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ABT To Unveil New Sleeping Beauty For 75th Anniversary


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#16 rg

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 12:02 PM

surely the Entr'acte symphonique, while written with Auer in mind was composed BY Tchaikovsky?



#17 fondoffouettes

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 12:09 PM

 I wish there was some way the "Entr'acte symphonique" between Scenes I and II of Act II could be incorporated. Though it's not by Tchaikovsky and it was cut from the original production, I think it's some of the most beautiful music in the score. It would be hard to justify its inclusion from a dramatic standpoint and I realize it probably has no place in a production focused on historical reconstruction, but I love that section of music nonetheless.   

 

No.16 Scène

 

No.17 Panorama

  • Interpolation: 3 transitional bars for the end of no.17 composed by Riccardo Drigo to lead into no.19, as no.18 was cut in the original production

No.18 Entr'acte symphonique (solo for violin composed for Leopold Auer, cut from the original production)
 

Scene II — Le château de la belle au bois dormant No.19 Scène du château de sommeil

 

Sorry, rg...I was clearly in need of my mid-afternoon coffee as I was perusing wikipedia. In any case, I spoke too soon. This book recounts how Diaghilev and Stravinsky re-inserted the entr'acte for the Ballets Russes:

 

http://books.google.... beauty&f=false

 

It makes me wonder if ABT is interested in adhering to the Ballet Russes's arrangement of the score...



#18 rg

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 01:05 PM

bottom line: the SLEEPING BEAUTY entr'acte is a fine piece of music, which Balanchine 'noted' when he included it in his NUTCRACKER.



#19 FauxPas

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 01:13 PM

Well the panorama music is often cut down (as it was at the Maryinsky). It is stunning music and I hope to hear all of it.

 

As for the choreographic text used in 1921 - it was staged by Nicolas Sergeieff, the former regisseur of the Imperial Russian Ballet, St. Petersburg from the notations currently housed at Harvard.  So it would have been basically a faithful reconstruction of Petipa's original text as notated around 1900/1903.  But I have read that Bronislava Nijinska had a hand in excising much of the mime and rechoreographing a few of the dances in Act III's wedding scene.  Stravinsky made a lot of changes to Tchaikovsky's score.

 

Given that Ratmansky in collaboration with Yuri Burlaka at the Bolshoi has used the Harvard Collection Sergeyev notations before in reconstructing "Le Corsaire" and "Esmeralda" among other Petipa ballets - and they were used in the 1890 Mariinsky "Sleeping Beauty" reconstruction, I suspect his reconstruction would be based on that material.  Perhaps Doug Fullington will be involved, dare we hope?  Hopefully, Ratmansky will leave Petipa's major classical dances intact limiting his original choreography to some character dances which his off-kilter sense of humor should make memorable and charming.  I have read that there are sketchy portions of the Sergeyev notations like the Blind's Man Bluff section of the Hunting Party before the Vision Scene.  Or the Knitting Ladies.

 

Here are photos showing Bakst's original costume designs and some actual costumes:

 

http://nga.gov.au/Ex...nuID=3&GalID=23



#20 atm711

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 03:29 PM

Hmmm----I wonder, will this be another upstairs/downstairs scenario??innocent.gif



#21 sandik

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 03:31 PM

I don't have time to look it up right now, but you can check Lynn Garafola's excellent book on the Ballet Russe for details about their production.



#22 GWaugh

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 04:06 PM

 I wish there was some way the "Entr'acte symphonique" between Scenes I and II of Act II could be incorporated. Though it was cut from the original production, I think it's some of the most beautiful music in the score. It would be hard to justify its inclusion from a dramatic standpoint and I realize it probably has no place in a production focused on historical reconstruction, but I love that section of music nonetheless.   

 

No.16 Scène

 

No.17 Panorama

  • Interpolation: 3 transitional bars for the end of no.17 composed by Riccardo Drigo to lead into no.19, as no.18 was cut in the original production

No.18 Entr'acte symphonique (solo for violin composed for Leopold Auer, cut from the original production)
 

Scene II — Le château de la belle au bois dormant No.19 Scène du château de sommeil

 

Ashton choreographed an "Awakening Pas de Deux" to this music (I believe for Peter Wright's 1968 production). No. 20 (The Awakening) was cut and instead No. 18 (Entr'acte) began after the tam-tam of No. 19 (Entr'acte Symphonique).

The pas de deux is really very beautiful and dramatically makes much more sense than the allegro awakening. I BELIEVE the pas de deux was created for Sibley and Dowell.

 



#23 kbarber

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 06:52 PM

I think I read somewhere that Nijinska was responsible for adding the fish dives in the adagio of the grand pas de deux that are now standard in western productions.

#24 Drew

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 07:35 PM

It's hard for me to imagine any ABT Sleeping Beauty lasting longer than 2 h 45 minutes if as long (unions, Met audiences that have to make the train home etc). That would make for a limit to what they can keep/restore of original choreography. With the Bakst designs as point of reference they presumably don't have in mind a Mariinsky style type reconstruction in any case. But I do believe Ratmansky understands and loves Petipa and will do something well worth seeing!



#25 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 08:00 PM

The Precious Stones Pas ought to be back and he fairy tales characters need some reworking also.



#26 canbelto

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 08:16 PM

The NYCB leaves the Act 3 divertissements pretty much intact so let's hope the ABT's new version also does this.



#27 Natalia

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 07:49 AM

This new production is mentioned in the current issue of Dance Europe so I was about to post here but, of course, this was announced earlier. DE's short article uses the work 'rethinking'...

 

 I just hope that it will be a mostly-traditional version (steps and designs). No 'EL CHEAPO' or 'EL WACKO' productions, a-la Ratmansky's 'rethinking'  Firebird a couple of years ago, please.  Hopefully this will be more in keeping with Ratmansky's more classical manners (like Corsaire at the Bolshoi), being reverent and respectful of 1890s aesthetics. (Perhaps Burlaka may be involved, as he was with Corsaire-Bolshoi?)

 

One big positive for ABT:  No more 'Burger-King Florestan' (that crown & navy-blue robe) and no more day-glo fairy tutus!



#28 Birdsall

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 01:50 PM

 I wish there was some way the "Entr'acte symphonique" between Scenes I and II of Act II could be incorporated. Though it was cut from the original production, I think it's some of the most beautiful music in the score. It would be hard to justify its inclusion from a dramatic standpoint and I realize it probably has no place in a production focused on historical reconstruction, but I love that section of music nonetheless.   

 

No.16 Scène

 

No.17 Panorama

  • Interpolation: 3 transitional bars for the end of no.17 composed by Riccardo Drigo to lead into no.19, as no.18 was cut in the original production

No.18 Entr'acte symphonique (solo for violin composed for Leopold Auer, cut from the original production)
 

Scene II — Le château de la belle au bois dormant No.19 Scène du château de sommeil

 

I love that entr'acte. The Mariinsky does it during its Sleeping Beauty, and even though the curtain goes down, the auditorium goes dark except a spotlight on the violinist and the whole orchestra is mechanically raised during this portion, it is a breath-taking moment! It is so lovely!



#29 Josette

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 02:41 PM

In Nureyev's version (Paris Opera Ballet, National Ballet of Canada, among others) he gave the Prince a solo to the violin music. 



#30 mimsyb

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Posted 19 May 2014 - 07:05 PM

And hopefully no more "thud" of a castle smack dab in the middle of the stage in Aurora's Birthday scene, no more yucky "yellow brick road"  costumes for the Garland Waltz,  and maybe, just maybe the restoration of a few of the dances for the last act!  (and this is just a short list of the wrongs about this mess of a ballet.) This past production was a total embarrassment for a major company!




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