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Friday, February 21


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#1 dirac

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 12:42 PM

Pix of Royal Ballet dancers in "The Sleeping Beauty."

 

Starring Sarah Lamb and Steven McRae as Aurora and Prince Florimund, the ballet, first performed in St Petersburg in 1890, includes dramatic new set-pieces created by choreographers Frederick Ashton, Anthony Dowell and Christopher Wheeldon.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 22 February 2014 - 12:45 PM

Reviews of Houston Ballet in "Aladdin."

 

The Houston Chronicle

 

Bintley also stirs in plenty of dancing in a classical style; giving Aladdin and the Djinn, especially, an abundance of go-for-broke bravura material full of space-eating jetés, swift chaînés and fouettés But nuanced it is not. How could it be, given Carl Davis' brash and shallow score, which sounds at times like it wants to be the theme from "Star Wars"? (At one point, I couldn't tell if the Houston Ballet Orchestra was stumbling over some notes in a minor key or if the score was just that oddly written.)

 

 

Broadway World

 

Leading last night's magical performance was Joseph Walsh as Aladdin and Karina Gonzalez as Princess Badr al-Budur. As Aladdin, Joseph Walsh charms and beguiles the audience with his youthful spirit and energy, which is perfectly showcased in his athletic agility and sweeping movements. He leaps, tucks, rolls, and dances with the ease, confidence, and resilience of the young. Opposite him, Karina Gonzalez's Princess is danced with grace, undeniable beauty, and precision....... In the second and third acts, the delicate beauty of her dances move us and we look forward to each impressive lyrical moment, whether it is stunning pointe work or polished and refined romantic movements.

 

 

Houston Press

 

Bintley's Aladdin is fun and fast-paced, and a beautiful piece of craftsmanship in regards to set design and costumes. I assumed, and worried, that there would be special effects galore, but the wizardry was kept to a minimum in favor of strong dance moments by the lead players and the corps. And speaking of lead players, Aladdin marks another triumph for Joseph Walsh who creates a spunky underdog of a protagonist worth rooting for. 

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 04:56 AM

An obituary for Jim Capone, who has died at age 70.

 

Rockford's own Jim Capone performed with the Joffrey Ballet before traveling the globe to style hair as Paul Mitchell's protege.

 

He had been in close proximity to and touched the locks and tresses of musicians Prince, Melissa Manchester, LaToya Jackson and other well-known figures when he returned to his hometown in the new millennium.

 

 

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 04:59 AM

An item on the life of Lincoln Kirstein by Trudy Ring for Advocate.com.

 

That’s Lincoln Kirstein, writer, art collector, and founder of the New York City Ballet. Preston Savitz, the aesthete played by Bob Balaban in the movie, was inspired by Kirstein. The film doesn’t delve into Savitz’s personal life, and about the only clue that he bears any relationship to Kirstein is that he’s overseeing a ballet rehearsal when George Clooney’s Frank Stokes asks him to join the Monuments Men — although Balaban has said that reading Kirstein’s poetry helped him prepare for the role. Also, Savitz is just one character in a large ensemble. But Kirstein was such a remarkable man that he easily merits a movie of his own.

 

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 05:01 AM

A brief review of Matthew Bourne's Swan Lake by Kelly Apter in The Scotsman.

 

Which, in some ways, is hard to believe. Far from waning, interest in the show is bigger than ever, with a sell-out audience (and full standing ovation) greeting the performers in Glasgow.

 

 

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 05:08 AM

A review of the film version of the Royal Winnipeg Ballet's "Moulin Rouge-the Ballet."

 

Tip-toeing and leaping across the frame in ballet slippers, the turn-of-the-century story about an ambitious artist, a beautiful seductress and a jealous paramour feels a little out of sync from the start — if only because classical ballet and bawdy cancans seem entirely at odds.

 

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 02:01 AM

An interview with Misty Copeland by Roslyn Sulcas in The New York Times.

There are complex reasons for this: economics and access to ballet performances and classes, stereotypes about black women and — most worryingly for black female dancers — stereotypes about what a ballerina should be: white and waiflike.

 

“I think when I joined Ballet Theater, there were people on the staff who did not want to see a brown person in the corps onstage,” Ms. Copeland said.

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 02:12 AM

The National Ballet of Canada will present "A Month in the Country" seventeen years after the company first performed it.

Month soon acquired the status of a Royal Ballet heirloom, something not to be shared with other companies. Ashton died in 1988 and left Dowell the rights to Month. Dowell, who’d become the Royal Ballet’s artistic director two years earlier, was determined to maintain Month’s exclusivity.

 

“The ballet had been very precious to Fred and become one of our calling cards, part of our unique repertoire,” explains Dowell. But then Reid Anderson came knocking.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 02:14 AM

Reviews of the Birmingham Royal Ballet.

 

The Birmingham Post

 

Each piece was amusing, danced with due attention being paid to the original concept and it all kicked off with John Cranko’s Card Game which showed how funny and dangerous playing cards can be, something not unknown to those who may have lost their shirts when a hand of poker or blackjack has turned sour.

 

 

The Birmingham Mail

George Balanchine’s ballet – inspired by his love for Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers movies of the time – was centre spectacle of BRB’s triple bill Three of a Kind.

 

It was proceeded by the 1970s ragtime jollity of Elite Syncopations, choreographed by the Royal Ballet’s Kenneth MacMillan.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 12:29 PM

Jenifer Ringer will lead Los Angeles' new Colburn Dance Academy.

 

Jenifer Ringer, a former principal dancer with the New York City Ballet who retired from the company earlier this month, will lead the new academy. L.A. Dance Project co-founder Benjamin Millepied is serving as an artistic advisor and will offer a master class to students.

 

 

 




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