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Wednesday, April 9


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9 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 04:30 PM

A review of English National Ballet's "My First Ballet: Coppelia" by Louise Levene.

 

The Telegraph

 

Sadly, the entire delightful enterprise has been derailed, yet again, by the insistence on an on-stage narrator, in the shape of batty old toymaker Dr Coppelius (a thankless task for ENB junior soloist Daniel Kraus). I can understand the need for a little spoon-feeding – Swanilda sitting downstage tying her shoe ribbons and introducing the main characters would be helpful. But having a protagonist in this very straightforward story capering about stating the obvious (Where’s my key? My front door! It’s open!) is an insult to the intelligence of even the doziest three-year-old.

 

 

A preview of the production.

 

Dancers will wear the sumptuous costumes from the company's full production and the production is directed by English National Ballet's Associate Artist George William. George is a young British choreographer and graduate of English National Ballet School.

 

 

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 04:31 PM

A preview of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre's "Don Quixote."

Three pairs of dancers in the company also will be making their debuts in the roles of Kitri and Basilio, the fugitive lovers whose story dominates the ballet.

 

“What's amazing is that, of the six people who are doing leads, none of them have done it before,” Orr says. “I have all newbies.”

 

 

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 04:33 PM

An update on Cincinnati Ballet's forthcoming visit to New York.

Two of the company's leading male dancers are likely to miss the New York performances, the company's first time there in nearly 35 years.

 

Soloist Romel Frometa injured his knee during the final performance of "Boléro" on March 29. It won't require surgery, but he won't be able to perform until the company opens its 2014-2015 season in September.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 04:34 PM

A review of Maggie Shipstead's "Astonish Me" by Leah Greenblatt for Entertainment Weekly.

 

In the end, Astonish Me is less about plot than the simple pleasure of reading such a naturally gifted novelist. Nearly every sentence here lands with a bull's-eye thwock of emotional truth, and the inner lives of her characters feel as real and immediate as the shifting settings they inhabit: still-gritty mid-1970s Manhattan, shabbily elegant Paris, the sunbaked suburban sprawl of Southern California. 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 04:36 PM

A feature on Peter Boal by Marcie Silliman for National Public Radio.

During his first season, Boal was singled out by the company's co-artistic director and choreographer Jerome Robbins for a solo in "Goldberg Variations."

 

“[Robbins] would find the new talent, particularly males, and he would bring it out," Boal says. The young man quickly moved up through the ranks.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 09 April 2014 - 04:41 PM

A review of San Francisco Ballet by Rita Felciano for danceviewtimes.

 

Over the years Tomasson has extended his neo-classical approach with what might be called non-conventional lifts in the pas de deux. It's there that he often lets his imagination soar in sculptural encounters of considerable invention as if to show off every facet of his ballerinas. In the first movement the corps of twelve shadowed Maria Kotchekova and Davit Karapetian fairly conventionally until Karapetyan all of a sudden started to travel her low on the floor only to swing her around in circles and have her land sitting on this thigh. It was charming, and it was capricious.

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 04:54 PM

Lise la Cour is profiled by Crystal Chow in The San Jose Mercury News.

Two days later, la Cour landed in the heart of Silicon Valley... only to discover no there there.

 

"I was shocked that there was absolutely no downtown," she says. "Compared to Copenhagen, which goes on forever with shops, restaurants, hotels, everything--here I only saw homeless people. And all the shops were closed, too."

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:23 AM

A review of the English National Ballet by Judith Cruickshank for danceviewtimes.

 

Does the programme do justice to the subject​?  For me, the answer has to be no.  Four of my close relatives served in the First World War. All had different experiences and different memories and none of them were as simplistic as the generalised emoting I saw at The Barbican.  Curiously, in its previous incarnation English National Ballet had in its repertory one of the greatest ballets on this subject ever made, AntonyTudor's “Echoing of Trumpets”.  By taking one small incident Tudor told us everything we need to know about the waste, cruelty and futility of war. A lesson for this latest generation of choreographers and one that repays study.

 

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:25 AM

A preview of USC's 'Ballet Stars of New York..'

 

“It’s a unique experience for college students to be able to dance alongside these stars and perform with a live orchestra,” [Stacey] Calvert says. “It’s a fun, glamorous event.” Friday night’s stellar cast includes Megan Fairchild, Tyler Angle, Anthony Huxley, Gonzalo Garcia — and, last but not least, superstar Mearns


#10 dirac

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:32 AM

A review of Maggie Shipstead's "Astonish Me" by Nolan Feeney in TIME.

 

Astonish Me, out this week, sets itself up to be about the choice between dangerous, unstable passion and easy, reliable contentment, but the story is never quite that simple. That’s partly because Shipstead isn’t interested in the straightforward answers. In Seating Arrangements, she expertly explored the emotional grey areas of a New England family weathering intergenerational turmoil and infidelity, and in Astonish Me, she once again succeeds at capturing the messy, intimate drama of domesticity: furtive glances exchanged over dinner tables, after-hours pillow talk, the different breeds of jealousy that lurk among friends, lovers, rivals and spouses.

 

 

 

Q&A with Shipstead.

EE: Given all of the fabulously dramatic true stories that have, well, pirouetted from within the world of ballet - Suzanne Farrell's Holding Onto the Air, Balanchine's Dancing Cowboy, and most recently Jenifer Ringer's Dancing Through It and Misty Copeland's Life in Motion - was there one story from the history of ballet memoir and biography you found particularly inspiring?

 

MS: Mikhail Baryshnikov's defection in Toronto in 1974 most directly inspired the course of events in Astonish Me......

 




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