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New York City Ballet in Montreal, vols. 1-5Orpheus, Serenade, Concerto Barocco, Agon, Apollo, Unicorn, Coppelia,


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#136 Dale

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 08:26 AM

From the YouTube preview (The Bell Telephone Hour Apollo has interesting costumes. Maybe the TV censors wanted the muse's arms covered up? That ballet has certainly had several costume changes since it arrived at it's current state):

 

 

The notes:

The fifth volume of New York City Ballet in Montreal features two Balanchine masterpieces, created 35 years apart. The beautiful and exotic Bugaku (1963) is seen here in a 1978 color telecast starring Patricia McBride and Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux. McBride, one of New York City Ballet’s most celebrated ballerinas, will be awarded the Kennedy Center Honor next month. Apollo (1928) was a milestone in the early part of Balanchine’s career. Jacques d’Amboise dances the title role in a 1960 performance of the complete ballet (followed by an interview with Balanchine), as well as in excerpts of the work as presented on the Bell Telephone Hour in 1963. The latter telecast provides a rare opportunity to see an early performance of Apollo in color and Melissa Hayden as Terpsichore (her only appearance in this DVD series).

Color & Black & white, 71 minutes, 4:3, NTSC (Playable all regions)

BUGAKU
Choreography by George Balanchine
Music by Toshiro Mayuzumi
Dancers: Patricia McBride, Jean-Pierre Bonnefoux, Bonita Borne, Elyse Borne, Elise Flagg, Delia Peters, John Bass, Richard Dryden, Laurence Matthews, Richard Tanner (1978)

APOLLO (complete)
Choreography by George Balanchine
Music by Igor Stravinsky
Dancers: Jacques d‘Amboise (Apollo), Diana Adams (Terpsichore), Jillana (Calliope), Francia Russell (Polyhymnia) (1960)

GEORGE BALANCHINE DISCUSSES APOLLO (1960)

APOLLO (three movements)
Choreography by George Balanchine
Music by Igor Stravinsky
Variation d’Apollon • Pas de deux (Apollo and Terpsichore) Coda (Apollo and the Muses)
Dancers: Jacques d‘Amboise (Apollo), Melissa Hayden (Terpsichore), Jillana (Calliope), Patricia Neary (Polyhymnia)
(Bell Telephone Hour, 1963)



#137 volcanohunter

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 08:32 AM

Okay, if they're going to include things not from Montréal, why not also the 1966 BBC Apollo with d'Amboise/Farrell/Govrin/Neary? Grr.

 

ICA Classics has pulled a few things out of the BBC archives. Perhaps they could be persuaded to go after the 1966 Apollo.

 

http://www.icaclassics.com/dance



#138 sandik

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 08:37 AM

The 1963 version had a very interesting set of stairs upstage, as well as the sleeves.



#139 Dale

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 03:37 PM

The 1963 version had a very interesting set of stairs upstage, as well as the sleeves.

The set designer probably tried to do something so that Apollo could climb the stairs at the end. This would have been before Balanchine cut parts of the ballet in the late 70s. It would have had the original Apotheosis.



#140 sandik

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Posted 19 November 2014 - 09:36 PM

 

The 1963 version had a very interesting set of stairs upstage, as well as the sleeves.

The set designer probably tried to do something so that Apollo could climb the stairs at the end. This would have been before Balanchine cut parts of the ballet in the late 70s. It would have had the original Apotheosis.

 

 

I'm just wondering why they chose this little hill (which actually looks rather like one of the original designs) rather than the ladder-like structure that was standard at the time.



#141 emilienne

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Posted 20 November 2014 - 03:14 PM

Bell Telephone Hour always seemed to have outrageous sets, which makes me suspect (facetiously) that the set designer had frustrated ambitions. The Art of Maria Tallchief featured a Don Q grand pas de deux with Erik Bruhn that featured the couple trying to dance around large lacy fans that opened and closed.




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