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Friday, March 21


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#1 dirac

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Posted 21 March 2014 - 12:58 PM

An interview with dancer Jesse Lyon.

 

The upcoming New Works Festival, this year’s Richmond Ballet Studio 2, gives Jesse the opportunity to dance and watch his colleagues dance pieces from all sides of the spectrum. His fellow Richmond Ballet II dancer Gavin Stewart explores his choreographer side, to the delight of Jesse and the rest of the participating dancers. “It’s the first time he’s choreographed a big company like this, so it was great to see how the communication was so easy. Also, everyone wants to make Gavin’s piece good because he’s a friend.”

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:37 AM

A review of Alberta Ballet's 'Giselle' by Stephan Bonfield in The Calgary Herald.

 

In fact, the White Act was astonishing in places, a perfect study in breath-taking beauty and kinesthetics all fused into one art work. I won’t soon forget the beauty of the Wilis’ grands pas moving gracefully in hypnotic, intercalated allongées, stunning symmetries and in near-perfect unity. They were virtually flawless, and when not moving, stood as frozen moments in time epitomizing statutes of idealist Antiquity. Flavia Vallone, the well-known choreographer from La Scala who was brought in to make the required artistic adaptations, made this translucent scene one of my favourites.

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:41 AM

Smuin Ballet's 20th anniversary gala pulls in $350,000.

 

"Beyond Ballet," showcasing the best of Michael Smuin and the Smuin Ballet over the 20 years, was the highlight of the evening, beginning with three couples dancing to "Organito de la Tarde" from "Tango Palace" (2003) and ending with "Um a Zero (1x 0)" from "Obigado, Brazil" (2006).

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:43 AM

Pennsylvania Ballet gives a benefit performance this weekend.

 

She says every month, the non-profit provides tens of thousands of free, medically appropriate meals to hundreds of people suffering from life threatening illnesses. MANNA has a close relationship with the Pennsylvania Ballet that goes back 22 years when HIV and AIDS hit the dance community especially hard.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 02:44 PM

The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh visit the Rambert dance studios.

The Queen and Philip met the group during a guided tour of the purpose built £19.6 million building on London's South Bank where Rambert is now based.

 

Rambert, which spent 12 years raising the money for the new headquarters after outgrowing its former premieses in a converted carpet warehouse in Chiswick, west London, moved into the new modern building close to the National Theatre in December. It contains dance studios, treatment and body conditioning rooms, workshops, offices and an archive.

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 02:45 PM

A review of the Northern Ballet in 'Cinderella' by Kelly Apter in The Scotsman.

 

But it is the transformational scene that audiences will remember most. With the fairy godmother replaced by an intentionally haphazard magician, the conjurer comes into his own when he gives Cinderella and her dirty dish-filled kitchen the mother of all makeovers, right in front of our eyes. It’s a moment that, quite rightly, gets its own round of applause. But what Nixon also succeeds in doing is giving this story more emotional depth. The cruel stepmother has a believable back-story, the prince is fallible – and the relationship between him and Cinderella touchingly real.

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 02:46 PM

A review of Alonzo King Lines Ballet by Brian Seibert in The New York Times.

 

His choreography does something like that over and over. Dancers continually come and go, and most of the work’s many sections have “enough of that” endings. Consequently, the only cumulative force that “Constellation” acquires is entropic. It keeps disintegrating.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 02:47 PM

The Joffrey Ballet visits Houston.

At Wheater's invitation, Welch set his complex and athletic three-movement work Son of Chamber Symphony on the Joffrey Ballet company in 2010. Welch has been said to give the corps de ballet choreography more often set on principal dancers and soloists. That tendency is evident in Son of Chamber Symphony.

 

"Technically, it's very difficult," Wheater tells us. "It's really demanding for everybody. And the thing about it is that the company's completely exposed; you can really hone in and see what the company can do, what each dancer is capable of. What I love in Stanton's work is that he believes in the language of classical ballet. He wants to keep people having to work at it and to be on their game. In the piece you can see everything that's required of us as a classical dancer. and it's in a very contemporary way."

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:11 AM

Sarah Crompton goes backstage with the Mariinsky Ballet.

 

Certainly, the workload imposed by the new theatre, which means the ballet company performs up to seven times a week (there is also a concert hall to be filled and constant touring), resulted last summer in the unprecedented recruitment of 40 new dancers. They followed in the wake of other recent imports, most notably Xander Paris, the first British dancer ever to be hired by the Mariinsky.

 

 

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:17 AM

A Q&A in brief with Wendy Whelan.

 

What were some of the things you felt you had to learn or unlearn?

I had to unlearn the idea of being upright, which is essential to ballet. I had to learn how to drop my weight into the ground, to open up my spine a little bit more. I wanted them to take me into their world and not cater to me. A lot of times choreographers are like, “Well, how does that feel? Where do you think we should go next?” [These choreographers] weren’t wishy-washy at all, which I loved.

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 31 March 2014 - 07:51 PM

A preview of Colorado Ballet's new program by in The Denver Post. Hat tip to YouOverThere for the link!

 

In the case of the ballet, it's a Colorado company dancing to the music of a Colorado band. The piece was created by Sandra Brown, who has been working with the city's premiere dance ensemble for eight years. DeVotchKa's music is natural for dance with its swirl of complicated emotions and layers of everything from indie rock to cabaret to Eastern European folk tunes. "I could see the movement in it right away," Brown said.

 

 

 




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