Jump to content


"Balanchine's Dancing Cowboy"


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

    Diamonds Circle

  • Board Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 24,799 posts

Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:13 AM

Frank Ohman has written his autobiography.

Balanchine, who loved the American West, called Ohman his “cowboy.”

 

Apparently sensing the young man’s bewilderment, he began offering advice on personal, career, and spiritual matters. This relationship lasted until Balanchine’s death. “Like a caring father figure, he seemed more concerned about my character than my dancing,” writes Ohman.

 

 

 



#2 Stage Right

Stage Right

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 99 posts

Posted 16 February 2014 - 06:36 AM

Thank you for this head's up! Sounds like a good one.



#3 Neryssa

Neryssa

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 159 posts

Posted 16 June 2014 - 01:08 PM

The positive and spiritual tone of the book is nice when Ohman is writing about his grandmother or Balanchine but I was quite disappointed with the book as a whole. It is not detailed enough. Has anybody else read it?



#4 California

California

    Platinum Circle

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,401 posts

Posted 16 June 2014 - 02:49 PM

I skimmed it. He does provide a lot of detail on his interaction with Balanchine, which is interesting. I was struck at how informal and un-bureaucratic Balanchine was in those days in hiring dancers, letting them take leaves of absence, etc.



#5 Neryssa

Neryssa

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 159 posts

Posted 18 June 2014 - 10:37 AM

I skimmed it. He does provide a lot of detail on his interaction with Balanchine, which is interesting. I was struck at how informal and un-bureaucratic Balanchine was in those days in hiring dancers, letting them take leaves of absence, etc.

Thanks, California. I wanted more detail about the ballets and Balanchine. Also, it was very repetitive in spots. Is there an older thread titled something to the effect of "Memoirs or Biographies I Want To Read (meaning, I want to read an autobiography/biography that hasn't been written or published yet by a dancer).



#6 kfw

kfw

    Sapphire Circle

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,237 posts

Posted 18 June 2014 - 11:08 AM

Is there an older thread titled something to the effect of "Memoirs or Biographies I Want To Read (meaning, I want to read an autobiography/biography that hasn't been written or published yet by a dancer).

 

Indeed there is. smile.png Who needs a biography?

 

Thanks, Neryssa and California, for filling us in.



#7 Neryssa

Neryssa

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 159 posts

Posted 18 June 2014 - 01:09 PM

 

Is there an older thread titled something to the effect of "Memoirs or Biographies I Want To Read (meaning, I want to read an autobiography/biography that hasn't been written or published yet by a dancer).

 

Indeed there is. smile.png Who needs a biography?

 

Thanks, Neryssa and California, for filling us in.

 

 

Thank you for the link! :-D



#8 Helene

Helene

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,990 posts

Posted 12 July 2014 - 11:27 PM

I enjoyed reading this book a lot. It read like listening to someone tell his story sitting by a fireplace, where repetition feels very natural.  I felt that he talked/wrote about what was important to him and what he wanted to articulate.  That wasn't, though, detailed descriptions of learning and creating roles.  It was a very personal book.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users


Help support Ballet Alert! and Ballet Talk for Dancers year round by using this search box for your amazon.com purchases (adblockers may block display):