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dirac

Monday, February 17

9 posts in this topic

A preview of Oregon Ballet Theatre's new program by Grant Butler in The Oregonian.

The program includes the return of three dances that are popular with audiences: James Kudelka's "Almost Mozart"; Christopher Wheeldon's haunting "Liturgy," and Nicolo Fonte's breathtaking interpretation of Maurice Ravel's "Bolero." Also on the program is "A Second Front," a world premiere ballet from OBT's former artistic director Christopher Stowell, who left the company in 2012, but whose imprint can still be deeply seen.

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San Francisco Ballet premieres a new work from Val Caniparoli.

Yet it's possible to overlook Caniparoli's steady achievement here at his home company, where international dance makers like Wayne McGregor and Alexei Ratmansky tend to command the cachet. "How do I let people know all that I'm doing?" Caniparoli says, leaning back and raising an eyebrow with genuine perplexity, looking handsome as ever after 41 years with San Francisco Ballet, having recently allowed his full head of black hair to turn a dashing silver. "I'm trying to figure out how to get the word out, because I work my butt off."

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Ballet Theatre of Maryland tackles the complete "Swan Lake."

"This is one of the most challenging full-length ballets for a small company to tackle because it is long, demanding and almost everybody has some knowledge to have expectations for it," Cuatto said. "This adds to the pressure for both the choreographer and principal dancers, Nicole Kelsch [who portrays Odette/Odile] and Django Allegretti, her prince."

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A review of Richmond Ballet's 'Cinderella' by Julinda Lewis in The Richmond Times-Dispatch.

Choreographed in 2000 by the company’s ballet master and artistic associate, Malcolm Burn, this “Cinderella” differed from more traditional versions. While much of the setting remained the same, Burn gave the ballet contemporary nuances in choreography and body language. Peter Farmer’s scenery and costume design were elegant and done on a large scale and the closing scene was breathtaking.

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Society pages report on the Houston Ballet Ball.

On Saturday night, Houston socialites were not treated to a new signature scent, but their $1,500 tickets bought them a gourmet meal in a fantastical, colorful setting inside the Wortham theater. Honorees at this year’s ball were Ballet artistic director Stanton Welch and Houston Methodist, and guests also participated in a silent auction. Oh, yes, and there was a monkey in attendance.

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Viengsay Valdes presents an electronic version of her biography, De Acero y Nube (Of Steel and Cloud).

According to the first figure of the National Ballet of Cuba (BNC), this book humanizes her because it offers the public an opportunity to meet her beyond the scene. It talks about her efforts to become a world-class artist and contains statements of essential people in her career.

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Reviews of New York City Ballet's Coppélia.

The New York Times

In Act I, before the doll business, Ms. Fairchild shows more amplitude in her upper body and a fuller response to Delibes’s stretched phrases than she did in the role five years ago. Swanilda is probably her best part, though there’s still room for improvement in the Act III wedding dance. The balances and turns are brilliant, but the music grows larger than she does — a deficiency of projection, not size.

The Financial Times

In the opening casts, Megan Fairchild and Tiler Peck met these competing demands with nary a wobble or missed accent. I cannot imagine anyone doing better. They had less success, however, finding Swanilda in the steps.

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A review of Tulsa Ballet by James D. Watts Jr. for Tulsa World.

This is the fourth time the company has performed this ballet, yet choreographer Ben Stevenson's take on this story never loses its charm. It's more purely classical in structure than "Dracula," another Stevenson ballet Tulsa Ballet audiences know well, yet the stateliness is well-balanced with a healthy dose of knock-about comedy.

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A review of Colorado Ballet by Ray Mark Rinaldi in The Denver Post.

But perform it they do, and we all know why. Because ballet audiences — who experience so little of the art form these days they don't know there are better titles — pay to see it. The Colorado Ballet version, on stage now at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, is a huge commercial success. and that means scores of highly trained dancers and expert musicians, plus a legion of stagehands, box office attendants and administrators all get paid. "Cinderella" keeps the ballet in business.

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