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Saturday, March 29


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8 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:39 AM

A review of Maine State Ballet's 'Cinderella' by Jennifer Brewer in the Maine Sunday Telegram.

The iconic waltz, which closes out the second act, was lovely, performed by a large troupe of Star Fairies in sparkling blue, dancing in classic formations. The Fairy Godmother (Veronica Druchniak) was accompanied by the Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter fairies, who each performed a sprightly solo.

 

 

As the Spring Fairy, Elizabeth Dragoni (who will portray Cinderella on Sundays throughout the run) was sparkling and remarkably light, even in her jumps. Her hands and face were amazing. Katie Farwell as the Winter Fairy was regal and lifted, with long, beautiful balances.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:41 AM

A review of BalletMet Columbus and Cincinnati Ballet by David Lyman in The Cincinnati Enquirer.

It’s enormous, too, with the final section overwhelming the stage with 48 dancers, a number only possible through this two-company collaboration.

 

Opening night, much of the corps de ballet lacked the precision necessary to give this work its full impact. But the dancing of soloists and principal dancers made up for it, especially Maizyalet Velázquez, Gema Diaz and, in the second movement, the particularly moving performances of Sarah Hairston and Zack Grubbs.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:42 AM

A review of Milwaukee Ballet by Carla Escoda in The Huffington Post.

 

The other world première in this program, by Matthew Neenan, sweeps us up in the swellegant retro chic of Pink Martini. With sly humor and a touch of pathos, Neenan draws a dramatic arc across a selection of their songs in English, French and Croatian - variously shot through with Latin rhythms, a big band sound, and echoes of the world-weary Edith Piaf. In one of many whimsical moments, the ensemble shuffles and struts with deadpan expressions as the adorable Courtney Kramer illuminates "Hang on, Little Tomato," a trippy tune with 1930s' pop undertones, inspired by an old Hunt's Ketchup commercial ("just hang on, hang on to the vine.")

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:44 AM

A review of the Moscow Festival Ballet by Tresca Weinstein in The Albany Times Union.

 

Perhaps the best part of this production is the casting of the main roles (with the exception of Berthe). Evgeniy Rudakov (Hilarion) is a buff, slightly unkempt man of the woods whose courting of Giselle lacks subtlety but rings true. Konstantin Marikin (Albrecht, known as Loys in his peasant disguise) has all the grace and regal bearing that Hilarion lacks, but we believe in his love, too. Sokolnikova is Kewpie-doll perfect—petite, wholesome and light as a feather.

 

A review by Wendy Liberatore in The Daily Gazette.

 

Because this story is one of the oldest that ballet has to offer, it can feel slow and stodgy, like one long adagio. But the Moscow Festival Ballet’s rendering, as seen at Proctors on Friday night, is one of the best seen in these parts in decades. This is surprising because the Moscow Festival Ballet’s productions often seem tired and ho-hum, perhaps because the company is constantly on tour.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:49 AM

Alina Cojocaru comments on photos of things, people, and events in her life for The Daily Mail.

 

Johan and I were in Harrods three years ago when we found Charlie - a chihuahua - in the pet department. I'd always wanted a dog but didn't think we had time to look after one. Charlie fits into our lives perfectly, and comes with me to practice every day.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:51 AM

A review of the Stuttgart Ballet's 'Giselle' by Ilona Landgraf for Landgraf on Dance.

 

The seasoned Alicia Amatriain danced the title role. Somewhat subdued at first (maybe to indicate Giselle's frail health), Amatriain's spirits mounted as Albrecht wooed her. Her mad scene was strong, revealing how completely reality was shattered for her because of Albrecht's insincerity. Amatriain's second act Giselle was a downcast spiritual being, still burdened by what had happened to her in life. This was no romantic heroine dying happily so that her lover might flourish. Spiritually loving, she was afraid for Albrecht. She sustained and protected him as much as she could, but it was apparent that she had already slipped far into the after-life. Abandoned were any signs of her former passion.

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:55 AM

A review of Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montreal in "Rodin/Claudel" by Natasha Gauthier in The Ottawa Citizen.

 

Things greatly improve in Act II, where the dancing finally begins to flow. Throughout the ballet, Quanz uses 12 dancers from the corps as living “sculptures”; they are the strongest and most compelling element in the work, particularly in the second Act. Costumed in barely there, flesh-coloured underwear, they shift subtly between active and passive, observer and participant, purer and more noble than the sculptors who moulded them.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 05:58 AM

A feature on the life and work of Antony Tudor by Carrie Seidman in The Sarasota Herald-Tribune.

The young and timid Barbieri, at the same time facing her first role with the company's leading male dancer, was a nervous wreck before her first rehearsal for "Knight Errant." She was not reassured when she encountered a stream of traumatized dancers leaving the studio after a session with Tudor.

 

"Out come all these dancers in a flood of tears," Barbieri recalls. "I was terrified. He had these incredible beady eyes and you felt like he saw through to your inner soul. But he must have taken one look at me and thought, 'If I say anything, she'll collapse,' because he was very patient with me. And I adored working with him because he got so much out of me."

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 11:39 AM

American Ballet Theatre perform "Coppelia" in Abu Dhabi.

 

The story is simple: the lonely toymaker Dr Coppelius surrounds himself with life-size clockwork dolls; his favourite is Coppélia, who at the start of the ballet is posed on his balcony as if reading. Franz (the vigorous, virile Herman Cornejo), a young townsman, catches sight of her and becomes infatuated, forgetting his fiancée Swanilda (a divine turn by the supremely talented Misty Copeland).

 




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