Jump to content


Friday, April 11


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:26 PM

Reviews of the Royal Ballet in "The Winter's Tale."

 

The Telegraph

 

Christopher Wheeldon’s new three-act version of Shakespeare’s The Winter’s Tale is a triumph. It is contemporary and classical, traditional and modern, narrative and abstract. It feels like something entirely new.

 

 

 The New York Times

This scene, which starts as if time itself had been suspended, but reaches a climax in which every millisecond is a matter of urgent excitement, is the centerpiece of this three-act dance adaptation of Shakespeare’s five-act romance; the Royal Ballet gave the world premiere on Thursday night at Covent Garden. The choreographer Christopher Wheeldon, the composer Joby Talbot and the designer Bob Crowley have joined in making Bohemia new, and as you watch and listen, your breathing changes.

 

 

The Independent

 

A brisk prologue introduces the kings Leontes of Sicilia and Polixenes of Bohemia, Leontes’ marriage to Hermione and the birth of their son Mamilius. It’s clear, streamlined storytelling, but the breakneck pace leaves these characters too anonymous, with rhubarbing gestures for friendship and love. Talbot’s music and Bob Crowley’s stylised, no-period costumes are efficient rather than evocative.

 

 



#2 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:29 PM

More.

 

The Guardian

 

After the chill white marble of the Sicilian court and the angry claustrophobia of its music, the transition to the light- and colour-filled world of Bohemia is exhilarating. On a stage dominated by one magically illuminated, decorated tree, this act is pure dance, a seamless fusion of the folksy and the poetic, in which Sarah Lamb and Steven McRae are adorable pastoral lovers, and Valentino Zucchetti is the wittiest of shepherds.

 

 

The Arts Desk

 

The surprise let-down in the Bohemian idyll (aside from the excellently angry interruption of Federico Bonelli’s disguised Polixenes) is Talbot’s music: though sufficiently fantastical, the shimmering soundworld he creates seems too spare for the dancing. I'd have liked to hear more of the sweeping lyricism deployed at Hermione’s trial: his more usual painting in sound just won’t stick in the brain (one snatch of Massenet recalled by a pas de deux lift from Manon has driven all Talbot’s score out of mine).

 

 

The Stage

 

It’s a contentiously contented Act III, Mamilius and Antigonus are tidily swept under a rug and 16 years of suffering is thrust aside to joyously forgive Leontes his bad behaviour. But Wheeldon didn’t write in the happy ever after - he’s just working with what he was given and he creates a suitably dramatic moment when Hermione becomes “stone no more”. It’s a fitting ending for the play’s message of redemption, and that out of death comes life.

 

 



#3 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:31 PM

And more.

 

The Evening Standard

 

At the centre is Edward Watson as Leontes, the paranoid king who decides his wife and best friend are having an affair. This is the toughest part to pull off, since key plot points happen only in his head, and it’s not entirely convincing. His creeping madness is played out in scrabbling hands, stretched mouth and twitchy limbs and it’s all a little bit Childcatcher.

 



#4 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:34 PM

A review of Brooklyn Ballet by Gia Kourlas in The New York Times.

 

I saw the dance with the vocalist Shelley Hirsch accompanying. It was hardly a natural match: The dancers, whose skill level fluctuates wildly, showed strain and uncertainty in their doodling improvisations. As the piece wore on, Ms. Hirsch’s gurgling, squawking vocal effects — especially after she began singing “As Time Goes By” — started to sound like David Sedaris impersonating Billie Holiday. “Quilt/One Night Stand,” both cluttered and hollow, is little more than a fussy experiment.

 



#5 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:35 PM

An opinion piece by Chan Hon Goh in The Vancouver Sun.

 

The missing component for the majority of young dancers today is the lack of consideration to the meaning behind the steps. What are you saying with that movement? As impressive as it is to accomplish remarkable feats of technical brilliance, to be an artist, one needs to transcend to a higher level and touch our emotions.

 



#6 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:36 PM

A clip from Justin Peck's new ballet.

 

Now they’ve put together a new piece, Everywhere We Go, which premieres May 8 at City Ballet, and it's an even more ambitious task for Stevens: a nine-movement orchestral score. For a sneak peek at both the dance and music, Lipes directed this short film, featuring principal dancers Tiler Peck, Teresa Reichlen, and Amar Ramasar.

 



#7 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:37 PM

A promotional video from Cincinnati Ballet.

 

The two-minute video, created by staffers Adam L. Lawrence and Leyla Shokoohe, features company dancers Abigail Morwood and Patric Palkens dancing, in street clothes, in more than a dozen locations throughout Over-the-Rhine, home of the company's studios.

 



#8 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:40 PM

A preview of Dance Salad Festival 2014 by Molly Glentzer in The Houston Chronicle.

 

Figuring out how to translate long works into "curations" may always be a challenge, but in some ways Henderek's job has gotten easier since she founded her festival 22 years ago in Belgium and moved it to Houston 19 years ago. That's a full generation as dance careers go; many dancers Henderek has championed have transitioned to new jobs as choreographers and directors of companies. In the small world of international dance, that's quite a boon.

 



#9 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:06 AM

An NPR story on Sergei Filin. Audio and text.

 

Through a translator, Filin says he's also learning an entirely new way to live. "Before the attack, I was the one who was leading everyone — my family, my friends, people who needed help, and this was my life role at that time," he says. "But following the attack, the situation has reversed, and now these people do everything to allow me to overcome this terrible experience and to go forward in my life."

 

 



#10 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:29 AM

Marcelo Gomes shows The New York Times around his (brand-) new flat.

Part of the apartment’s appeal, aside, of course, from the dishwasher and the doorman, is its utter spanking newness. “It did feel good to be the very first to turn the key of a place,” Mr. Gomes said. “You bring in your own energy. It’s not the energy of the people who were living here before.”

 

“There is a little jeté in my step,” he continued. “I am very proud of how much I’ve worked to get here. Everyone knows that buying in New York is not easy.”

 




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):