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Thursday, April 3


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#1 dirac

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 11:22 AM

Reviews of the English National Ballet's new program inspired by World War I.

 

The Evening Standard

 

It's official, pointe shoes are out. The theme of English National Ballet’s new show may look to the past — the centenary of the First World War — but the content is future-focused, jettisoning the pointe shoes for bare feet and classical choreographers for contemporary ones.

 

 

The Independent

 

It’s packed with firsts: big name choreographers Akram Khan, Russell Maliphant and Liam Scarlett making their first works for the company, two new scores, English National Ballet’s own debut at the Barbican. It’s Tamara Rojo’s boldest move since she became director of English National Ballet, and the most exciting.

 

 

The Arts Desk

 

No Man’s Land, which focuses on nameless women in a munitions factory and the menfolk they lose to war, shows Scarlett’s talent on the up-and-up: poignant, clear storytelling and striking design (pictured right) complemented by beautiful choreography. It would have been much tighter with rather less of the beautiful choreography: the emotional hit faded after the strong opening moments.....

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 11:24 AM

More reviews of ENB.

 

The Guardian

 

Russell Maliphant's Second Breath is both more low key and more heart wrenching. Its 20 dancers are united in a keening, spiralling chorus of loss, accompanied by the recorded voices in Andy Cowton's score that recite the terrible numbers of the dead. Here, the most minimal movement can be the most profound register of emotion, but the genius of the work lies in the angry, beautiful duet for Alina Cojocaru and Junor Souza, two broken lovers trying over and over again to reconnect.

 

 

The Stage

 

Khan proves his stellar theatrical judgment - and considerable physical charisma - in Dust, a work for him, Rojo and 10 supporting dancers. Despite a ground-based, bare-footed style, Dust taps the dancer’s strengths, making them look confident and serious - not easy when they are used to tutus and toe shoes.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 01:19 PM

Reviews of San Francisco Ballet.

 

The San Francisco Chronicle

 

In the two hours separating those episodes, the color red reappears in the oddest places. Ratmansky offers a non-narrative account of the life and career of his favorite Russian composer, drawing for inspiration on scores drawn from different periods of Shostakovich's career. For anyone in this city who doubted this choreographer's supreme powers of invention, here was confirmation. The profusion of solos, small ensembles and group outings engulfs the viewer in its variety and sheer flow. "Shostakovich Trilogy" (set in San Francisco by Nancy Raffa) comes close to exhausting you, for all the right reasons.

 

 

The San Jose Mercury News

Section two, set to the "Chamber Symphony," though structurally weakest, is nonetheless pivotal.

 

Here, Ratmansky presents the artist -- a haunted, defiant yet also limpid Davit Karapetyan -- as the victim and his art as the victim's victim: Karapetyan is a broken Apollo. He lines up muselike figures, danced with comic seductiveness by Sasha De Sola, Lorena Feijoo and lovely newcomer Mathilde Froustey. And no surprise -- they are working for the bad guys as well as for sweet Eros.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 01:20 PM

A review of New York City Ballet by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

 

What a crazy night. What a wonderful night. To see three recent works, each one warmed by kooky wit and verve, all specially made for this company and capturing different facets of its spirit, character and energy: This is why we come to the theater.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 01:22 PM

An obituary for patron of the arts Peggy Kahn by David Lyman in The Cincinnati Enquirer.

 

Mrs. Kahn, along with the late Martha Berger, was one of the first two board members of the Cincinnati Civic Ballet, the forerunner of Cincinnati Ballet. Long before the company held its first audition in 1963, Kahn cajoled people to share money, time and resources with an organization that was little more than a well-intentioned pipe dream.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 01:26 PM

More reviews of the English National Ballet.

 

The Financial Times

 

In 1914, my father enlisted in the army, aged 17, and served throughout the war in France. I once asked him: “What was it like?” He replied: “It was hell!” And would speak no more. Watching English National Ballet’s fatuous commemoration of that conflict on Wednesday in the Barbican rat-maze brought his words to mind. Three new choreographies were offered – inspired, we are asked to believe, by the suffering in Flanders’ fields and by that of women who worked and grieved in Blighty – together with the revival of an inane company version of Stravinsky’s Firebird, whose relevance defeats even ENB’s eager casuistry. 

 

 

The Telegraph

 

All were on the theme of the First World War, which tinged the evening with a monochrome melancholy, but the overall impact was thrillingly uplifting since the works were simply so good.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 05:21 PM

Nashville Ballet presents a free performance of "Ferdinand the Bull."

 

The book will come to life through music, dance and narration. Spectators will meet Ferdinand, a rather large but mild-mannered bull who would much rather relax and smell the flowers than chase the fuss in the field like his friends. Through his gentle and lovable personality, his character combines humor and charm to unveil what truly makes each individual special through a dance of colors set in Spain.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 05:23 PM

A preview of Milwaukeee Ballet's Spring Series by Elaine Schmidt in the Journal Sentinel.

Although neither Petrocci nor Harmon has any interest in choreographing works, both said they enjoy the creative process that these new works present.

 

"I definitely embrace interpreting someone else's choreography," Petrocci said, "or being given loose instructions and interpreting them. I dabbled in choreography when I was in school and I enjoyed the experience. But I found that I could never convey what I wanted to my peers very well. It was just frustrating for me."

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 08:58 AM

The Royal Winnipeg Ballet announces the scheduling for the 2014-15 season.

 

They are marking the celebration with an important new commission called A Story of Truth and Reconciliation. It's an enormous undertaking, telling an intimate story about the troubling Aboriginal experience through the beautiful art form of classical ballet. 

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 09:07 AM

An obituary for Marc Platt by David Colker in The Los Angeles Times.

 

Massine said nothing after Platt danced, but five days later he was invited to join the company. Under protest, he was given the name Marc Platoff to maintain the illusion that everyone in Ballet Russe was from Russia. Despite the opulence of the company's productions, Platoff's pay was $150 a month.

 

He left the company in 1942 to try to break into Broadway and make more money. After he changed his name to Marc Platt, he was cast in some short-lived shows before landing "Oklahoma!," which opened in 1943. In the lengthy dream sequence, Platt played the lead part of Curly. New York Times critic Lewis Nichols described him as an "important" dancer.

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 09:24 AM

The Royal Ballet School's museum will feature an exhibition devoted to the career of Darcey Bussell.

 

It will feature photographs and costumes from Bussell’s personal collection, including her Princess Rose costume from Kenneth MacMillan’s 1989 production of The Prince of the Pagodas – after which she was made a principal of the Royal Ballet at the age of 20.

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 09:52 AM

A review of the New York City Ballet in "Jewels" by George Jackson for danceviewtimes.

 

For many seasons, the NYC Ballet’s female corps gave the impression that its extended passages in “Diamonds” served primarily to frame the dancing of the principal couple and give them a breather. Only when the Maryinsky Ballet took the work on did I see the full beauty of Balanchine’s group choreography for the women. It is the womb, the nest in which the central pairing forms and, this time, the NYCB women had come far along the path of being a star corps. In the ballerina role, Maria Kowroski has been regal in the past. Still commanding at times, Kowroski had one very apparent slip but also seemed to be assailed by anxious moments throughout. Tyler Angle, as the principal danseur, managed the partnering with an elegance that did not betray how much he undoubtedly had to help his ballerina. His solo dancing was spacious, supple, strong. Moreover, he looked sovereign.                  

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 13 April 2014 - 12:39 AM

Toni Bentley writes on the photography of John Goodman in The New York Review of Books' blog.

 

It is worth noting that, while ballet is an aristocratic art form founded in the courts of kings and tsars, it has, historically, almost never pulled its actual professionals from the rich or educated. ......... Both boxing and ballet at their highest, so impossible in their respective aims, attract those willing not only to work hard beyond all decency and comfort, but who have the hunger of sheer survival.

 

 

 




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