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Monday, March 31


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#1 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 03:42 PM

A review of Texas Ballet Theater by Cheryl Callon for TheaterJones.

 

The various poses and sheer number of dancers on stage create a wonderful aesthetic, and numerous points during the work turn into picture-perfect moments. The cast does contain six men, and although soloists Carl Coomer and Alexander Kotelenets produce some favorable highlights, this piece [Serenade] is all about the ladies. Principal dancers Carolyn Judson, Leticia Oliveira, and Betsy McBride shine in each of their solos, but the rest of the cast has plenty of opportunity to display their skills. It’s truly a beautiful work, one that deserves its illustrious status.

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 07:41 PM

Wendy Whelan will leave New York City Ballet in October.

 

Ms. Whelan said she was recovering well from a hip injury that required surgery and sidelined her, forcing the postponement of a national tour of “Restless Creature” that had been scheduled for this spring. “I’m making some steady progress,” she said, adding that she hopes to dance with City Ballet this spring and to dance this summer in Saratoga, N.Y.; London; and Vail, Colo. The “Restless Creature” tour has been rescheduled for next year.

 

 

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 07:47 PM

Wayne McGregor will make a new piece based on writings by Virginia Woolf.

 

Woolf Works, which is inspired by the novels Mrs Dalloway, Orlando and The Waves, will adopt a “non-linear narrative” familiar to readers of the English modernist.

 

 

Related.

 

Meanwhile Hofesh Schechter will make his Royal Ballet debut by choreographing a new piece for the company as part of a triple bill in March. His work will be staged alongside George Balanchine’s The Four Temperaments and Kenneth MacMillan’s Song of the Earth.

 

 

More.

 

....Set to a commissioned score by Max Richter, it will be based on different texts by Virginia Woolf, including “Mrs. Dalloway,” “Orlando” and “The Waves,” and will feature the former Royal Ballet and American Ballet Theater principal Alessandra Ferri. “I want to make a nonlinear narrative, a collage of sensation, time, tone and emotion—new structural possibilities,” Mr. McGregor wrote in an email.

 

 

Comment from Judith Mackrell in The Guardian's blog.

 

Yet aside from the controversy value of these two commissions (and oh yes, there will be controversy) the headline of the new season is surely the all-Ashton programme which will bring together Scènes de Ballet and Symphonic Variations in one evening.

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 07:53 PM

A preview of the new Royal Opera House season in opera and ballet by Rupert Christiansen in The Telegraph.

 

The Royal Ballet’s ranks still need strengthening, but the repertory offers the dancers plenty of challenges. Wayne McGregor will present a new full-length “narrative, but non-linear” work inspired by the writings of Virginia Woolf, and bringing the return to the company of the wonderful Alessandra Ferri in a leading role. Another intriguing novelty is the commission of a one-act piece from maverick Israeli dance-maker Hofesh Shechter, who has not previously worked in a balletic idiom.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 07:54 PM

Photo gallery of auditions in Saratoga for New York City Ballet's summer engagement.

 

One hundred girls tried out for the 48 spots. The girls chosen will perform with the New York City Ballet this summer at SPAC in the Circus Polka.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 07:55 PM

A review of Boston Ballet by Dale Brauner for danceviewtimes.

 

Misa Kuranaga might have studied at the School of American Ballet but she’s taken to the Ashton style. Kuranaga, who was a successful Lise in Ashton’s “La Fille mal gardée,” sparkled as Cinderella. She showed off strong epaulement, lyric expression and clarity in the legs. Kurangaga was sweet and alert in Act I, fully engaged, even when just sitting by the fire watching her stepsisters’ antics. In Act II, her face showed both shyness and expectation at being at the ball. By the third act, she was entrancing.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 07:58 PM

The painter Mark Stock has died at age 72.

 

He soon headed for Los Angeles and landed a job as a lithographer at Gemini G.E.L., a fine arts publisher where he worked with luminaries such as Jasper Johns and David Hockney. A student of ballet and modern dance, he designed sets for the Los Angeles Chamber Ballet. He moved to the Bay Area after the Modernism Gallery in San Francisco started displaying his work.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 08:00 PM

Marc Platt is dead at age 100.

 

Marcel LePlat was born on Dec. 2, 1913, in Pasadena. In the 1920s, his family moved to Seattle, where his early dance training took place under Mary Ann Wells. It was Wells who advised the young man to audition for the renowned Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, then led by Colonel Wassily De Basil. Choreographer Leonide Massine hired the good-looking, tall, red-headed American and changed his name to Marc Platoff, to match the Russian image of the company.

 

 

Related.

 

In Seven Brides for Seven Brothers -- choreographed by the legendary Michael Kidd and one of the earliest CinemaScope movies made for MGM -- Platt played Daniel, one of the rugged Pontipee brothers living in the Oregon mountains in the 1850s. He marries Martha (Norma Doggett) in the film.

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 08:04 PM

A preview in brief of Minnesota Dance Theatre.

 

Dancer-choreographers Martine van Hamel (American Ballet Theatre) and Adam Hendrickson (New York City Ballet) will have their work featured for the first time in the Twin Cities by Minnesota Dance Theatre (MDT)....

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 05:32 PM

A review of the Bolshoi Ballet in 'Marco Spada' by Alastair Macaulay in The New York Times.

 

But the other two casts I watched were also admirable. Though these roles aren’t richly characterized, they keep offering vivid moments, and all the solo dancers found particular opportunities to distinguish themselves. It’s hard for a dancer to succeed in Spada’s many athletic variations while seeming old enough to be Angela’s father. Mr. Hallberg, though authoritative and lucid, was the least successful in this respect, whereas the young Igor Tsvirko (who danced Pepinelli on Sunday) managed to play Spada on Saturday with unusual weight, impressively seeming twice his age without loss of grace.

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 05:35 PM

A review of Jose Mateo Ballet Theatre by Jeffrey Gantz in The Boston Globe.

 

Mateo has a knack for arresting images. At one stage, a line of eight women traverse the back of the stage in slow motion, on pointe. And when Rachmaninoff makes reference to the plainsong “Dies irae,” Mateo has two women stand in fourth position with their backs to the men who are lying at their feet. By the end, though, the rowing rhythm has merged with the “Dies irae” motif, and the dancers are back in their spotlights, not standing, as they were at the beginning, but grounded, as if in prayer.

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 05:41 PM

The number of people viewing Royal Opera House performances via broadcast is likely to exceed those attending live for the first time.

 

The Royal Opera House announced today that audiences for its 2014/15 Live Cinema Season are expected to exceed the 670,000 who visit Covent Garden annually.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 05:42 PM

Alex Beard expresses disbelief in the concept of "democratizing art."

 

Mr Beard said Covent Garden’s open-house policies had dispelled the notion that it was the preserve of a socially exclusive audience. “I don’t subscribe to democratising art but I do believe in democratising access, by opening up the institution to transformative experiences.

 

“We have increased the number of ways that people can experience what we do, and they represent great value.”

 



#14 dirac

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Posted 05 April 2014 - 05:47 AM

A review of the cinema broadcast of the Bolshoi Ballet in 'Marco Spada' by Carrie Seidman in The Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

Hallberg is called upon to do it all — exhausting leap sequences, ridiculously fast and repetitious beats and precise footwork and countless chains of pirouettes — and he does it all exceedingly well. Even his extensive pantomime, generally not a strength for American dancers, is expressive and, for the most part, fathomable.

 

Which is a lot more than I can say for the story line.......

 




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