers seems to be an especially bright future.

 

 



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 22 April 2014 - 05:05 AM

A review of Maggie Shipstead's "Astonish Me" by Louise Flynn in The Boston Globe.

 

Despite having practiced battements at the barre since she was four years old, Joan’s glory years are brief — she notes that dancer’s careers are accelerated “like dog years” — and not very glorious. She dances in the corps for a celebrated and imperious Russian choreographer, Mr. K, who bestows on his favorite young dancers gifts of perfume, an act of influence more than generosity. Though never good enough to earn the honor of Mr. K creating a ballet for her, she does garner his respect by driving the getaway car for a famous Soviet dancer, Arslan Rusakov, when he defects to the United States.

 



#11 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 22 April 2014 - 05:07 AM

Mikhail Baryshnikov brings "Man in a Case" to Southern California.

 

"As different as they are, there's something fundamentally shared by those two characters. To me they stand in precise contradiction to Chekhov's primary dictum, which is 'live now,'" says Paul Lazar, who adapted and directs, with Annie-B Parson, under the auspices of their company, Big Dance Theater.

 

"Man in a Case" began its journey to the stage when Baryshnikov, commissioned by Hartford Stage, approached Parson and Lazar about collaborating on a solo dance piece. The conversation quickly moved to Chekhov.

 

 



#12 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,455 posts

Posted 17 May 2014 - 03:55 PM

A review of Oregon Ballet Theatre by Martha Ullman West for Oregon ArtsWatch. Thanks to sandik for sending in the link!

Mostly polished, partly sophisticated, and slickly crafted, Oregon Ballet Theatre’s Celebrate program, which opened at the Newmark Theatre on Thursday night, could have used more depth. Because there is huge depth and intelligence, musicality, wit and dramatic power in the dancing of Alison Roper, whose 18 years of performing with the company is the reason for the celebration. Roper’s final appearance on stage takes place at the end of this run, next Saturday night.

 

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):