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ABT To Unveil New Sleeping Beauty For 75th Anniversary


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#31 atm711

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 09:15 AM

Does Koch have his hand in any ballet companies out of New York.......does anyone know??



#32 MJ

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 08:08 AM

I actually liked the "disney" version of SB. The scenery and costumers were gorgeous. I did not quite understand the spiderweb part. 

 

Ratminski is doing a great job, I hope he does more work with ABT.

 

What I would like to see in a SB:

 

When Carabotte enters the court, I'd like to see some some magical ability besides the wig. Maybe supervillan invulnerability or something. The whole court should be in absolute fear when she enters. The role is always well acted, I'd like something that will scare little girls, but not too much. Snakes and Spiders come to mind. A carriage pulled by Spiders?

 

The Fairy's gifts should be more symbolic, a prop you can see from the cheap seats

 

Prince Phillip should actually scale the castle or get the drawbridge to come down. Something dramatic. This Castle has been unguarded for 100 years. The Prince is risking his life for the love of  his life. Climbing the vines would involve stunt and wire work that the company may not want to risk. 

 

The costumes in the wedding scene should be very different from act I, it is hundred years later. The Mazurka is the main dance, so I'd like to see something eastern-europe looking. 



#33 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 08:13 AM

I often read so much animosity on ABT's production of the classics, but to be honest, I don't have any problem with them.  When I went to London and saw the Bolshoi's versions, I disliked them way more than those of ABT.  Actually, ABT is probably one of the very few companies that retains the original SL's double suicide original ending, and Makarova's Bayadere successfully goes back to the complete resolution of the ballet, as it was originally intended, unlike the Russian one.  The Bolshoi has truncated,weird stagings,, and Grigorovitch's SB is no exception.  That floor pattern is a complete disaster when looked from afar.  I actually think the Disney aura of ABT's SB is not a bad thing.  The cartoonish looking of the sets gives it a vintage feeling, very much like the American companies of the past.  The one thing that could be reworked with success would be the re incorporation of certain missing sections as per the current staging, like the Precious Stones Pas de Trois.



#34 MJ

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 08:15 AM

 

 I wish there was some way the "Entr'acte symphonique" between Scenes I and II of Act II could be incorporated. Though it was cut from the original production, I think it's some of the most beautiful music in the score. It would be hard to justify its inclusion from a dramatic standpoint and I realize it probably has no place in a production focused on historical reconstruction, but I love that section of music nonetheless.   

 

No.16 Scène

 

No.17 Panorama

  • Interpolation: 3 transitional bars for the end of no.17 composed by Riccardo Drigo to lead into no.19, as no.18 was cut in the original production

No.18 Entr'acte symphonique (solo for violin composed for Leopold Auer, cut from the original production)
 

Scene II — Le château de la belle au bois dormant No.19 Scène du château de sommeil

 

I love that entr'acte. The Mariinsky does it during its Sleeping Beauty, and even though the curtain goes down, the auditorium goes dark except a spotlight on the violinist and the whole orchestra is mechanically raised during this portion, it is a breath-taking moment! It is so lovely!

 

 

I performed in Mr. B's Nut for several years in Act I, I would stand at the pit door afterward to listen to that gorgeous solo. every night. 



#35 sandik

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 08:26 AM

You know, with the spectacular advances in stage technology over the last several years, a smart designer could make a truly magical "panorama" scene using lights/projections that would give the sense of moving through the world and arriving at the castle without using expensive mechanical effects...



#36 Natalia

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 09:20 AM

NYCB/Martins did a 'projection-heavy' version 20+ years ago.Quite lovely. That said, nothing says "WOW" like gorgeous old-fashioned painted sets, a-la Mariinsky's 1890 Beauty or the Royal's incomparable designs by Messell. In other words, the opposite of 'El Cheapo.'



#37 MJ

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 11:20 AM

Does the Met still have a stage turntable? I recall seeing Die Fleidermaus set that rotated. Even if ABT took advantage of the Met's huge stage, it does not travel well.



#38 Birdsall

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 02:43 PM

NYCB/Martins did a 'projection-heavy' version 20+ years ago.Quite lovely. That said, nothing says "WOW" like gorgeous old-fashioned painted sets, a-la Mariinsky's 1890 Beauty or the Royal's incomparable designs by Messell. In other words, the opposite of 'El Cheapo.'

Even when I was just an opera lover I used to tell my opera friends that it is funny how the U.S. uses all these elaborate 3-D opera sets that are crazy, updated or outlandish productions with huge price tags, and then you see something at the Mariinsky or another European theatre with old fashioned painted backdrops, and your senses are much more fulfilled. 

 

One example is the Met's recent Ring Cycle. I know some will disagree, but they spent so much money reinforcing the stage to fit that "Machine" on the stage and it was ugly and in most scenes just sat there like a bunch of metal planks, so what was the point? To me it was the biggest production disaster in the history of opera. And probably most expensive disaster in opera.  

 

Then, you go to an opera at the Mariinsky with old fashioned painted backdrops and you feel totally involved in the magic. 



#39 bingham

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 06:07 AM

      According to their website , Ballet of the La Scala Opera is doing A Ratmansky's new Sleeping Beauty on Oct 2015 as a coproduction with ABT. That makes sense in the present economic conditions especially for expensive productions like this. Alexei is also doing a new full-length Paquita, based on the Stepanov notations, for the Bavarian State Ballet this December. It would be wonderful if ABT can coproduce this or acquire it later.



#40 California

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 06:36 AM

      According to their website , Ballet of the La Scala Opera is doing A Ratmansky's new Sleeping Beauty on Oct 2015 as a coproduction with ABT. That makes sense in the present economic conditions especially for expensive productions like this. 

Note that the only casting announced so far for the La Scala production is Zakharova and Hallberg. As Ratmansky seems to have a lot of control over the casting in his ballets, we might wonder if that means Hallberg will also be in the ABT production in 2015 at the Met and perhaps even the Segerstrom premiere. It's interesting that Bolle, a La Scala principal, is not listed, nor is Osipova, a regular La Scala guest and Ratmansky favorite. Of course, this might change:  

 

http://www.teatroall...ing-beauty.html



#41 abatt

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 06:50 AM

I noticed that the running time is 3 hours, including intermission.  Hopefully this means that the Ratmansky version will restore all of those wedding act divertissements that McKenzie inexplicably cut in the interest of getting the kids home early.



#42 onxmyxtoes

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 07:10 AM

Yikes that is so long... that means on a "work-night" we'll be getting out of the Met around or after 11! They never start on time & their intermissions are always longer than they predict.  



#43 fondoffouettes

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 09:34 AM

Does anyone know how long a La Scala intermission usually lasts? The old ABT Sleeping Beauty was 2 hrs 35 min. (including intermission), and I believe they usually aim for intermissions of approx. 20 mins. (as opposed to the Metropolitan Opera's tiresomely long 30-40 min. ones). If La Scala does intermissions that are as short as ABT's, then it's very likely that Ratmansky has restored some choreography. Twenty to 25 extra minutes of choreography would make sense for the wedding variations, I believe? And I have my fingers crossed that he can fit in that gorgeous entr'acte!

 

I find it very odd that ABT's press release on Sleeping Beauty did not mention that it would be a co-production with La Scala. Surely their press offices could have made a coordinated effort in publicizing this new ballet. 



#44 MRR

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 09:36 AM

Yikes that is so long... that means on a "work-night" we'll be getting out of the Met around or after 11! They never start on time & their intermissions are always longer than they predict.  

 

Might the La Scala version feature two intermissions?  Three hours seems very long for just one intermission. 

 

Even with the old McKenzie version lasting 2 1/2 hours, reinstating Little Red Riding Hood and Puss-in-Boots wouldn't take up that much time.  Personally I would also love to see Cinderella (the divertissement) reinstated: very few versions do it. 

 

I can't recall what else the production cuts.



#45 abatt

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 09:54 AM

McKenzie cut all the precious metal/precious stone dances.  He essentially ripped the guts out  of the wedding scene.




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