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Friday, March 7


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#1 dirac

dirac

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:43 PM

Reviews of the Washington Ballet's "British Invasion" program.

 

The Washington Post

 

Each piece had a few standout moments. Jared Nelson, one of the company’s prime technicians, preened outrageously in “Rooster,” with a three-day growth of stubble, while at another point Morgann Rose was tossed overhead in a breathtaking spiral, like an Archimedes’ screw, as the rising tension of “Ruby Tuesday” trilled from the Stones’ throats like an orchestral crescendo. In “A Day in the Life,” the revelation was seeing Brooklyn Mack, the company’s jumper, padding around softly and lending a velvety rebound to the stuttering steps of “Mother Nature’s Son.”

 

 

Washington Life

 

Sandwiched between the so-called battle of the bands in the second act is “There Where She Loved,” originally performed by the company in 2005. Choreographed by Christopher Wheeldon, with music by Frederic Chopin and Kurt Weill, the piece mixes classical ballet with modern movements. Through its seven songs — which aren’t narratively linked but work together in theme — the ballet tells the story of romantic relationships in different stages of ebb and flow. Soprano CarrieAnne Winter and mezzo soprano Shelley Waite flank the stage, trading songs of romance, unrequited love, bitterness, loss and farewells, accompanied by Glenn Sales on piano........ Audience members who expected a rocking, rollicking good time throughout the evening may have found the second act lost momentum. Perhaps love is not all you need, as this piece may have had more room to shine in the context of a different show.

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:45 PM

A look back at some memorable Cincinnati Ballet performances by David Lyman in The Cincinnati Enquirer.

 

'Seventh Symphony' – 2004

 

Léonide Massine's 1938 masterpiece, set to Beethoven's Symphony No. 7, was a legendary piece of choreography danced by the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. But no one had seen it for decades. Artistic director emeritus Frederic Franklin, who had appeared in the original ballet, worked hand in hand with Cincinnati Ballet artistic associate Johanna Bernstein Wilt to re-create it. The result was regarded as one of the ballet world's major triumphs of the year.

 

 

A look at some memorable Cincinnati Ballet people, also by Lyman.

 

Vandergriff-Adams is the company's wardrobe mistress, still a member of the department where she began 43 years ago. She has stories to tell about almost anyone who has had anything to do with the company. Artistic directors, dancers, designers, office staff – she has not only known them all, but has been a confidante and a sounding board for most.

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:50 PM

A long article at what happens to dancers who are retiring or on the verge, with a focus on Wendy Whelan. Story by Maroosha Muzaffar in The Atlantic.

 

One of Whelan’s chief concerns, too, is her financial security. “After this, I have to either find a job teaching, find a way to pay my rent. Find a way to get insurance. Start all over again with making an income,” she said. “We are not supported federally at all once we leave the ballet. There is no support whatsoever, financially or insurance wise for dancers in the United States.

 

“In Europe, very often there is federal support,” she added. “They take care of their people. Here, no care at the end.”

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 10:07 PM

Evan McKie writes on the challenges of dancing ballet's princes.

 

I once heard a male ballet dancer say they were tired of playing "just" the Prince roles. OK, granted a male dancer needs the acting challenges that a female dancer is accustomed to, but is a ballet Prince really an easy part to fit into? And why do so many audiences feel that only few gents are convincing while donning the tights and bodice required to stand behind a ballerina?

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 10:09 PM

Alastair Macaulay writes on the current state of dance in opera.

 

Dance and movement in opera seldom combine powerfully today. Because opera is now largely a form of director’s theater, it’s usually more important that its dances fit in with the surrounding drama than that they be rewarding as independent choreography. That’s true in the Met’s recent “Die Fledermaus”: The director Jeremy Sams turns the party into what his translation calls “a soiree with a binge on top,” and so has a silly, scantily clad ballet as part of it. Stephen Mear, choreographing, does the silliness nicely. But this frolic — ballet is not his strong point — trivializes his talent, which in several musicals has proved considerable. It’s hard even to remember the dances by Kim Brandstrup for the Met’s recent “Eugene Onegin.”

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 10:11 PM

David Lister writes on the integration (or non-integration) of minority dancers into the big companies.

 

For I have to pinch myself when I see that the Royal Opera House is hosting several nights devoted to a company purely for artists from certain ethnic minorities. Why? If companies such as the Royal Ballet, which is in the same building, are not recruiting sufficient black or Asian dancers, and ignoring their talent, then we need to know about it.

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 08 March 2014 - 10:35 PM

The dancers of New York City Ballet agree to a new contract.

 

Neither side announced details of the agreement, which they said would increase wages but reduce the number of guaranteed paid weeks to 37 from 38. The contract, ratified this week, will also establish a formal process for dancers to share ideas about artistic and marketing decisions, and install gym equipment on the fifth floor of the David H. Koch Theater.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 06:07 AM

A preview of the National Ballet of Canada's "Swan Lake."

 

From the very first days when Celia Franca formed the company in 1951, there has been a National Ballet Orchestra — a decision, Briskin says, that put music smack dab in the middle of the ballet’s success.

 

The most important thing to remember about the music is “We tell the story,” says Briskin.

 

 




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