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dirac

Wednesday, April 2

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An obituary for Marc Platt by William Yardley in The New York Times.

Before he was Marc Platt or Marc Platoff, he was Marcel Emile Gaston Leplat, born on Dec. 2, 1913, in Pasadena, Calif. His father, Maurice, was a violinist who had immigrated from France. The family later moved to Seattle, where his father taught at what is now the Cornish College for the Arts. He began dancing when he was 11.

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A review of New York City Ballet by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

There is another reason the effect of “Rubies” and “Diamonds” has dimmed: The ballet world has fully ripped off their once-novel tricks. The aloof dominatrix in “Rubies,” with her turned-in legs and splayed-out extensions, has become a standard character in countless contemporary works, though not with the towering poise of Teresa Reichlen in Tuesday’s cast. And the classicism and white-tutu overload of “Diamonds” have never gone out of style for ballet choreographers. This was the least impressive part of the evening: Maria Kowroski possesses all the grandeur of presence needed for the central role, but a few stumbles undercut the effect. The flat stage lighting did not help.

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A review of San Francisco Ballet by Janice Berman for San Francisco Classical Voice.

The opener, Symphony No. 9, best illustrated what we think of as the vicissitudes that affected Shostakovich’s artistic life as a culture hero and a musical iconoclast who trod a difficult path in the Stalinist era, hiding undertones of fear and irony like Easter eggs, under layers of nationalistic cheer, not to say fervor. The finds Ratmansky unearthed were especially rewarding here, as the leading couples — Sarah Van Patten and Carlos Quenedit; Simone Messmer and James Sofranko, as well as the dazzling principal Taras Domitro — moved from assurance to collapse, to recovery, to yet another episode of falling down flat on their backs.

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