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Saturday, February 15


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12 replies to this topic

#1 dirac

dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:00 AM

A review of the cinema broadcast of the Royal Ballet's 'Giselle' by Sandra Kurtz for Seattle Dances.

These programs have all the thrills and deficits that we’re accustomed to from the PBS Live from Lincoln Center broadcasts—we get a chance to see the company in their home theater, in a relatively unmediated performance. The cameras “sit” in parts of the theater that most of us cannot afford on a regular basis—indeed, in some cases, we see more detail than anyone else besides the performers themselves. But while the director sometimes makes choices that we wouldn’t make ourselves, about who to watch or how often to change our focus, the access these programs give us to artists and companies that we otherwise might never see more than makes up for the occasional foot that’s cropped out of the picture.

 

 

 



#2 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:05 AM

A review of Miami City Ballet by Jordan Levin in The Miami Herald.

 

The "Dance at the Gym" was exhilarating, with Jeanette Delgado incandescent as Anita, swirling and stomping with the kind of aplomb that would be arrogant if it weren’t so joyfully natural. She’s no Broadway belter, but leading the Puerto Rican women in America, Delgado etched the song’s sharp accents and mocking lyrics, matching them with riotously swishing hips and arching body that made it hard to believe she’s ever been in a tutu. She eclipsed every other woman onstage.

 

 

 

 

 



#3 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:07 AM

MCB holds a cocktail reception for donors.

 

Renato’s owner Arlene Desiderio hosted the reception, which included cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, a few words from executive director Dan Hagerty, and music.

 



#4 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:09 AM

A review of Tulsa Ballet's 'Cinderella' by James D. Watts Jr. for Tulsa World.

 

In Stevenson’s version, the Stepsisters aren’t so much evil or mean as they are bratty — basically, these two are the worst-behaved children in the theater, who seem to enjoy the fact that they can frighten almost anyone merely by looking at them.

 



#5 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:15 AM

A review of the Royal Ballet by Luke Jennings in The Observer.

Wayne McGregor's Tetractys: The Art of Fugue is a work for 12 dancers set to Bach. In theory, the pairing of Bach and McGregor makes sense, in that both are acutely alive to the mathematics and architecture of composition. In practice, their conversation is only sporadically comprehensible. An opening duet between Edward Watson and Natalia Osipova is a fascinating exercise, as McGregor meets Bach's baroque algebra with choreography of slippery, live-eel complexity. But as the stage fills, the music's ineluctable cadences seem increasingly at odds with the production.

 



#6 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:19 AM

The Ailey company brings Chroma to Miami.

Chroma is probably the most daring new entry. McGregor, a hot contemporary ballet choreographer, made it in 2006 for the Royal Ballet, where he is a resident choreographer. The score features orchestrations of music by Jack White III of alternative rock band The White Stripes and a soaring white set by minimalist architect John Pawson. (The massive structure posed its own challenges for the Ailey company’s frequent tours, and the Miami shows will be the first time it will use the set on tour.)

 

 



#7 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:21 AM

A review of Ballet San Antonio by Jasmina Wellinghoff for the Express-News.

Compared to the multi-hued drama of “Firebird,” the contemporary pieces by Ballet San Antonio Artistic Director Gabriel Zertuche seemed positively cool and restrained. Besides the reprise of “Surfacing,” a work that premiered in the spring of 2012, Zertuche created two new ones for this show — “Wired” and “Valsa de San Valentino.” Set to techno music by a band identified as Polaris (there have been many bands with that name), the short “Wired” basically reflects the staccato beat of the music and plays with the tall shadows of the five dancers to enhance the visual effects. The five are Dylan Duke, Andrea Alshouse, Jessica Gregory, Crystal Serrano and Kaya Wolsey, all accomplished performers.

 

 

 



#8 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:23 AM

A piece on the backstory of Jorma Elo's “C. to C. (Close to Chuck)”  by Jeffrey Gantz in The Boston Globe.

The creation of “C. to C.” actually involved a quartet of individuals: Elo, painter and photographer Chuck Close, composer Philip Glass, and pianist Bruce Levingston. Its genesis goes back to Paris in 1964, when Glass and Close first met. They crossed paths again in New York in 1967, and in 1968 Close took his iconic photograph of Glass. Both men went on to become major American artists; in 1988, Close suffered a spinal aneurysm that left him in a wheelchair, but he continues to work.

 

 



#9 dirac

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 04:31 AM

A review of the Hamburg Ballet by Rita Felciano for danceviewtimes.

 

And yet, this could have been such a welcome addition to twentieth century story ballets of which there are precious few successful ones. With "Romeo and Juliet" and "Hamlet Connotations" Neumeier had tackled Shakespeare before but this is the work that has survived. Here he divided the tale into three distinct areas of activity: the (pseudo) Greek court, the woods inhabited by fantasy creatures, and the world of the rustics. The artifice of the woods -- something out of sci-fi movies -- was the riskiest of changes since it's about as far from an idealized sense of nature as it could be. As a coup de theatre, if not emotionally, it worked.

 



#10 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:44 PM

A review of Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre's 'Swan Lake' by Mark Kanny in The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

Christine Schwaner had been scheduled to dance the leading role Friday night with Nurlan Abougaliev. After she suffered a stress fracture, both dancers had to be replaced because the roles are rehearsed as a team.

 

That meant both Amanda Cochrane and Yoshiaki Nakano starred for the first time in their careers in “Swan Lake.” Each is an exceptionally promising young dancer who has risen to soloist, not yet principal. And each has made the “25 to Watch” list in Dance Magazine.

 

 

 

 

 



#11 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:46 PM

The Ballet Repertory Theatre of New Mexico presents 'Swan Lake.'

BRT director Katherine Giese has recruited former Joffrey Ballet principal dancer Mauro Villanueva to dance the role of Prince Seigfried, whose search for a princess propels the story.

 

“Katherine reached out to me after I was retiring from full company life,” the 32-year-old dancer said. “This is not a traditional version. It’s playing off the traditional version with a twist. The steps are difficult, but the storytelling is very important. It’s more complex than people imagine.”

 

 



#12 dirac

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Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:48 PM

Miami City Ballet announces the lineup for its 2014-15 season.

 

Topping the list of new works is a ballet by Justin Peck, a young New York City Ballet choreographer who has been critically praised for the works he has made there. Peck, who created the striking pas de deux Chutes and Ladders for MCB last spring, will make a large-scale group piece in collaboration with famed muralist and street artist Shepard Fairey. The still-untitled piece will be set to Bohuslav Martinu’s Piano Concerto No. 1 and will debut on MCB’s fourth program in spring 2015.

 



#13 dirac

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Posted 21 February 2014 - 12:42 AM

A review of the Royal Ballet (and a brief comment on "Big Ballet") by Giannandrea Poesio in The Spectator.

 

The new ballet was sandwiched between two monoliths of British choreography: Ashton’s Rhapsody and MacMillan’s Gloria. Both brought down the house. In the former, Laura Morera and Steven McRae gave a performance to remember. McRae is one of the few who can dazzle audiences without indulging in vulgar, cheap tricks. Which makes him ideal for Rhapsody, where dance pyrotechnics must always be matched by noble poise and behaviour. As for Morera, her understanding of the stylistic requirements and interpretative subtleties are second to none. I only wish the corps de ballet had been more in unison. The ever so poignant Gloria is an ideal vehicle for stars such as Carlos Acosta and Sarah Lamb. Their rendition crowned what, as a whole, was a beautiful evening.

 

 




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