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Friday, March 28


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#1 dirac

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 04:52 PM

A brief piece on ballet in opera by Joan Acocella in the April 7 issue of The New Yorker.

 

Now the situation is changing again. Dance is being given a place in opera, not so much in the form of the big, happy intermezzi of yesteryear but as the thing that everyone said it couldn’t be: a plot advancement. At the Y, Henkel will show video clips and talk to two choreographers, Carolyn Choa and Doug Varone. Varone choreographed the seven-veils solo for Karita Mattila in the Met’s 2004 “Salome.” Because Mattila took everything off, and looked very nice naked, the latter was a sensation, but it was also a lesson. Dance can be an actor in opera. 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 04:55 PM

A look behind the scenes at rehearsals for Justin Peck's new ballet by Sarah Kaufman in The Washington Post.

Watching Peck’s ballet take shape is an exhilarating rush, like seeing pearls whirl down a water slide, free and inevitable and utterly delightful.

 

It is also an exercise in comic confusion. The pianist races along with terrific propulsion; the music is all galloping drive and slippery swoops. Trying to keep up, two dancers bump into each other; another one stumbles and is nearly steamrolled by the next wave of flying legs.

 

 

Related.

Say Beyonce asks you to be her choreographer. What will you do for her?

 

Probably have her move in a much more visceral way. If you look at her body in ballet terms, it’s sort of idiosyncratic, so I’d figure out a way to create an original piece on her, using how she moves. I mean, she’s an amazing performer and an amazing mover. Maybe I’d put her in something that isn’t set to her own music, either someone she admires or maybe even some completely different genre of music. I think that could be really exciting. And I’d present it somewhere different, like a theater setting, like BAM [the Brooklyn Academy of Music].

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 04:57 PM

A feature on the S&R Foundation, which will be funding live music for some of Washington Ballet's performances, by Anne Midgette in The Washington Post.

 

When private citizens, backed by extensive funding, decide that they want to make a mark on the arts, things can move very quickly indeed. More common in the world of large-scale arts philanthropy are the large-scale gifts: David M. Rubenstein donating the Kennedy Center Organ; Paul G. Stern helping support WPAS’s presentation of the Israel Philharmonic this weekend. It’s less common for private, low-profile citizens — and the doctors were quite low-profile before their $33 million purchases landed them in the city’s gossip columns — to start their own organizations and then integrate themselves into the community.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 04:58 PM

Reviews of the Royal Ballet in "The Sleeping Beauty."

 

The Guardian

 

In the first production I saw, the company looked to have found one of the great Auroras in Akane Takada. Physically tiny, she dances with a thrilling ballerina reach, but using the power of her supple, expressive back to stretch a legato phrase so that it shimmers mid-air. Most engagingly, she gives Aurora an inner world: her eyes and hands in constant, eloquent dialogue with the stage around her.

 

 

The Independent

 

Takada and Muntagirov make this a strong evening, but the ballet around them is still too timid. Monica Mason and Christopher Newton set out to recreate the Royal Ballet’s iconic 1946 production, which reopened the Royal Opera House after the war. Some of Oliver Messel’s fantasy designs look dated, while there’s a sense of caution in the staging. In the prologue, the fairy soloists are bland: these dances should be full of contrast and character, but you’d never know it.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 05:01 PM

Injury keeps Natalia Osipova out of "The Sleeping Beauty."

 

“X-rays showed no bone fractures,” the Royal Opera House said in a statement, but Ms. Osipova “sustained a significant degree of soft tissue trauma” to her back.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 05:04 PM

A review of the Paul Taylor Dance Company by Carol Pardo for danceviewtimes.

 

As a palate cleanser before "Piazzolla", Tiler Peck and Robert Fairchild, of the New York City Ballet, appeared in the pas de deux from "Airs." The two danced the piece barefoot. Although their accent on the airborne confirmed their ballet background, they looked happy and secure, even when she stood on his thigh, and fully alive to the music. Dance companies seek connections too; as a gesture of amity between two constituents of the David H. Koch Theater and as an amuse-bouche for an attentive and enthusiastic gala audience, their presence of the two colleagues and guests was a great success.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 04 April 2014 - 09:04 AM

An interview with Helgi Tomasson.

 

 Meanwhile, he focused on the dancing. “It started with the long adagio, so I thought, why don’t I have two couples, and split it up, and then bring them both back together.” To originate the roles, Tomasson chose Yuan Yuan Tan and Luke Ingham as one couple, and Maria Kochetkova and Vitor Luiz as the other. The two ballerinas can inspire a study in contrasts. “Yuan Yuan is beautiful and lyrical. Her fluidity is remarkable. Masha [Kochetkova’s nickname] also can be lyrical, but we tend to see her in fast-moving things. Here, we’ll be using both qualities.” Their partners are correspondingly different as well. Ingham’s a tall, classically elegant Australian who joined the company as a soloist in 2012 from the Houston Ballet and has danced all principal roles; Luiz, a Brazilian wizard of pyrotechnics, joined as a principal dancer from the Rio Municipal Ballet in 2009.

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 05:43 AM

A profile of Irina Tsikurishvili by Rebecca Ritzel in The Washington Post.

She remembers the mid-1980s night when the Dance Theatre of Harlem came to Tbilisi. Wearing high heels and miniskirts, Irina and a friend crawled under the theater’s chairs and hid for eight hours until the performance began. She knew the dancers were going to perform works by George Balanchine.

 

“George Balanchine was from Georgia, you know,” Irina said, emphatically.

 

 




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