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Saturday, April 5


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#1 dirac

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 05:23 AM

A review of the Sarasota Ballet by Carrie Seidman in The Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

 

But the night belonged to the 27-year-old. Whether taking bows in yellow tights as half of the lead couple in Sir Frederick Ashton's "Birthday Offering" or walking on stage in a tux to accept the wild applause after his own "Symphony of Sorrows," the night belonged to Ricardo Graziano, a principal since 2010 and an emerging choreographer extraordinaire.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 05:24 AM

The Courier-Journal of Louisville notes in brief the announced departure of Wendy Whelan from New York City Ballet.

 

We offer Ms. Whelan best wishes and thanks for her artistry of more than three decades.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 05:26 AM

Ballet San Antonio closes its season with a free performance.

 

It was not always clear who was who as the ballet’s protagonist lovers, Kitri and Basilio, were portrayed by three different couples. Clad in a red ruffled dress with a flower in her dark hair, Crystal Serrano seemed to be the audience’s favorite as the confident Gypsy-like Kitri whose bouncy verve and big smile brought extra vitality to the scenes with her in the center. She was often partnered by Husan Hopuy.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 05:29 AM

Gillian Lynne talks about choreography and a dancer's life.

I usually start with the music. It all differs though. With a ballet it can be all about the subject and the music comes afterwards. Or sometimes you hear a piece of music, fall in love with it and it becomes a ballet.

 

With a musical, you've got to listen to the score, which has usually already been written by the time the creative team comes on board. You've got to really understand the words and the music and what it is trying to say.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 05:34 AM

Nicola Fonte stages a new "Rite of Spring" for Ballet West.

 

"I didn’t want to make a piece depicting a Russian pagan ritual," Fonte said. "I don’t know if there’s anything comparable in contemporary culture to a maiden dancing herself to death to celebrate the renewal of spring. But it is really hard to strip something so emotional and powerful of its narrative content."

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 02:28 PM

A review of Louisville Ballet by Elizabeth Kramer in the Courier-Journal.

 

On Friday, during the opening performance of “Complementary Voices,” the house had an electrified sensation. The evening first introduced choreographer Ma Cong, a Chinese native, to the company’s audience with his piece “Tethered Pulse.” Following was Hougland’s “Fragile Stasis” which the company took the stage for the first time since its 2007 world premiere here. The program concluded with the company serving up a world premiere with “Spaghetti Western” by longtime company collaborator choreographer Val Caniparoli. In each, the company excelled in accomplishing the very different styles offered by each of the choreographers’ works.

 

 

 



#7 Alexandra

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 07:52 PM

My review of the New York City Ballet's triple bill danced this week at the Kennedy Center on danceviewtimes:

 

Fantasy Worlds

 

 Dreams and fantasy have long been a part of ballet, but the triple bill the New York City Ballet presented Wednesday night showed fantasy with a contemporary twist. All three works (“Soirée Musicale,” an early work by Christopher Wheeldon; “Year of the Rabbit”, the second ballet by new wunderkind Justin Peck; and “Namouna, a Grand Divertissement”
 by Alexei Ratmansky) were as fresh and unpredictable as spring.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:41 AM

A story on the adaptation of "The Winter's Tale" for ballet purposes by Alice Legnado for Voice of Russia.
 

Dance is also a way to show what Shakespeare was saying without getting caught up in the tricky language.

 

“That language can often be difficult to understand if you’re not used to it,” says Watson, “especially in The Winter’s Tale, the language is very difficult. So to show what people are talking about, rather than having to listen and understand, is actually a very clear way of storytelling...."

 




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