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Wednesday, April 16


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#1 dirac

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:40 AM

Reviews of the Eifman Ballet.

 

The Arts Desk

In the Soviet era, when he suffered much official opprobrium, Eifman’s work was labelled pornographic. After seeing Rodin, a 2011 narrative work about the sculptor’s stormy relationship with Camille Claudel which had its first British outing at the Coliseum last night, I find myself in complete agreement. There's nothing wrong with scantily clad dancers and depictions of sex per se, but Rodin garnishes them with all the demerits of modern, plastic “industry” porn: the flimsiest plot, no emotional depth at all, and stereotypes instead of characters.

 

 

 

The Independent

 

As Rodin, the tireless Oleg Gabyshev partners Lyubov Andreyeva’s touching Camille in a succession of gymnastic duets. As Rodin’s other lover, Yulia Manjeles watches from the sidelines in seething jealousy. The recorded music is a grab-bag of Ravel, Saint-Saëns and Massenet.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:45 AM

Trey McIntyre's troupe goes on its farewell tour.

 

As it turns out, the decision to disband the company was completely by choice. McIntyre simply wants to take his work in a different direction, and explore technologies and performance formats that aren't conducive to a traditional dance company structure. "If that were the direction I wanted to continue as an artist, [audience engagement] would continue to evolve and grow deeper. The crossroads with the Boise community was one of, 'OK, we've been her for a while,' and it was the seven-year itch in terms of the audience's relationship with us. How do we bridge that, and grow that even deeper? The company will continue; it's just not my dance company."

 

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:48 AM

An interview with Jessica Brown Findlay.

“Having done ballet for such a long time I think I’m used to exerting myself,” she says. “In ballet, if you’re knackered, people are like, ‘Come on! Why are you stopping?’

 

“It makes me laugh when actors say, ‘Oh I’m so tired.’ I kind of think, ‘Well, firstly the crew have been here much longer than you and secondly, you were probably able to leave earlier.’ Acting is nothing compared to the physical exhaustion I used to know in ballet.”

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:54 AM

An obituary for polio sufferer Barbara H. Clark.

 

Once the acute stage of the polio had passed, she started hanging around the local dance studios, helping the younger students and secretly resumed taking lessons again, paying for them with her babysitting money. When her mother found out, she agreed with Barbara that they were helping with her recovery and allowed her to continue. Barbara went on to study at the Hilltop School of Theater and Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, and the American School of Ballet in New York.

 

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:56 AM

A review of "Tanaquil LeClercq: Afternoon of a Faun" by BSimon for Shockya.

 

A documentary on one of the more enchanting and tragic figures of the world of ballet, “Afternoon of a Faun: Tanaquil le Clercq” affirms the talent of its subject, but frustratingly fails to establish enough of a cleanly delineated backdrop or emotional throughline to connect to a general audience. The frustrating result is a hopelessly insular work.

 

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:57 AM

The Cairo Opera Ballet Company presents "Don Quixote."

 

The additionally trimmed Don Quixote is not a completely unusual procedure, as some companies do it to simplify the plot so as to reshape dramatic developments and create different dramaturgical equilibriums between two pairs: Don Quixote and his squire Sancho Panza on the one hand and lovers Kitri and Basilio on the other. The Cairo Opera Ballet Company's extremely compact, 90-minute version provides snapshots of the original Don Quixote. This sketchy thematic line points to Don Quixote's search of his Dulcinea only to lead towards his realisation that Kitri is not the one since she is in love with Basil. Don Quixote leaves to pursue his quest...

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:26 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by Sarah Halzack in The Washington Post.

 

Julie Kent was a font of regal beauty as fairy queen Titania. In her climactic pas de deux with Marcelo Gomes in the role of the fairy king Oberon, Kent plunged into splits and spilled back into deep arches with all the stateliness of a queen, but sans any of the aloofness. She also was remarkably convincing when Titania is under a spell that makes her lust after a shabby mortal in a donkey costume. It’s a section that must be tempting to overact because it’s so silly, but Kent’s playful, doe-eyed energy was that of someone genuinely entranced by her cartoonish suitor.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:28 AM

Washington Ballet dance moves analyzed by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post. Video.

 

Maki Onuki’s split leap can be a real kick in the head — literally. It’s a ballerina’s version of a cheerleader’s C-jump, which is fine for a bright, lively ballet like “Don Quixote,” where that jump is expected. Explosive skills don’t belong in every ballet, though; a heavy push for power can take away from grace, which depends on natural, relaxed ease. As any dancer can tell you, the art is all in achieving the right balance.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:32 AM

Reviews of the Eifman Ballet.

 

The Guardian

 

His use of cliche can be crude to the point of offensive: in the opening scene we know Claudel is mad because her face is blank and twitchy and she's surrounded by a lolling, shuffling chorus of bedlamites. In the fraught duets between Claudel and Rodin the headlines scream passion but don't distinguish between sexual or artistic emotion.

 

 

The Financial Times

 

The leading performers emote with inexorable vivacity and roaring improbability – Rodin as neurotic rugby forward; the ever-dishevelled Camille as contortionist with serious personal problems; another mistress as disaffected hooker.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:44 AM

Sarah Jessica Parker interviews Gelsey Kirkland. et al., while sitting in for Leonard Lopate.

 

World-famous ballet dancer Gelsey Kirkland and her husband, Michael Chernov, talk about the history of classical ballet and about launching the Gelsey Kirkland Conservatory of Classical Ballet. Ashley Bouder and Sara Mearns tell us what it’s like to be principal dancers with the New York City Ballet. Anthony Marra discusses his debut novel, A Constellation of Vital Phenomena. And Glenn Lowry, director of the Museum of Modern Art, describes what goes into MoMA’s major shows and talks about the future of museums.

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 07:59 AM

A review of American Ballet Theatre by George Jackson for danceviewtimes.

 

The next ballet followed after only a pause. “Aftereffect” has an all male cast and likely the intent was to balance the preponderance of women in the Fokine (there are 19) with Gomes’s 8 bare chested men. The choreographer tries to show his cast – on this occasion Thomas Forster, Roman Zhurbin, Blaine Hoven, Calvin Royal, Arron Scott, Sean Stewart, Jose Sebastian, Zhiyao Zhang – both as an ensemble and, briefly, as individuals. The result is compromise. Step follows step, often for bravura’s sake but without a cohesive sense of style. Puzzling actions punctuate the proceedings, such as one dancer suddenly waving. Is he signaling someone in the audience, or waving at another dancer, or doing it to show he is a friendly guy? Conclusive is only that “Les Sylphides” remains unmatched.

 

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 09:49 AM

A review of Ballet NY by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

 

 

The virtues of “Kinderszenen,” a work for three couples, brought out the strengths and weaknesses of Ballet NY’s roster. The variety of steps exhibited solid if not scintillating technique, especially among the men. But the piece also exposed some roughness in the dancers’ rhythm and, more jarringly, an inconsistency of stage presence. At Ailey Citigroup, the short distance between performers and audience exacerbated the problem.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 09:56 AM

A preview of New York City Ballet's spring gala.

 

An onstage tribute to City Ballet dancers who performed in the 1964 season is expected to feature several who performed at the theater’s opening, including Jacques d’Amboise, Suki Schorer, Kay Mazzo, Karin von Aroldingen and Sara Leland.

 




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